Browsing Tag: Wisconsin

    Alfred University Seth Spicer at 2018 NCAA Division III Outdoor Track & Field Championships
    Articles, Blog

    Alfred University Seth Spicer at 2018 NCAA Division III Outdoor Track & Field Championships

    January 18, 2020


    Uh you know, it’s exciting to watch Seth compete this whole indoor and outdoor season. He’s an incredible young man. Uh super talented and you know, works very, very hard, so it was great to see him become All-American indoors and then with
    last year with knowing that he came up a little short in the
    decathlon outdoors it was great to see him come out here and fight hard and have to
    run an amazing 1,500 to secure that eighth place position and to become
    All-American for the first time outdoors but to become a three-time All-American overall
    so this means a great deal for the program you know I think it helps the
    underclassmen see what is possible with hard work and working hard and how it to take
    you to the NCAA Championships that you can become an All-American like
    Seth Spicer so it’s an amazing opportunity and
    I just love him so much and so I’m going to miss him next year but it gives me inspiration
    to work hard to have the program following his footsteps.
    [Coach Sortore] Well I’ve said it before I feel the University was less and then Seth came to us because his talent could have landed him anywhere. But beyond his talent is
    one of the hardest working kids 40 years of track and field that I’ve ever seen to be
    around either as an athlete, myself, or as a coach. His dedication is ridiculous and it has set
    a standard for uh, those that are following up behind the
    underclassmen so it’s a joy he turns every single
    competitor he’s got into a friend and they’re cheering for him whether he’s
    beating them or they’re beating him. He is just a real blessing to
    the University and I’m proud to of a part of that for four
    years. [Spicer] As far as the meet goes this has been
    one of the longest decathlons and probably one of the most emotional rollercoasters that I’ve been on It’s been hot. Like dreadfully hot
    and again just like indoor, I was tight going into the last event. Contrary
    to indoor, though, with the Top-8 in indoor, some of them had not the best times going into the 1,000 but this time every single one of them had very
    respectable 1,500 times I knew that I was really going to have to grind
    and get after it with it being last my last race to make podium.
    It’s almost symbolic actually. I’ve never had a great decathlon all together
    even in the rough discus the rough few events today really, it was that close and I just had to work hard to get where I wanted to be. It’s weird how it’s all worked out. [Coach White] Yeah well I was pretty a hot day to say the least both of these days we’re lucky
    the rain came just after 15 but for most of the days it was 80 degrees and very
    very humid so first day starts out typically very consistent his first day
    and so we pretty much knew he’d have to make up some points the second day
    second day he had a couple rough spots with the discus and the in the vault his
    javelin was decent but we knew he had to really fight for the 1,500 and when you
    watched that 1,500 you know that he fought tooth and nail for his spot he
    only he secured All-American by eight points which is not a lot that in the
    decathlon so we’re all very very impressed with the Man-Mode of the 15.
    [Coach Phillips] Yeah well Seth is an athlete that is great to watch he’s a lot
    of fun both on and off the track just a great guy personality-wise and just
    watching him can be is just an honor both just today and yesterday you know
    in the decathlon for the 10 events of the last two days it was a lot he was hot it was hot out
    there but he did well and not only today for the past four years
    we’ve got to really see an individual grow both in you know in the sport of
    track and field but also as a person and that you know really hits home
    you know both as an alumni but also somebody who enjoys track and field and enjoys athletics
    just to see a kid like him grow and truly, you know, a respected adult so to speak, it’s just an honor.
    I’m happy to be here. [Caitlin] Seth is a great guy he’s a great
    competitor I definitely think that being an athletic trainer himself helped him
    he knows just what to do who knows what to do in the heat, he who knows what to do
    when he’s tired so he actually makes my job a lot easier but he just has the drive
    he has what it takes to be a great athlete be a good competitor so he knows
    what he’s doing he knows his stuff he’s going to go out there and get it done, do whatever he needs to do.

    What NOT To Do at Your First Track Day
    Articles, Blog

    What NOT To Do at Your First Track Day

    January 14, 2020


    (crowd cheering)
    (car speeding past, crashing) (screaming)
    (car crashing) – [Spectator] Ach du Scheisse! – [Spectator] Scheisse! (coughing) – [Alex] So, in today’s video
    of food that Alex gets to eat (clearing his throat) I’ve yet to get it sponsored by anybody. But (swallows his words). Bro, potato (beep) is. We have to beep out the name of it, because we’re gonna say it’s not suitable for some advertisers. (clearing his throat) But, you know, we just say, Olé today. That’s all that I’m saying. (sighing)
    Sponsors please. That is really fast (beep). So you’ve decided to do it. You’ve finally decided to pull the trigger and decided that you
    want to track your car. And hey! Congratulations! That’s a big leap for a lot of people. The track can be pretty intimidating. It’s scary out there. It’s not like your car shows, you know, where you just pull into
    the parking lot, ramp, or whatever it is where you just park in and walk around, judging
    everybody else’s car. No. At the track, all eyes are on you. If you (beep) up there. Oh serious. If you frick up there, because of monetization issues I can’t say the other one anymore. There’s like stands full
    of people watching you. And they aren’t just, like,
    looking at how your car looks, they’re judging how you drive
    your car and how you perform. (engines revving) And if you’re an under-performer, (throat clearing) that can be a little humiliating. And if you’re not, you know, if that’s not nerve racking enough, the guy next to you that you’re racing, more than likely is more
    experienced than you and is probably going to
    make you look like an idiot. At least on your first pass. Not saying that’s happened
    to anyone ever before. That’s me. Oh, there are some things
    that you should be expecting and that you should be ready for as you go in to track your car. By the way, I’m Alex
    from Fitmentindustries. Don’t forget to subscribe,
    hit the bell button so that we can do all of the extra stuff and I can keep having
    to try and get free food from massive organizations. The first tip is, don’t
    crash on your first lap. Now, I know it sounds
    funny and and simple, but it happens a lot more
    often than you would think. You’re all hyped up on Red Bull, because it’s your first
    day on going to the track. You’ve talked yourself
    up to all of your friends and you’re just anxious to get out there. You’re going to get on the track, you’re gonna go fast as possible, like Steve McQueen, ka-ciao! You know, that’s the game plan. But you don’t take into account the fact that the track is cold, your tires are cold, your engine is cold, everything is cold. And you know what happens when you’re cold and you overdo it? You crash, into everything. Including other people. And that’s really kind of
    embarrassing, not just unsafe. Along with crashing, just don’t have high
    expectations going in. Now, you might think that
    you’re the best driver in the world and, you know, you’re a killer in changing
    lanes on the highway and you know when the
    light’s gonna turn green, but that does not mean that you’re the best driver in the world. That just means you can
    drive your car efficiently. But when you actually
    start driving on a track, your car will all of a sudden
    seem a bit harder to handle. You’re all hyped up and the helmet, you got the helmet on, you’re ready to go down the drag strip, you know you’re ready to kick it, you’re ready to go. Finally your turn to run. You’ve got traction control off, you’re going to do, like, the biggest, fattest, gnarliest burn-out. And then you’re going to
    wax the dude next to you. That’s not gonna happen. You’re gonna get to the water box, that part we have correct. You’re gonna try to do a burn-out, but you’re probably gonna (beep) it up, because you’re all nervous and you can’t hear anything
    through your helmet, which throws you off more
    than you would think, because you can’t actually hear your car as well as you normally could. And then you’re gonna
    charge into the staging line and you’re gonna realize
    that that’s actually closer than you think, which
    is gonna make you overshoot it. Then that old and grumpy
    old man in the middle is gonna be like: And then you’re going to try backing up, but you’re going to start
    stumbling’ over a little bit, everything’s really hot and the old guy is going
    to get more aggravated and he’s gonna do one of these and then you’re gonna move too far back and then he’s gonna tell you
    to stop, but you didn’t stop because you accidentally
    slipped the clutch and the car jumps back
    a little bit further. Then you’re going to press on the brake. Then you’re gonna realize you’re
    too far back at this point and you’re thinking at this point, why am I here? Because it’s not, it
    hasn’t been fun so far. It really hasn’t. And who the (beep) would
    put the staging line in such a dumb (beep) spot? And then there’s muffled screaming coming out of your helmet, you have the old guy getting mad at you. The guy next to you just wants to run, because that’s what he’s there for. So finally, you’re about to go. You’re ready, you see the
    two yellow lights light up, but it’s way faster than you think. You thought that they
    would launch in sequential? Hm. Na ah. Nah, in some places they
    just do ’em at the same time because (beep) that, right? They light up more, they
    light up faster than you think and then you get ready to launch. The tree’s dropping, you’re not ready, it’s going too fast, your
    brain is just messing up, you go to launch your car, you’re there either too early, too late, or you messed up the whole thing. But it’s okay, because
    everyone has to learn. Everyone goes through those terrible, gut-wrenching first passes. And we made it out alive too. And so are you. You just wanna make sure that
    you shouldn’t expect too much when you’re going into
    your first track day. Now, either that’s at a drag
    strip or an autocross event, it’s probably going to go the same way. If you’re gonna go to a track with others that have been there before, it’d actually be a good
    idea to listen to them. A lot of times your friends
    are gonna give you advice and you probably shouldn’t
    be offended when they do. They mean well and they just
    wanna help you do better. So if they notice something
    that you can improve on, you probably just wanna, like, do it. You should be open to it, because they see it and you don’t. And unless you have a camera that’s actually recording your track time or anything like that, they’re going to be your
    eyes to improve your time. You’re actually gonna be more than likely to be a better driver
    as a result of it, too, because this is especially
    the case in autocross. It’s not uncommon,
    actually, for other drivers or event organizers to ride with newbies and give pointers during your run. It’s weird, it’s slightly uncomfortable, but it helps everyone make improvements they just didn’t know they needed to make. And that is probably
    one of the best things you could possibly take advice on. Another thing is to remember, if you’re unfamiliar with the track, you probably gonna wanna take some time to go through the event beforehand to see how everything works. You’re gonna wanna watch the drivers, you’re wanna see what they do, as well as what the staff does, what they include, what they don’t include and what they want from drivers. Otherwise you’re just gonna go in blindly and that’s pretty much never a good thing. Pay attention to what supplies you’ll need and what kind of helmet you’ll need and all that sort of stuff. (talking rapidly) into, like, clothing, because that’s something
    that a lot of people have a tendency to forget about. Most tracks want you to wear
    pants and closed-toed shoes for your safety. Don’t be like (clears his throat) Claire, show up to the drag strip wearing shorts, because guess who had
    to sit on the bleachers and watch the whole time, while her car was sitting in the pits? (claps his hands) That girl. Still ran against your boyfriend, though. His worst time was my best time. That’s a win for me. And that’s not fun for anyone, so make sure you’re prepared. You’re not the only one that
    needs to be prepared, though, your car does too. And I know, that weird
    thing that you actually plan on actually racing on a track. You’re gonna need to go
    through tech inspection before you race. So you gonna wanna make sure
    that your car is at least at, like, the fundamental level
    ready for a tech inspection. So that it doesn’t have, like,
    any weird (beep) going on. You’re gonna wanna make
    sure the whole thing is just just okay, that the
    battery is actually tied down. That, depending on how fast you are, you have a cut-off switch. That your seatbelt works,
    you know, things like that. That you don’t, that you’re
    not running on quarts, that you’re not leaking a
    quart of oil every hour. Just don’t run it at the track. Because let’s say that you lie about that and you run your leaky something
    or another down the track, you’re gonna end up
    ruining it for everyone. Because next thing you know,
    you’re going to be doing a pull and the coolant leak that you
    had, that you’re aware about is worse than you thought and
    now that it’s overheating, it’s actually just, like, pissing
    everywhere down the track. And since it’s night time,
    you don’t really notice it. You just, kinda, run down the line and then the GTR behind you
    almost crashes into a wall because the track is slippery and unsafe, but no one could see it. And it’s just not cool. Now everybody’s waiting
    in line for 5000 years so the track staff can clean up your mess. So if your shit don’t work the right way, just leave it at home and
    fix it and bring it back. Our next point is especially true if you haven’t done much racing. Don’t go faster than
    you’re comfortable with. I know the peer pressure
    weighing on your shoulder is gonna try and push you
    to go as fast as possible to impress your friends. But it’s not worth it, it’s not fun, you don’t know what you’re doing, you’re gonna make a fool out of yourself, you’re gonna look dumb. Just don’t. Coz you’re gonna lose control
    and you’re gonna get hurt. We don’t want you to get hurt. Take it slower. At first. Then build up to the high speed, so you’re actually going to be able to keep control of your
    car on the first track run. Lots of times not many people will realize that their car behaves much
    differently at 70 miles an hour than at 110 miles an hour. And the difference is
    like an exponential curve, for those that paid attention in school, that, when the difference
    goes up in speed, the actual difference
    in how your car behaves, almost gets magnified. Like you know that things
    can get loosey-goosey, so make sure to feel out,
    at least the first time, how the car feels, before
    you go balls to the wall and just try to send it. So at this point you’re a bit overwhelmed, which is why you need to take breaks. When you’re at the track,
    you shouldn’t be beating the (beep) out of your
    car the entire time. Take some time to park
    it, let it cool down, grab something to eat and just go rest. I don’t know, like, maybe
    go lie down or something. Really what it comes down to, it allows you to reflect
    on your actual drive time, your practices and things like that, plus you can get tips from the people that were watching you run. If you’re doing full
    autocross or HPD event, this also allows you to stay alert and pay attention when you’re at the track and it allows you to watch
    what others are doing so that you can improve yourself and not get any sort of driving fatigue. Which is actually a lot more common than what people would think. Or you can just run
    your (beep) like I did, because I could not figure
    out for the life of me how to run the car. And I was just willing to
    risk it for the biscuit. Most importantly, be aware. Keep your surroundings in
    mind, as well as your safety and how your car is reacting
    to what you’re doing. You might be a good driver, but Billy next to you might not be and he just got his license and he’s trying to
    figure out how he can run his Chevvy Malibu, all
    the way down the track as fast as is humanely possible. And he thought it was a great idea to beat the shit out it, because it wasn’t his car,
    he got it from his parents. And guess what? He didn’t watch this video. So we just don’t know what
    could happen in that scenario, but if you have watched it,
    we may have saved a life. We don’t know what could
    happen at the track, so be mindful of yourself and alert of what’s happening around you. Those are our tips for if
    you’re going to the track for the first time. We wish you the best of luck. And of course, don’t forget, if you’re looking for
    wheels, tires, suspension be sure to check out
    fitmentindustries.com. We also have a wheel give-away
    that we partner with ESR, it’s in the month of April, so if it’s past that, I’m sorry, we probably got another one. You can check it out in
    the description link below. Don’t forget to subscribe. I’m Alex, from Fitmentindustries
    and we will see you later. Peace. (electronic music)

    Train collision at Slinger railroad crossing is an extremely rare occurrence
    Articles, Blog

    Train collision at Slinger railroad crossing is an extremely rare occurrence

    August 31, 2019


    THINGS FANS WON’T BE ABLE TO USE TONIGHT. THERE ARE TRAIN AND CAR CRASHES AND TRAIN DERAILMENTS, BUT THIS IS EXTREMELY RARE HERE. TWO TRAINS ARE COLLIDING AT A RAILROAD CROSSING. TODAY SO MANY OF YOU ARE QUESTIONING HOW COULD SOMETHING LIKE THIS ACTUALLY HAPPEN? THE COLLISION WAS LAST NIGHT AND THE CLEAN UP INTENSE. THREE ENGINES AND 10 RAILCARS DERAILED SPILLING 5,000 GALLONS OF DIESEL FUEL. WE HAVE TEAM COVERAGE THROUGHOUT THE DAY. 12 NEWS IS LIVE ON ON THE GROUND. FIRST WE WANT TO GO TO MATT WHO IS LIVE IN NEWS CHOPPER 12. THE MESS THAT IS THERE. THAT’S RIGHT, THE CREWS ARE WORKING TO GET THINGS CLEANED UP SO THEY CAN REOPEN THE SECTION OF TRAFFIC. THE TRAFFIC CROSSES RIGHT BETWEEN SLINGER HIGH SCHOOL AND A FUEL TANK FARM. YOU CAN SEE CREWS OUT HERE WORKING TRYING TO SIPHON OFF THE FUEL THAT SPILLED. THEY ARE DOWN THERE WORKING WITH TANKER TRUCKS TRYING TO SUCK UP SOME OF THE FUEL SPILL TO GET THAT ALL CLEANED UP. OTHER CREWS ARE WORKING TO REPAIR SOME OF THE TRACKS TRYING TO GET THIS OPEN. YOU CAN SEE A LOT OF THE MESS IS STILL IN PLACE. WE WILL HAVE MORE ON HOW THE PROGRESS IS COMING IN A FEW MINUTES. BACK TO YOU GUYS. NICK IS GETTING NEW INFORMATION ON HOW ALL OF THIS HAPPENED. RESCUE CREWS GAVE WAY TO CLEAN UP CREWS. THE CLEAN UP IS UNDERWAY AND IT IS VERY MUCH A PROJECT CONSIDERING TWO FREIGHT TRAINS COLLIDED AT A CROSSING AND JUST DOWN THE WAY THE PROGRESS IS REMARKABLE. EVEN AS THE SUN ROSE CREWS WERE ALREADY WORKING TO CLEAR THE TRACKS. THIS WREAK NOT ONLY INTERRUPTED RAIL COMERS THROUGHOUT THE STATE, BUT A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP FOR A GOOD MANY RESIDENTS. IT STOPPED ON THE TRACKS. THEY ALWAYS BREAK DOWN ANYWAYS, BUT THE FIREFIGHTER AND POLICE CAME IN. TRUCKS GOING BY WITH THE LIGHTS FLASHES AND THEN OUR NEIGHBOR CAME OVER AND TOLD US WE WERE SUPPOSED TO EVACUATE. WE WENT TO MY SISTER SISTER-IN-LAW’S PLACE. 12 NEWS LEARNED NORTHBOUND WISCONSIN AND SOUTHERN TRAIN STOPPED BEFORE COMPLETELY CLEARING A SPOT WHERE THE TRACKS CROSSED LIKE AN ELONGATED X. PART OF THE TRAIN WAS HANGING OVER THE CROSSING. IT WAS CROSSED BY A SOUTHBOUND CN RAIL TRAIN. TWO MEN ON THE CN RAIL TRAIN WERE HURT, BUT HAD MINOR INJURIES AND WAS TREATED AND RELEASED. THIS WAS ON TOP OF THE SCENE. THIS WAS THE FIRST OF THREE LOCO MOTIVES THAT WERE UPRIGHTED AND TAKEN OUT OF HERE. THIS IS SOME 15 HOURS AFTER THE TRAIN CRASHED. OBVIOUSLY THIS IS GOING TO BE A LONG PROCESS. THE LOCO MOTIVES ARE HEAVILY DAMAGED AND ONE SPILLED ABOUT 5,000 GALLONS OF DIESEL FUEL. THE FIRE CHIEF SAID IT DIDN’T REACH A NEARBY CREEK. HE SUGGESTS RESIDENTS STILL STEER CLEAR. STARE CLEAR. TRAFFIC SHOULD BE AWARE OF THAT AND TRY NOT TO RUBBERNECK TOO MUCH. AND THE INVESTIGATION WILL INVOLVE CERTAINLY INTERVIEWS WITH CREWS AND INSPECTING THE TRACKS AND THE EQUIPMENT. THE PEOPLE WHO WERE EVACUATED WERE ALLOWED BACK IN THEIR HOME IN ABOUT FIVE HOURS. THE WORRY WAS ABOUT THE DIESEL FUEL POSSIBLY IGNITING. I JUST TALKED TO A REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE RAILROAD AND THEY TELL ME THEY WILL BE ABLE TO REOPEN THE TRACK HERE WITHIN THE NEXT FEW HOURS.

    Articles

    Overly Excited Tourist Discovers Green Bay’s Hidden Treasures

    August 26, 2019


    – Holy cheese cheese! I’m here at Green Day Wisconsin, home of the Green Day plackerds. We’re gonna explore the Green Days and have a good time. (simple, pleasant music) (hard rock music) I’m here inside beautiful
    larabeau field where the Green Day plackerds play ball. You gotta be joking my ass they got a giant lombardo trophy. They say it’s 100 feet tall and it’s full of gouda. Say cheese (laughs) As you can probably imagination, the big G stands for go Green Day place cards. Are you joking my ass? Look at all these urinals! (chaotic laughter) Are you fooling around inside my ass? Look at the size of this moose. They say he’s 100 feet tall and he loves everyone except the Greeks. Are you joking my ass? I’m in Avery’s Auto. If I get murdered please avenge my deaths. Well now I’m at the
    national railrod museum, let’s go see some railrods! You gotta be joking my ass, I’m in the cockpitch. I am the train conductor. (childish laughter) You joking my ass they
    got a classic small train. Historic red train. Classic night train. World famous flashlight train. Incomparable green train. Heralded pumpkin train. Unforgettable boat train. The great attitude train. Train that is a barn. Train that is a bicycle. Train that is a truck. Future train number two. Dumped sideways train. Yup that was pretty much all the trains. Here I am at the green bang river. They say it’s 100 feet across and it’s full of batteries. You gotta be joking my ass, there is no way that greengang Wisconsin has a giant dinosaur! With a big old penis! And look they have a hippopotamus too, are you joking my ass? Well overall I had a pretty good day here at the Green Day plackerds. I think it even was the best day of my whole life. (heavy techno music)

    WPT University Place: Wisconsin’s Underground Railroad
    Articles, Blog

    WPT University Place: Wisconsin’s Underground Railroad

    August 21, 2019


    – Today we are pleased
    to introduce Jesse Gant as part of the Wisconsin
    Historical Museum’s “History Sandwiched
    In” lecture series. The opinions expressed today
    are those of the presenters and are not necessarily those of the Wisconsin
    Historical Society or the museum’s employees. Jesse Gant is a PhD candidate
    in the Department of History at the University
    of Wisconsin-Madison and a Public Humanities Fellow with the Wisconsin
    Humanities Council. Today’s talk draws upon research he originally produced
    for his master’s thesis produced at New York University. His soon-to-be-completed
    dissertation will examine black
    activist efforts, including protests of
    the Fugitive Slave Act, and their impact on the
    rise of the Republican Party during the 1850s and 1860s. Here today to discuss Wisconsin’s Underground
    Railroad in History and Memory, please join me in
    welcoming Jesse Gant. (applause) – Thank you so much. It’s great to see
    such a packed house on a Tuesday afternoon
    in the middle of summer. It’s delightful to
    see you all here, and I look forward
    to sharing stories from Wisconsin’s
    Underground Railroad, a subject that I’ve
    been looking at and thinking about
    for quite some time, haven’t talked about
    publicly in quite a while, but looking forward
    to really diving in. I want to start off with a
    clip that was put together by the Wisconsin Media Lab
    on the life of Joshua Glover, one of the two, I
    think, most famous Underground Railroad
    escapes in state history. The Joshua Glover escape
    happened in March 1854, and it’s often paired with the
    rescue of Caroline Quarlls, a much earlier
    rescue that occurred in the state of
    Wisconsin in 1842. I think this clip
    just really magically and nicely encapsulates
    a lot of the themes and points that I would
    like to talk with you today. So, for the first
    five minutes or so, let’s take a look at this, and
    we’ll discuss it afterwards. ♪ Oh brother man ♪ Fold to thy heart thy brother ♪ Where pity dwells ♪ The peace of God is there ♪ To worship rightly ♪ Is to love each other ♪ Each smile a hymn ♪ Each kindly deed a prayer ♪ (somber instrumental music) (fire crackling) (groan) (whipping) (somber instrumental music) (loud drumming) (dogs barking and growling) (fast-paced drumming) (dogs barking and growling) (crowd talking) (gentle guitar music) (birds chirping) (gentle guitar music) (dogs barking) (ominous music) (dogs barking and growling) (somber instrumental music) (horse galloping) (horse neighs) (crowd booing) (dogs barking and growling) (door rammed) (dogs barking and growling) (ominous drumming) (crowd cheering) (gentle guitar music) So I think the clip you just
    saw really nicely introduces not only one of the key
    historical narratives, the rescue of Josh
    Glover in 1854, but a lot of the sort of
    motifs and architecture, the atmospherics that surround
    a lot of the ways that Underground Railroad
    stories are told in the state of
    Wisconsin and elsewhere. Today I want to talk
    about some of the pitfalls and some of the
    problems associated with ways we talk about the
    Underground Railroad in the state of Wisconsin. Obviously, it’s a very
    popular and accessible and much beloved
    subject in lots of ways. The room being so filled
    today with enthusiastic folks gives one piece of
    evidence of that. And we are, I think, in
    2015 standing at the cusp or at the apex, maybe,
    of a sort of resurgent Underground Railroad story
    that since the early 1990s has really captivated
    new public audiences. But what are these stories? How are they really functioning? And what sort of meanings
    are they really embedding? And I want to kind of take
    the next 45 minutes or so and sort of establish
    some critical space around the Underground Railroad
    stories as they function in our state’s sense of itself. I think one of the key projects
    of kind of restoring a more usable and interesting idea
    of the Underground Railroad is maybe beginning
    with a definition. When we’re talking about
    the Underground Railroad, when I say we, I mean
    professional historians, but anybody in the
    world of doing education and programming around
    Underground Railroad stories, including places like the
    Wisconsin Historical Society, we actually mean a
    very specific thing. It’s a term that developed
    in the late 1830s and became popular increasingly
    in the 1840s and 1850s. So it’s really just two
    decades before the Civil War when this term sort
    of gains currency in a lot of the publications
    and newspapers of the era. It’s a process or a system. Most often it’s thought
    of as this kind of vast clandestine network by which
    activists, black and white, throughout the North
    increasingly brought
    their energies and wisdom to bear on
    bringing down slavery. That’s a convenient
    idea maybe, but it’s, in the case of Wisconsin’s
    Underground Railroad stories, not entirely accurate. I mean, I think we have to
    recover a sense that a lot of these rescues
    were very spontaneous and sort of happenstance
    episodes that did not involve necessarily institutional
    or systemic alliances of black and white
    activists operating throughout the
    North at the time. Certainly, we can access and,
    I think, talk about a systemic resistance to slavery through
    the Underground Railroad, especially when we look
    at black communities and free black
    Northerners especially, particularly communities in
    Boston, Philadelphia, New York, some of the more entrenched
    and bigger populations on the East Coast. But here in the West and particularly in a
    place like Wisconsin, which had the smallest
    population of free
    black Northerners both regionally and
    throughout the north of the Western
    states at the time, it’s kind of a
    difficult discussion
    to have when there are not a lot of the institutions
    and free newspapers, churches, and other sort of institutions
    that were so important to free black
    politics at the time. I think we’ve also gained
    in the last few decades, in the last 50 years
    especially, a much broader sense of the geography of the
    Underground Railroad. We tend to think, and the
    video really, I think, really nicely encapsulated
    this, but we tend to think of a certain trajectory that
    leads directly out of the South to the Northern states
    and then to Canada. But historians have become
    much more sensitive and aware, I think, of the varieties of
    paths that led out of the South and increasingly, and I
    think most importantly, a lot of flight happened
    within the South itself to maroon colonies, to
    the swamps of Louisiana, to the Western
    frontier, to Florida. There were a variety of
    different options, I think. Options is a problematic
    term, maybe, in a context like slavery, but I think
    some sense of the ways that people could escape to sea, using the shipping routes
    like Frederick Douglass with his famous, probably
    his most famous escape in US history in the 1840s, and the varieties of geographies
    that are sort of implicated in Underground Railroad stories. The last point I would
    like to make is that really Northerners, Southerners,
    Westerners, a variety of people use the term the Underground
    Railroad in different ways, so it’s not always
    and immediately this
    sort of uplifting story of fugitive
    slave resistance. A lot of Southerners looked
    at it as a vast conspiracy of, you know, trouble-making
    abolitionists up North. Westerners would kind of look
    at it as a way to maybe remove troubling or problematic black
    populations and their ideas. So there isn’t a lot of
    rhetoric that, you know, African-Americans actually
    belong in the West among a lot of the activists who
    are involved in these rescues, so it does have this
    kind of problematic idea depending on the perspective and depending on the
    geography you’re located in. I really love this graphic
    from 1861, interestingly. The Civil War is already
    underway and the Census Office produces a map showing you where enslaved populations
    are most dominant. And I like to point this
    out in the discussion of Wisconsin’s
    Underground Railroad
    because, as you can see, the enslaved populations
    in the US South really are concentrated on
    a large belt that extends from northern Virginia on
    down through the deep South to eastern Texas. And then you have this
    massive population of Mississippi Delta
    enslaved populations. This is kind of the
    biggest population, the biggest concentration
    of enslaved people by the time of the Civil War. And these laborers are really
    working in a plantation system that has developed a very strong
    police apparatus around it, so people who are
    located in the Delta working in northern Virginia don’t have a lot of options
    actually for escape. It’s a very difficult
    proposition. I think there’s a
    lot of rhetoric in Underground Railroad stories
    and in the video we just saw that there’s somehow a choice
    or some sort of ability that you could just kind
    of flee whenever you liked. But in Wisconsin’s examples,
    if you look at the populations of northern Kentucky
    along the Ohio River, these are groups of people
    who are frequently crossing the Ohio into the state of
    Ohio, where they’re actually working as coerced
    laborers under contracts, even as slaves. And then another
    important population here north of the Missouri River,
    in and around St. Louis, and that’s called
    Missouri Slave Belt, which is another really
    important population for the discussion in
    the state of Wisconsin. and I think it’s
    really important to
    point out that these are groups of people located
    on kind of the most important interior waterways in
    North America, right? You have the Ohio River here, the Mississippi River flowing
    northward towards Minnesota, and these provide
    ready-made routes of escape for both Quarlls and Glover. Glover and Quarlls are
    located in St. Louis and make their way northward
    via the Mississippi River. I like to point that out just
    to kind of give you a sense of the geography
    and the limitations,
    actually, that faced a lot of enslaved
    Southerners at the time. By the early 1840s there’s
    already sort of a system of representations of
    the Underground Railroad that have emerged that
    are quite literally taking the system as a
    literal underground railroad, disappearing under the hills like the “Chicago Western
    Citizen” here in 1844, which gives you one of the
    first actual representations in a newspaper of the Liberty
    Line, as it was called, making its way underneath
    the mountain system and speeding people
    off to the North. But if you look
    at the description
    underneath this image, it’s actually loaded with
    a lot of racist assumptions about these sort of hapless
    people who have no agency or control or sense, even,
    where they’re heading or what they’re doing
    on the Liberty Line. So it’s a very, you know,
    complicated racial politics playing out in a lot
    of the representations of the Underground Railroad,
    at the earliest stages anyway. As I mentioned, there are two
    stories that kind of dominate discussions in the
    state of Wisconsin: the Joshua Glover
    rescue in 1854, the rescue of Caroline
    Quarlls in 1842. We actually do have an
    image of Benammi Garland, the master, the owner
    of Joshua Glover, from the Missouri
    History Museum, and the clipping
    showing the $200 reward for Joshua Glover’s return. I also wanted to include the
    poster for the mass convention that was organized in the
    state of Wisconsin following the Glover rescue in 1854. 1854 is kind of this
    really important moment in the anti-slavery
    movement’s history because of the
    Kansas-Nebraska Act, which is being debated in
    Congress in January and March, January, February, and
    March predominantly, in the early part of that year. It’s really in that context
    that the Glover rescue happens and sort of animates
    a lot of the attention in the state of Wisconsin. Quarlls is the sort
    of lesser known and lesser understood
    rescue that happens. She actually escaped
    slavery by purchasing a ticket on a
    steamship for $100, sorta contrary to all the
    typical or traditional notions of how Underground
    Railroad escapes happened, and sailed via steamship
    to the state of Wisconsin and spent some time in
    Waukesha, Wisconsin, where the rumor was
    that bounty hunters were in the region and were
    in active pursuit of her. And Waukesha activists
    led by a fellow named Lyman Goodnow
    organized to have her escape through southern Wisconsin,
    northern Illinois, Indiana, and then over
    to Detroit, Michigan, following a fairly
    typical trajectory for Underground Railroad escapes
    through the state of Wisconsin. We think that there were
    probably about 100 rescues that happened in the
    state, but the two, Glover and Quarrlls’s,
    are the most famous and the most talked about. And I mentioned at the
    beginning that I think we’re in kind of a moment that’s really
    important for rethinking and gaining some
    critical appreciation for the Underground Railroad. And I can historicize it a
    little bit and sort of explain how this all came about. In 1998, the National
    Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Act passed,
    and this provided, really importantly,
    support to a variety of public history initiatives
    throughout the United States to sort of raise awareness
    and raise the visibility of Underground
    Railroad destinations. It had a really profound impact. I think we can all speak and
    think about maybe examples we’ve been to or
    places we’ve been. Racine, Wisconsin, has
    monuments in its downtown Monument Square commemorating
    the beginning part of the Joshua Glover rescue
    that received some funding from the National Underground
    Railroad Network
    to Freedom Bill. But this really created
    a sort of proliferation of Underground Railroad
    destinations and publications and attentions around this
    topic that has been really quite influential and, I
    think, a welcome development, but one that we
    need to think about here in the state of Wisconsin. Since 1998, then, we’ve seen,
    maybe, I think it’s certainly related that we’ve seen a
    proliferation of scholarship, both public and, if we
    want to draw a line between popular scholarship and
    academic scholarship, we can, popular works on Caroline
    Quarlls for kids. A lot of this, sort of,
    is marketed initially to a younger audience,
    certainly the video we watched at the top of the discussion
    for fourth graders, I think. A new biography of Joshua
    Glover published by the Wisconsin Historical
    Society Press. So there has been a kind
    of resurgence in interest in these subjects, including,
    I think, a really interesting scholarly study
    by H. Robert Baker on the Joshua Glover rescue, and actually the first
    one ever published. So this has all been part
    of the rising interest in the state throughout
    these discussions. I came to the
    Underground Railroad, and I was actually first
    initiated to the subject as a student in the
    Janesville public schools, and we toured the Milton House,
    which many of you may know has a tunnel underneath the
    home where apparently folks were shepherded or hid in the
    times when marshals would come and do inspections or be on
    the search for runaway slaves. It has been accredited through the National Underground
    Railroad Freedom
    Network funding, and along with Racine, I think
    Loom is kind of the biggest places where actually
    the landscape, the
    physical landscape of the state of Wisconsin
    has markers and memorials commemorating the rescues. I would add to that
    the recent murals in the city of Milwaukee. These are at I-43 and
    Fond du Lac Avenue, just underneath the underpass, that commemorate the Quarlls
    and Glover rescue again. On the top left
    there is an image showing Goodnow and Quarlls. Goodnow is actually
    supporting her hand and pointing for
    her, in some sense, in the direction of freedom. It’s incorporated these
    sort of folklore motifs of the quilts that you
    may be familiar with, this sort of legend
    of fugitive slaves using embedded symbols inside
    quilts and other symbols to navigate their way northward. And the Glover rescue
    kind of borrows a lot of civil rights
    icons, the placards, the “Free Joshua Glover Now,”
    and again kind of plays on this idea of a benevolent
    white Milwaukee community really, literally uplifting
    Joshua Glover here and again raising his
    arm in these murals. A lot of these images and
    ideas first originated with the publication of “Uncle Tom’s
    Cabin” in the early 1850s. The famous escape of Eliza
    in the beginning part of that novel really, I think,
    captured and framed a lot of the ways people think
    about fugitive slaves’ escape. Throughout time, since the
    1850s, you begin to see a kind of recycling a
    lot of these images. And so whether or not
    Harriet Beecher Stowe actually included some of
    the motifs in her novel, you begin to start to see,
    especially in the 1880s and 90s, the incorporation of bloodhounds
    and sort of trappings of the familiar tale that we
    saw at the top of the hour in the Glover video. I think one really
    important turning point was the 1893 Chicago World’s
    Fair, where Charles T. Webber unveiled a really
    iconic painting at the Chicago World’s
    Fair showing fugitives making their way northward,
    and this was actually viewed by a young Ohio State
    historian for the first time at the Chicago Fair,
    named Wilbur Siebert. Wilbur Siebert was active
    during the 1890s collecting testimonials from Underground
    Railroad conductors, as he called them, throughout
    the North who were then sending in letters and
    soliciting, and he was providing space for them to share
    their stories about their involvement in rescues. Tellingly, I think,
    Siebert collects about 5,000 letters or so from
    Underground Railroad conductors in the North, and most
    of them are white men who have kind of written
    in and shared their stories about involvement in the
    Underground Railroad. And I think Siebert is very
    uncritical about what to do with those narratives and
    nonetheless crafts, I think, a really important history in
    1898 that, among other things, maps the actual
    routes of the escapes. So, again, you see a real
    hardening or a real sense that the routes were real, that
    there was this kind of vast Underground Railroad
    network that activists, black and white, maintained
    throughout this period. And I think we have to keep
    in mind as we’re considering these stories and the way
    that the Underground Railroad was popularized, that there has
    been always parallel to that sort of more traditional view, a view of the Underground
    Railroad that emerges sort of organically out
    of the black community. William Still’s really
    interesting account from 1872 is based largely on his
    experiences as leader of the Philadelphia Vigilance
    Committee, which in contrast to a lot of the rescues,
    and especially the rescues in the state of Wisconsin,
    does emerge out of that much stronger
    institutional background for black politics
    in Philadelphia. And so the Philadelphia
    Vigilance Committee actually did institutionally provide
    weapons, food, clothing, and other sorts of support
    for fugitive slaves that made their way through the city, and that’s typically
    not the story historians or popularizers of the
    Underground Railroad really emphasize. This really interesting
    painting from 1862, I think, also captures a dynamic of
    the Underground Railroad that we tend to overlook. This is a war-time
    representation of
    a fugitive family fleeing from the South
    during the Civil War. So we think of the
    underground railroad as this sort of thing that existed
    prior to the Civil War but didn’t have a life
    once the war started. Some really interesting
    scholarship by a woman named Thavolia Glymph has
    illustrated that, actually, some of the greatest numbers
    of escapes actually happened during the war and
    involved some of the most dangerous and highest stakes. And this painting, I think,
    really brilliantly captures, you can’t see it very well,
    but you can see a line of Union troops advancing
    right behind this family at the Battle of Manassas. And so the conflict of the
    Civil War really finally opened up space from
    which people could actually escape the system
    beyond the slave patrols and the other police apparatus that were so powerful
    under slavery. This is the language
    that is published in the Wisconsin Historical
    Society Press biography of Joshua Glover’s
    “Finding Freedom” in 2007. I won’t read the entire
    passage but I think it really nicely, again,
    sort of gives you a window into how the Underground
    Railroad has become this kind of place where we
    want to speak to a variety of ways of bringing together
    all these various facets of our sort of
    conflicted racial moment. So in this depiction, which
    happens right at the beginning of the Joshua Glover biography, there’s certainly sensitivity
    to the broad geography of the Underground Railroad,
    but then there’s this kind of reach or this
    idea that everybody, Indian nations, Canadians,
    Caribbeans, were all sort of united in this struggle,
    which raises the question, well how did slavery
    endure if so many people were active in trying
    to undermine it? Also this move at the end
    here to unite refugees from the American Revolution
    all the way to the Vietnam War, again, kind of speaks to this
    idea that it’s the ready-made, it’s the perfect story
    for the time and place we’re in right now, but
    whether it’s a critical or usable story for history’s
    sake remains to be seen. The Milton House for a
    long time used to have promotional materials
    that said nobody needed a ticket to travel the
    Underground Railroad, just a deep desire for freedom, which raises again some
    troubling assumptions because if you just needed,
    you know, a deep desire for freedom, why didn’t
    everybody escape? The best estimate is
    that 250, maybe 300, maybe 400,000 people
    escaped slavery in the years before 1860. There were four million enslaved
    people in the United States by the time of the Civil War,
    so we are always talking about a very, very small population, and it’s important to keep
    that in mind, I think. I think the most famous example
    of a fugitive slave escape, just to kind of give you
    a sense of the kind of standard account and a
    biography that really looms large over this history,
    is Frederick Douglass, and if you think about the
    example of Frederick Douglass. I mean this is a very
    exceptional character. He learned how to read and
    write while being enslaved. He lived in a geography that
    enabled him to kind of access shipping routes and
    access white families and white allies in ways
    that were not unique, and he was actually one of
    the leading critics of the way that white Westerners talked
    about the Underground Railroad. In the 1845 narrative that
    really launched his career as an anti-slavery activist, he
    said that he had never approved of the very public manner
    in which some of our western friends conducted what they
    call the Underground Railroad, and he really speaks to
    this kind of tension about what sort of work is
    the Underground Railroad really doing in the sense of
    the sort of traditional way. The 1850 Fugitive Slave Act
    was the sort of dominant mobilizing catalyst for a lot
    of fugitive slave activity during the 1850s, and it
    really touches off, I think, the most dramatic rescues and efforts of the decade
    before the Civil War. And, again, I think we have
    to really insist on a regional and state-wide history that
    really focuses on the efforts of free black Northerners if
    we’re really going to get at what made the Underground
    Railroad significant. And regionally, I would point
    to places like Cincinnati, Ohio, or Oberlin, Ohio,
    as places where a lot of these histories
    can really be focused. Wisconsin’s examples are so
    marginal and sort of far-flung that they don’t get us very
    close to what the Underground really meant regionally
    or nationally. Nonetheless, and I
    think predictably,
    we tend to associate Underground Railroad stories
    in Wisconsin more with the white activists than
    we do with the black people who actually were
    implicated in the rescues. So Sherman Booth, for example,
    the kind of leading activist involved in the Joshua
    Glover rescue from 1854 had a street named after him
    in Milwaukee during the 1850s, but it wasn’t until
    1994 that Joshua Glover got a street named
    after him in Milwaukee by Milwaukee high
    school students. The Rescue of Joshua Glover
    plaque in Cathedral Square, right behind there is
    actually where the rescue originally happened, again,
    sort of plays up the role of the mediating
    white abolitionists
    playing the heroic role at the expense of kind of we don’t get a very
    good sense of what happened to Glover and what his life in
    Canada was like, for example. And there’s a tendency, I
    think, with a lot of the work around the Underground Railroad
    in the state of Wisconsin to kind of misplace the place
    of anti-slavery in the state. So you have language like
    this which accompanies the mural text that says,
    “The state of Wisconsin “was attractive to those
    who escaped slavery. “Abolitionists and others
    in Wisconsin were leaders “in the fight against slavery.” I think one of the problems
    and one of the key themes that you really encounter when you
    look at black politics from the period 1840s and 1850s,
    there’s profound ambivalence about the Western states
    in black newspapers and in all sorts of black
    publications on account of the Black Laws, which are these
    sort of systemic restrictions that, first of all,
    were aimed at limiting immigration into the state. The State of Ohio
    imposed a $500 bond just to even move there
    in its state constitution in 1802 and 1803. You know, the state of
    Wisconsin never allowed black suffrage until
    after the Civil War. So black activists and black
    leaders are always sort of questioning just
    where is this identity as a good anti-slavery
    state really coming from? It’s often coming from
    white anti-slavery activists who do not necessarily
    have a benevolent idea of racial politics in mind. They might be anti-slavery, but that doesn’t
    make them pro-black. Lyman Goodnow, for example,
    and this is a really telling document, I think, in 1808. After the Civil War, a lot
    of these anti-slavery leaders and abolitionist participants, and I use abolitionists in
    quotes, wrote publications or wrote testimonies to fill
    county histories and sort of local histories and filled
    their accounts, actually, with accounts that I
    think should trouble us. Caroline Quarlls, this is
    him describing his role in the rescue in 1880. “The first slave transported
    over the Underground Railroad “from this region was
    probably an octoroon. “She had thin lips, straight
    nose, and was not very dark, “which probably accounted for
    her being able to escape from “St. Louis, where she was
    owned by an aunt, a Mrs. Hall. “Caroline obtained some
    money, got permission “from her mistress
    to visit a friend, “and taking a bundle
    of clothes with her, “which she had dropped
    from her window, “she took to a steamboat
    at Alton, Illinois.” And in fact, if you
    look at the letters that Wisconsin activists sent to
    Wilbut Siebert in the 1880s, they’re filled with very
    disparaging racial comments and frequently used
    racial epithets. So these are the people who
    presumably toppled slavery and worked actively in
    the anti-slavery movement, but they’re also, you know,
    announcing the most vicious white supremacy
    in their accounts. Here’s the mural in River
    West, Wisconsin, that shows you the new mural for Joshua
    Glover, which went up in 1994, but for, again, a long time
    that street was named for, was intersected actually, with
    the street for Sherman Booth. There are also these sites
    around the state of Wisconsin that sort of have
    these connections to the Underground Railroad. I was a tour guide
    for a long time at the Lincoln-Tallman
    Restorations in Janesville, this is a house where Abraham
    Lincoln slept one weekend, and it’s been making money
    off of it ever since. You know, you think
    about the 16th President of the United States,
    Abraham Lincoln, probably the greatest
    president we’ve ever had, the epicenter of a war
    that cost 750,000 lives, saw the emancipation
    of the slaves, any number of things that
    Lincoln was entangled in: creation of the national parks,
    it goes on and on and on. It’s just a
    remarkable presidency. That story has really
    been shoved aside actually over time as people came
    to the Tallman House, beginning in the 1880s and
    90s, as Tallman’s sons started writing some of
    these reminiscences
    that said, you know, our father was involved in
    the Underground Railroad. And as these stories made
    their way into newspapers and into accounts, I, as a tour
    guide, as a young teenager, heard a lot of people
    come to me and say, “You know that’s great, that’s
    interesting about Lincoln, “but tell me about the
    Underground Railroad,” which was always very
    interesting to me because there is absolutely
    no evidence that this house was a station on the
    Underground Railroad. As a kind of nosy young student, I spent a lot of
    time in the archives. And it’s actually been a
    tension among administrators at the Rock County Historical
    Society and their relationship to the Milton House
    up a few miles north. They’ve never been
    able to find evidence that that actually occurred, and there’s been
    periodic digs on site by the University of
    Wisconsin-Madison, I think most recently in 2011,
    where they’ve sent geologists out to find that tunnel
    that apparently existed between the river and the
    house, and it’s never turned up. This isn’t to say that I
    think we need to dismiss all Underground Railroad
    stories or that there has to be some sort of factual
    basis necessarily. I think the sort of folklore
    and the legend around Underground Railroad stories
    is interesting on its own, but it raises a lot of problems if there’s just no
    evidence for it. – So how was it that
    that story came to be? What’s your sense of that? – Yeah, that’s been
    widely discussed, and that’s an
    interesting phenomenon. David Blight, a historian
    at Yale, has argued that in the 1880s and 90s
    anti-slavery activists, feeling like the centrality
    of slavery to the Civil War was being pushed aside in
    the culture of the Union, invented a notion of
    alternative veteran-hood. So they saw all these
    veterans, Union veterans, being celebrated culturally and saw slavery being pushed
    out of the story as a result, felt that the Underground
    Railroad was the place where they could
    make a claim about slavery’s significance
    to the war. And so they started writing
    all these stories to say well this war was
    all about slavery, and we sacrificed our
    lives and our situations to really bring the war about,
    so you see a proliferation in the 1880s and 90s of
    these sorts of accounts. In Tallman’s example it’s his
    son, who, for whatever reason, I think that’s a really
    interesting question why he would do that, but
    I think there must’ve been some reason as to, you know,
    restoring his father’s legacy or his identity, or even,
    more cynically, you know, preserving the house,
    keeping it from destruction and falling into disrepair. Just sort of raises this idea. It’s very clear in the archive at the Rock County Historical
    Society in Janesville. If you go to it, you can see
    the sort of invention of this myth in the post-war years,
    and you see references to it, actually, all the way up
    through the 1950s and 60s. I mean, it’s repeatedly
    referred to as an Underground
    Railroad destination. It’s part of the
    marketing for the house at the expense of
    Abraham Lincoln’s story, which is phenomenal even
    though it’s one weekend. That’s the only house in
    the state of Wisconsin where Lincoln stayed, so in
    that sense it does have a viable and interesting story
    attached to it that has sort of been pushed
    aside over the years. The real impetus for a lot of
    the revision that’s happened around the Underground Railroad. I’ve been talking about this
    kind of revisionist history of the Underground Railroad and the increased
    critical stance toward it really originated with this
    interesting account called “The Liberty Line”,
    written by a PhD graduate here at Madison
    named Larry Gara. And this was 50 years ago. So while academic historians
    have really been critical, and I think, in developing
    some space around the Underground Railroad and
    rethinking its imperatives, popular historians and more
    secondary education historians especially have, I think, been
    slow to kind of pick up on some of the interventions
    that have been made in the academic scholarship. Just doesn’t have a
    lot of evidence for it. It kind of relies on some
    questionable research. And then the book on the right, Betty DeRamus’s
    “Forbidden Fruit”, actually tries to make
    the experience of slavery in the United
    States a love story. So, I think, tellingly,
    the blurb for the book says “haunting, riveting,
    always triumphant.” So, you know, how you turn
    an experience like slavery in the United States
    into a triumphant tale is quite exceptional, I think. The National Underground
    Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, has emerged
    since 2004 when it opened, is a kind of new front, and it’ll be interesting
    to see where, I included this slide because
    I think it’s going to be interesting to see where
    a lot of these discussions about the Underground
    Railroad go because it was driven
    in part by the funding and the new attention based
    on that 1998 legislation that really made the
    Underground Railroad highly visible culturally
    and politically. It opened the year
    of the Kerry and Bush presidential contest. Both presidents came,
    they shook hands, they participated
    in the ceremony. This is again, speaks to
    the way that the Underground Railroad seems to unite all
    sorts of political coalitions. Everybody loves the
    Underground Railroad, no matter what political
    background you’re from. But I think in the
    years since 2004, and 2005 especially, we’ve entered a period where
    as the Underground Railroad has become much more popular, and there are actually
    yearly conferences and a proliferation of
    sites and new books, I think there is a kind of
    rising sensibility that, while the Underground
    Railroad has become so popular as a children’s and
    youth discussion, it’s time for adults to get
    real and start talking about some of the racial and
    broader political motivations behind a lot of these stories. So, with that, I’m happy
    to answer your questions and lead this
    discussion forward. Thank you. (applause)

    Sen. Baldwin announces railroad crossing safety upgrades
    Articles, Blog

    Sen. Baldwin announces railroad crossing safety upgrades

    August 18, 2019


    WEATHERWATCH 12 FORECAST. SHELDON: THANKS A LOT, CHRIS. PEDESTRIAN AND RAILROAD CROSSINGS IN SOUTHEAST WISCONSIN ARE ABOUT TO GET SAFER. U.S. SENATOR TAMMY BALDWIN AND THE HEAD OF THE FEDERAL RAILRO ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCED THAT A $3 MILLION GRANT WILL BE USED TO IMPROVE SAFETY AT CROSSINGS IN WAUKESHA COUNTY. CREWS WILL ADD MORE LIGHTS AND GATES AT 10:00 CROSSINGS ALONG A 10-MILE STRETCH. THERE WILL ALSO BE A PEDESTRIA PATH AND CROSSING. RAIL CROSSINGS THAT ALREADY HAVE TWO GATES WILL GET TWO MORE TO INCREASE SAFETY. SARAH FEINBERG: SO THIS GRANT WILL GO A LONG WAY TO EQUI CROSSINGS TO PREVENT VEHICLES FROM TRYING TO MAKE IT INTO THE PATH OF A TRAIN, ESPECIALLY TRAINS TRANSPORTING CRUDE OIL, AND IT MOVES US CLOSER TO ACHIEVING THE GOAL REDUCING FATALITIES AT RAILROAD CROSSINGS. SHELDO AFTER THIS MORNING’S ANNOUNCEMENT IN PEWAUKEE, RAILROAD ADMINISTRATOR SARAH FEINBERG AND SENATOR BALDW WALKED TO THE OAKTON AVENUE RAILROAD AS A TRAIN CAME THROUGH.

    Articles

    Railroad crossings in St. Francis reopen after Tuesday derailment

    August 15, 2019


    THAT IS A LOOK AT THE MORNING COMMUTE. BACK TO YOU. THANK YOU. WE’RE FOLLOWING BREAKING NEWS THIS MORNING. YES, IT WAS A MESS THERE. THE DAMAGED TRAIN TOWED AWAY FROM THE SCENE AN HOUR AGO. WE HAVE A MAP SHOWING YOU THE IMPACTED AREA. IT’S BORDERED BY ST. FRANCIS AVENUE TO THE NORTH AND VAN NORMAN AVENUE TO THE SOUTH. HILLARY IS LIVE AT ONE OF THE INTERSECTIONS. WE ARE HERE AT IOWA AND ST. FRANCIS AVENUE. THIS IS WHERE THE DERAILMENT HAPPENED. THESE CROSSING BARS WERE ABLE TO GO BACK UP THIS MORNING AND PEOPLE HAVING NO PROBLEM. ALL THOUGH LAST NIGHT, IT WAS PROBABLY THE WORST POSSIBLE TIME. IT WAS DURING THE EVENING RUSH THERE. IT WAS A MESS HERE. THE CREWS SPENT THE ENTIRE NIGHT TRYING TO GET THE TRAIN OFF THE TRACKS. AT ONE POINT THEY WERE USING A CUTTING TORCH AND CREATING SPARKS, THE CRASH AND CLEAN UP BLOCKED THE INTERSECTIONS AND CLOSING 2 MILES OF ROAD AND THE NEIGHBORS HEARD THE LOUD CRASH, BUT TO WHAT HAPPENED OR THE CAUSE, THAT IS UNDER INVESTIGATION THIS MORNING AND REALLY THE GOOD NEWS, THEY ARE

    Wauwatosa officials looking at railroad crossing safety
    Articles, Blog

    Wauwatosa officials looking at railroad crossing safety

    August 13, 2019


    WISN 12 NEWS TIME IS 6:04. BACK TO YOU. SOUNDING THE ALARM ABOUT SAFETY AT ONE OF THE STATE’S BUSIEST RAILROAD CROSSINGS. THESE TRACKS MIGHT LOOK FAMILIAR TO YOU. IT’S THE CROSSING NEAR 68TH AND STATE, IN WAUWATOSA. OFFICIALS ARE LOOKING AT OPTIONS FOR HOW TO KEEP PEOPLE SAFE, AFTER ANOTHER DEATH ON THE TRACKS. RIGHT NOW, TRAINS IN WAUWATOSA ARE NOT REQUIRED TO SOUND THEIR HORNS UNLESS THERE’S AN EMERGENCY. THE CITY SAYS THE QUIET ZONE WILL BE REVIEWED IF ANY FORMAL COMPLAINTS OF SAFETY CONCERNS

    Railroad offers some explanation for train horns in a quiet zone
    Articles, Blog

    Railroad offers some explanation for train horns in a quiet zone

    August 8, 2019


    KEEP THAT POCKET DAY. RESIDENTS ARE ANGRY ABOUT LOUD TRAINS IN THE QUIET ZONE. WE ARE GETTING SOME ANSWERS AS TO WHY IT IS HAPPENING. WE INVESTIGATE TODAY THE INSTANCES WHERE THE HORNS WILL CONTINUE TO SOUND. [HORNS] CANADIAN PACIFIC SAYS THE MONTH-LONG INVESTIGATION REVEALS THAT ITS TRAINS ARE WELL WITHIN THE LAW TO BLOW THEIR HORNS LOUD AND CLEAR EVEN INSIDE THE QUIET ZONE. A SPOKESMAN TELLS WEALTH NEWS BY PHONE, THEY ARE PRONE TO FREQUENT TRESPASSING AND SCHEDULED TRACK MAINTENANCE WORK. IT IS A RECURRENCE THAT INVOLVES PEOPLE WHO WERE ON THE TRACK, THE SOUND THE WHISTLE TO ALERT THE PEOPLE. BUT FOR SOME PEOPLE WHO HAVE BEEN COMPLAINING ABOUT THE LOUD WHISTLE, THAT RESPONSE DOES NOT HOLD WATER. IT IS REAL LOUD. I DON’T THINK IT IS NECESSARY. DIFFICULTLY TAKE THE BUS RIGHT NEXT TO THE TRACKS. ANOTHER LADY WHO DOES NOT WANT TO BE IDENTIFIED SAYS SHE HAS BEEN LIVING HERE FOR 27 YEARS AND THINKS THE RAILROAD IS RIGHT TO SOUND THE ALARM BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE TRESPASSING. I HAVE WATCHED PEOPLE GO AROUND THE BARRICADE AND GET HIT BY TRAINS BECAUSE THEY WERE IN A HURRY. I DON’T SEE ANY REASONS WHY THE TRAINS CAN BE BLOWING. THE MAYOR IS OUT OF TOWN UNTIL NEXT WEEK. THEY ARE REVIEWING THE INVESTIGATION I CANADIAN PACIFIC AND WILL MAKE A DECISION LATER ABOUT WHAT TO DO.