Browsing Tag: was

    Hayley Millar-Baker – 2018 Melbourne Art Trams
    Articles, Blog

    Hayley Millar-Baker – 2018 Melbourne Art Trams

    October 15, 2019


    My name is Hayley Millar-Baker, I’m a
    Gunditjmara woman, and I’m a photographic artist. I was 5 years old when I decided
    that I was going to be an artist, and that was with the help of my prep teacher, who was an Aboriginal woman as well, I just, was so encouraged that I
    thought that I could literally do this for the rest of my life. I got into photography when I inherited my late grandfather’s negatives and slides and
    from there I just started playing with them and creating new narratives. So the inspiration behind my Art Tram design is, my family, their Aboriginality,
    their struggles and their triumphs, I think just sharing our story is what makes
    everything worthwhile to me for my practise. Oh my god I’m getting really nervous. Oh wow, this is full-on, it looks amazing! The story on the tram is a story of my mother, adventuring through country with a
    band of animals behind her following her, which are totems, the rocks I’ve
    taken from Lake Condah, which is where my family lived for sixty thousand years.
    I’ve positioned them so she will be going forward not just over the rocks, but all through Melbourne as the tram moves. I hope that the children really like it, for the animals and I hope that adults
    reminisce about times in their life, and the Aboriginal think about their time out on country. I feel incredibly humbled, I just feel mind-blown, at this scale,
    it is outrageous, yeah I’m really, really happy.

    It was a huge mistake not to start bullet train construction in L.A. and San Francisco   Los Angeles
    Articles, Blog

    It was a huge mistake not to start bullet train construction in L.A. and San Francisco Los Angeles

    October 15, 2019


    It was a huge mistake not to start bullet train construction in L.A. and San Francisco Los Angeles To the editor: It was foolish to build Californias high speed rail system from its center outward toward the final terminals in the northern and southern parts of the state. , Feb. 12 Think if the builders of the transcontinental railroad had driven the Golden Spike at Promontory Summit in Utah to begin that railroad. That too would have been dumb. If California had started, at the same time, the Los Angeles northward tracks and the San Francisco southward section, then residents at both highly populated ends would have been able to use the partially completed service in order to sing its praises and create public support. Perhaps more intelligent people will prevail when the project starts back up so all of us can get a bang or a ride for our buck. Steve Saeta, Santa Rosa Valley, Calif. To the editor: I did not vote for Gov. Gavin Newsom, and in general I disagree with him on almost everything he advocates. However, his decision to cut back on the bullet train project provides at least a glimmer of hope that there may be at least some reasonableness coming from Sacramento after the long and costly obsession of former Gov. Jerry Brown with this project. Neal Rein, Westlake Village To the editor: I am saddened that Newsom is scaling back the high speed rail project. Yes, it is expensive, and yes, costs could have been managed better. On the other hand, its benefits would have paid tremendous dividends for residents who cannot afford Los Angeles expensive housing by allowing them to live in Lancaster or Bakersfield and work in the L.A. basin. A completed system would provide a great cost efficient alternative to air travel, especially to communities outside the San Francisco Bay Area. I wish that Newsom had looked at cutting some of the bureaucracy that increases the costs of public works and stopped wasting money on programs for undocumented residents. Jim Kennedy, Smyrna, Tenn. Follow the Opinion section on Twitter and

    Girl, 15, charged with murder in stabbing on Washington DC Metro train
    Articles, Blog

    Girl, 15, charged with murder in stabbing on Washington DC Metro train

    October 15, 2019


    A 15-year-old boy who was stabbed Friday on a Washington Metro train near the U.S Capitol has died and a 15-year-old girl has been charged with murder, D.C. police said Saturday Jaquar McNair, of Southeast D.C., succumbed to his injuries Saturday morning, Fox 5 Washington reported  ST. PAUL COP OFFERS ALLEGED SHOPLIFTER A BREAK, GETS STABBED: REPORT  Officers respond to Friday’s stabbing at the Capitol South Metro station (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)  Police found Jaquar bleeding and unconscious at the Capitol South Metro station at around 12:30 p m. Friday. The station is about a block from the Cannon House Office Building, where some House members have offices  Police said the attack arose from a dispute among a group of teenagers riding a Metro Orange Line train, but did not dis a specific motive  They said McNair was taken the hospital and underwent surgery. The teenage suspect was tracked down several blocks from the station and was arrested on an initial charge of assault with the intent to kill The charge was upgraded to first-degree murder while armed after McNair’s death. The girl was not identified because of her age  CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP The stabbing occurred at around the same time police announced an initiative to combat a surge in crime and homicides in the nation’s capital Police have investigated at least five homicides this week, including the fatal shooting of a man Friday afternoon  “I think we all need to pay attention to the violence going on in this city,” Metropolitan Police Department Chief Peter Newsham said Friday “The Metropolitan Police Department is going to do everything we possibly can to stop this violence ” CLICK FOR MORE FROM FOX5DC.COM. The Associated Press contributed to this report

    Commuter Connections –  Light Rail Turns 25
    Articles, Blog

    Commuter Connections – Light Rail Turns 25

    October 15, 2019


    – You were here at the
    start of Light Rail, what do you remember about
    the whole grand opening? – It was a lot of excitement. Baltimore was getting a
    brand new Light Rail system and getting a brand new stadium. Downtown was buzzing with people, lot of excitement, these two projects were
    the new Baltimore City, beside Inner Harbor, these two mega project was meant to turn Baltimore and make
    it a huge destination for a lot of people. – And what were some of the station stops on Light Rail when it first began? – We started the first city that opened inside of
    a Timonium fairground and the north end and Glen
    Burnie at the south end in between we had Mount Washington, I was stationed at Mount Washington helping with customers on opening day. – So looking over the past 25 years, how many people rode
    the Light Rail service when it was new versus how many ride it today? – When we opened the system, again, the system did not have the extensions that was added on to the
    system later on in 1997. In 1997, we added three more
    extensions to the system. One to Penn Station, one to BWI, and one to Hunt Valley. The system initially
    soughted about 20 thousand and gradually went up to, close to, 28, 29 thousand, and that’s where we are today. At about 27, 28 thousand riders a day.

    Deadly Crash In Northwest Miami-Dade Caught On Camera
    Articles, Blog

    Deadly Crash In Northwest Miami-Dade Caught On Camera

    October 15, 2019


    FOUR, AND BRETT KAVANAUGH WILL RESPOND TO THE ALLEGATIONS. AMBER DIAZ, CBS 4 NEWS TONIGHT. A VIOLENT AND DEADLY CAR CRASH IN MIAMI, A TERRIBLE ACCIDENT CAUGHT ON CAMERA, SURVEILLANCE VIDEO SHOWS A CAR PLOWING INTO A CONCRETE COLUMN AND DISINTEGRATING UPON IMPACT. LIVE FROM THE SCENE, WITH MORE OF THE STUNNING VIDEO. Reporter: DIANE, THAT CAR SLAMMED INTO THIS COLUMN BEHIND ME, RIGHT THERE, IN THE MIDDLE, YOU CAN SEE THAT THE COLUMN SUFFERED NO DAMAGE, BUT THE CAR WAS SPLIT IN HALF, SCATTERING PIECES EVERYWHERE, THE WHOLE THING WAS CAUGHT ON CAMERA. AN EXPLOSIVE AND VIOLENT SINGLE VEHICLE CRASH ON 75th STREET, CAUGHT ON SURVEILLANCE VIDEO IN NORTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, BARELY RECOGNIZABLE AFTER HITTING A COLUMN THAT SUPPORTS THE METRORAIL, THEN SPLITTING IN HALF AND DISINTEGRATING. HE WAS SPEEDING SAYS THIS MAN WHO WORKS NEARBY, HE SAYS HE HAD THE COLUMN, AND THAT THE SPEED HE WAS GOING, THE VEHICLE WAS LEFT IN PIECES. LOOK AT HOW THE PIECES ARE SCATTERED ALL OVER THE STREET SAYS THE MAN. IT IS FROM ONE SIDE OF THE SIDEWALK TO THE OTHER, THE ENGINE IS HERE, AND THE TRUTH — THE TRANSMISSION IS THERE. Reporter: YOU CAN SEE TWO CARS DRIVING IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION, BARELY MISSING THE MOMENT WHEN THE VEHICLE STRUCK THE COLUMN AND LANDED ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STREET, THIS MAN SAID HE DROVE UP RIGHT AFTER THE CRASH. IT PASSED OVER LIKE THIS, WITH AC PUT ON, BUT HE WAS BREATHING, BUT I GUESS HE FADED OUT FROM THE IMPACT. Reporter: THE VEHICLE WAS TOWED AWAY, BUT A LOT OF PARTS AND DEBRIS REMAINS, MARKING THE SPOT. IT WAS REALLY SCARY, MY STOMACH WAS BOILING IN EVERYTHING. Reporter: THE

    Exeter Tramway Company | Wikipedia audio article
    Articles, Blog

    Exeter Tramway Company | Wikipedia audio article

    October 15, 2019


    Tramways in Exeter were operated between 1882
    and 1931. The first horse-drawn trams were operated
    by the Exeter Tramway Company but in 1904 the Exeter Corporation took over. They closed the old network and replaced it
    with a new one powered by electricity.==History=====Horse era===An Act of Parliament was made in 1881 “for
    making tramways in the county of Devon to be called Exeter Tramways”. Under this the council gave 21 years of running
    powers over Exeter’s streets. The rights were assigned to a commercial company,
    The Exeter Tramway Company. This company was launched in 1881 when its
    prospectus was published in The Times. The directors were William Leigh Bernard,
    W. Standing, and WM Wood. The Manager and Inspector was SH Culley and
    the Secretary was J. Lord. The Exeter Tramway Company was formed at a
    meeting at the Black Horse Inn on Longbrook Street on 15 November 1881. Construction of the tramway began on 3 January
    1882 and it started horse-drawn tramway services in Exeter on 6 April 1882.Although the routes
    along Sidwell Street and Heavitree Road proved to be popular, the company’s failure to get
    permission for a line along Queen Street and High Street in the heart of the town made
    it difficult for the company to make a large operating surplus. This meant they were unable to expand the
    system or even keep the trams well maintained. As early as 1883 the company had difficulty
    in paying its mortgage and other debts. The company continued have financial difficulties
    and faced liquidation in 1888. The Company was subject to a Compulsory Winding
    Up Order dated 10 March 1888 and attempts by the Liquidator to find a buyer were unsuccessful. The Company was dissolved by the High Court
    on 7 August 1889. In 1892 it was taken over by the Tramway Purchase
    Syndicate and leased to Frederick Burt and Company. However, even under the new ownership, problems
    were ongoing. In 1893 Sunday services were suspended through
    the spring, and the route up the steep hill from Exeter St David’s into town was abandoned.By
    the start of the twentieth century, the 21 year life of the act which set up the system
    was coming to its end and the corporation had a right to purchase the business. In 1903 the Exeter Corporation Bill was passed
    in Parliament which gave the corporation the right to buy out the Exeter Tramway Company
    and construct a new system. The company and stock of the tramway was purchased
    by Exeter Corporation on 1 February 1904 for £6,749. Exeter Corporation Tramways built a new system
    of electric trams. The last horse-drawn tram ran on 4 April 1905. Going in front of the first electric tram
    service it travelled from the Guildhall and then along the High Street, down New North
    Road, to the tram shed and into retirement.===Electric era===
    From 1882 the Exeter Tramway Company had been operating a horse-drawn tramway service. The authority to run this service had been
    granted under a 21-year act, and so by 1900 the act was coming up for renewal. Two private companies approached the city
    council to seek permission to replace the horse trams with electric trams. However, the city council decided to investigate
    the possibility of running the trams services themselves. Members of the Tramways Committee went to
    visit other tram systems, including ones in London, Birmingham, Southampton and even going
    to France to visit systems in Paris, Rouen and Le Havre. The report prepared by the city surveyor and
    its electrical engineer supported the adoption of an overhead trolley system.In December
    1902 a poll of residents was taken on two questions – whether to present a Parliamentary
    Bill for the right to run the trams and whether the trams should run along the High Street. The first questions was approved with a 79%
    majority and the second with a majority of 75%. The previous horse tram system had been refused
    permission to run along the High Street. This was despite opposition from some local
    business leaders such as Charles Josiah Ross (owner of a local draper and outfitters shop)
    and other firms such as Hinton Lake the chemists and W.R. Lisle, jewellers.In 1903 a Bill was
    passed in Parliament for the right to buy out the Exeter Tramways Company and for the
    city to build and run a new system. The cost of setting up the electric tramways
    was £65,200. The cost included £6,800 to buy out the previous
    company and all the track, stock and horses. Construction of the tramways involved considerable
    disruption to the High Street with the road being dug up and a number of properties being
    demolished to make way for the trams. This led to St Petrocks Church being on the
    street frontage (having previously been hidden) and the demolition of its porch.The first
    test of the new electric trams took place on 24 March 1905 from the new depot at the
    end of Paris Street. The tram had just set off towards Livery Dole
    when all its lights went out. Fortunately this was found to simply be a
    minor problem with the engagement of the trolley arm and The Board of Trade Inspector approved
    the system.The official opening was on 4 April 1905 at 12.30. Five Trams were lined up outside the Guildhall,
    including the only horse tram ever to travel down the High Street. The first electric tram was driven by the
    Mayor who was presented with a silver tram handle. Once the tram had travelled to Livery Dole
    and back, the Mayor gave a speech from the top deck of the first tram. By June 1905 the trams were already carrying
    80,000 passengers per week. Special fares for workers were offered with
    cheaper fares for early morning and early evening travel.The first services only operated
    from the Guildhall to Mount Pleasant Inn and from St David’s to Livery Dole. By September 1906 however, the route crossing
    the bridge across the River Exe opened with a line out to Stone Lane in Alphington.There
    was considerable debate about whether to carrying advertising on the trams. Adverts on tickets was introduced from start
    but many members of council felt that it was not appropriate for a corporation owned service. It was only in 1920 that advertising was carried
    routinely on the trams.Although the trams continued to run during World War I, they
    faced severe difficulties. Almost 80% of the staff were involved with
    war service of some sort with 60% going to war overseas. Women were employed as conductresses but being
    a motorman (driver) was still seen as a man’s job. Due to lack of trained staff, the trams often
    did not run the full length of the line, leaving passengers to walk to their destinations. The frequency of the trams was reduced in
    January 1918 from one every eight minutes to one every nine minutes but the trams were
    still often late and overcrowded. Maintenance also became an issue both from
    lack of materials and money to pay for them. This lack of maintenance may have contributed
    to the only fatal accident that ever occurred on the trams. On 6 March 1917 a tramcar got out of control
    on Fore Street Hill. It collided with a lorry belonging to the
    London and South Western Railway. A Mrs. Mary Findlay was killed when the car
    left the rails and overturned.===Closure===
    By the late 1920s, traffic in the centre of Exeter was becoming an increasing problem
    – especially during the summer. The High Street was a major bottleneck as
    almost all the through traffic had to pass along it. All vehicles coming from Bath or Honiton and
    going towards Plymouth, Torquay or Okehampton had to go through the centre of town and across
    the Exe Bridge. Between 1920 and 1930 the number of motor
    vehicles travelling along the High Street each day increased from 1,314 to 5,901. Although some bypass road were built such
    as Prince of Wales Road and the Hill Barton bypass to Countess Wear, this did little to
    solve the problems. Part of the problem was perceived to be due
    to the trams – especially so, given the narrow streets of parts of Exeter and the large proportion
    of the system which was single track.The tramways committee first introduced bus services in
    1928 to serve areas which the trams did not go to. These motor buses were single deckers; Maudslay,
    Leyland and Bristols. The Maudslay ML3 no 5 (FJ6154)of this period
    is now preserved. After testing several different buses they
    eventually chose AEC Regent and Leyland TD2 double deckers (delivered in 1931). As the councillors could not decide whether
    to replace the trams completely with buses, they commissioned a report from an independent
    expert whose report was completed in April 1929. He found that there was a backlog of track
    renewals and other repairs, that the narrow streets were not suitable for trams and that
    at an average speed of 6.5 miles per hour (compared to 9.5 mph in London) the trams
    were slower than in any of 11 other cities. In council elections in November 1929, the
    Labour Party campaigned on a platform of keeping the trams but their vote declined. In 1930 the council finally decide to replace
    the trams with double-decker buses.In January 1931 the service along Alphington Road ended
    and the final trams ran on 19 August 1931. The last every tram was driven by Mr E.C.
    Perry who as mayor, had driven the first tram. The last tram, car 14, was followed by a double
    decker bus to usher in the new age. Mr E.C. Perry was presented with a silver-plated
    control handle and Mr Bradley, Chairman of the Transport Committee was presented the
    reverse lever which was also silver-plated and inscribed. One of the tramcars (No. 19) survived and
    was restored on the Seaton Tramway but as a single deck tram.==Routes=====Horse services===The system had 3 main routes radiating from
    just outside the East gate of the city. The first trams in 1882, ran from the Bude
    Hotel in London Inn Square to a stop on Heavitree Road near St Luke’s College and was extended
    to Livery Dole in May 1893. Two additional routes were introduced in 1893:
    one ran along New North Road, and then down St David’s Hill to the Railway station; th
    third route went to the end of Mount Pleasant Road via Sidwell Street and Blackboy Road. However, a plan to run trams along Queen Street
    and High Street then on to Barnfield was prevented by the opposition of shop owners on these
    streets and also by residents. A planned branch along Queen Street as far
    the Royal Albert Memorial Museum was never built. The depot was in a shed off New North RoadThe
    company also ran connecting horse-bus services which went to Alphington and Kennford, Pinhoe
    and Broadclyst, Topsham and to the end of Union RoadThere was a flat fare of 1d for
    a single journey, and 3d for a through journey which via London Inn Square.===Electric services===The electric trams expanded considerably the
    routes of the former horse tram. The most significant new route was the one
    which ran along the High Street, over the River Exe, on the bridge completed in 1905,
    and then divided into two with one branch which ran along Alphington Road as far as
    Stone Lane, and a second branch went to the top of Cowick Street. The route down Pinhoe Road now went to Abbey
    Road and that along Heavitree Road was extended through Heavitree (then outside the city boundary)
    to Cross Park. The section of the horse tram route along
    New North Road was not included in the new system.Once completed the system operated
    three routes: Cross Park Terrace (Heavitree) to Cowick Street,
    via Paris Street, High Street and the Exe Bridge. The symbol for this route was a white saltire
    cross on a red background. Abbey Road junction with Pinhoe Road to Stone
    Lane junction with Alphington Road, via Sidwell Street, High Street and the Exe Bridge. The symbol for this route was a green circle
    on a white background. Exeter St. David’s Station to Pinhoe Road
    via Hele Road. Some trams terminated at Queen Street. The symbol for this route was a white circle
    on a green background.===Proposed extensions===
    Several further extensions were proposed but none of them were ever built. The original agreed plans included the following
    additional routes: down Eastgate to Southernhay; down Longbrook Street and up to Pennsylvania
    Road; along Bonhay from Fore Street to St David’s station; along Denmark Road from Magdalen
    Street and one down South Street. To ensure the service remained profitable
    none of these were built. Later proposal for extensions included extensions
    of the Heavitee line and an extension from Pinhoe road to Whipton. The later proposal got approval for a loan
    from the Ministry of Transport but was never built.==Tram cars==The horse trams were built to 3 ft 6 in (1,067
    mm) gauge and the first ones were single deckers. Three trams were purchased from the Bristol
    Wagon & Carriage Works’ for the opening in 1882. The trams seated sixteen passengers on the
    inside with four more on the rear platform. The trams were yellow with chocolate brown
    lettering. Three more trams were bought 1883, when the
    complete network was opened and then two more in 1884. Around the mid-1890s, the company bought its
    first double decker trams, again from the Bristol Wagon and Carriage Work Company. A minimum of 6 of these were purchased along
    with a final single decker tram in a ‘toast-rack’ style. When the company was bought out, there were
    four remaining double decker trams and one single decker.Each tram was pulled by a team
    of two horses. They would be trained by local farmers, first
    by pulling carts and then moving on to the trams. After they were no longer able to pull the
    trams, they would be sold back to the farms for lighter work. There were several convictions of tram drivers
    for cruelty to the horses. At the end of horse-drawn tram services, there
    were twenty-two horses owned by the company which were sold off by Exeter Corporation
    for about £15 each.Over the whole of its existence, Exeter Corporation Tramways bought
    a total of 37 trams. These were numbered 1-24 (without a number
    13) in the first series and 1-4 in the second series. All were open top double deck trams with four
    wheels. Trams 1-21 were purchased between April 1905
    and August 1906 from Dick, Kerr & Co. of Preston. They had two 25 horsepower (19 kW) motors
    and had 42 seats, 20 on the lower and 22 on the upper deck. Nos 22-25, bought in December 1914 were the
    first purchased from Brush (as were all the later trams) and had two 34 horsepower (25
    kW) motors and seated 44. After World War I two new cars were purchased
    (26 and 27). These had seats for 54 passengers. Car 27 was the first to be fitted with an
    enclosed cab. Nos 28-30 were bought in 1925 and were followed
    by the last of the first series – no 31-34 in 1926. The last trams were purchased in 1929 (1-4
    of the new series) and were initially intended for the planned extension to Whipton. They had two General Electric 50 horsepower
    (37 kW) motors and could seat 53 people. They were delivered only months before the
    decision was made to bring an end to the tram services. In 1931 these four tramcars were sold to Halifax
    Corporation for £200 each. They ran there for a further 7 years until
    finally being withdrawn in November 1938.The livery of the trams was dark green and cream
    with gold lettering and a dark maroon under carriage.==Accidents==
    On 26 September 1885 the worst accident of the horse-tram era occurred when the brakes
    failed while a tram was going down St David’s Hill and it overturned. The horses and four passengers were injured.There
    was one fatal accident on the system on 17 March 1917 after a tram ran out of control
    down the steep hill of Fore Street, picking up speed and eventually overturning on Exe
    Bridge.==Power supplies==The power for the trams was provided by the
    newly municipalised City of Exeter Electricity Company who in 1904 had built a new power
    station at Haven Banks. The trams had the benefit for the company
    of providing a load during the daytime. The new power station was coal fired with
    generators made by British Westinghouse and with cabling installed in stone lined conduits
    by Siemens Brothers of London. It generated a total power of 1,300 kW AC
    output which was converted to DC at 500-550 V for the trams. The trams were supplied their power through
    a trolley system and most of the traction poles had side brackets included the ones
    which were part of the design of the Exe Bridge built in 1905. Some of the pole were also used for street
    lighting and it is still possible to see some of the bases of the poles, for example among
    the railings on Hele Road. The system was split into sections which could
    be isolated and were powered independently. So that problems could be reported quickly,
    each of the section pillars which provided the supply also had a telephone to the power
    station and the depot

    What happened to London’s trams?
    Articles, Blog

    What happened to London’s trams?

    October 15, 2019


    Ask most people what they know about trams in London, and they’ll say… Erm… I know there’s trams in Croydon. But I think that’s it..? But did you know London used to have the biggest tram network in Europe? So what happened to it? And why is Croydon the only part of London that has trams today? ♫ ♫ ♫ In oldy woldy times, when pretty much every mode of transport involved a horse the best way of getting lots of people to the same place was an omnibus. It was an uncomfortable and bumpy ride. But a clever solution would be brought to London by an eccentric Victorian billionaire from America whose name was George Francis Train. Ha! Really? Mr. Train’s cleverly simple idea was to have omnibuses run on rails running along the street. Mr. Train called them “trams”. Suddenly horses could carry much heavier loads, and go much faster and smoother without giving everyone an orgasm. This also made them affordable. Fares were set at the reasonable price of half a penny. But other road users hated Train’s trams. The rails weren’t recessed into the road, they stuck out good and proper tripping up other vehicles and causing their wheels to break off. But Train continued to build his tramways all over London without ever asking permission first. Until he was stopped in his tracks in 1861 when he was arrested for “Breaking and injuring the Uxbridge Road”. From now on, any entrepreneur wanting to build tramways in… From now on, any entrepreneur wanting to build tramways in London would have to bury their tracks nicely into the road out of harm’s way, and pay for the maintenance of the entire road surface. This meant they now had to solve a rather sticky problem. The average horse produced between 15 and 35 pounds of manure per day. It was famously predicted that if London’s horse traffic continued to increase it would be nine foot deep in horse manure by 1950. The solution eventually came at the end of the nineteenth century with a source that was safe, efficient, cheap, clean and reliable. Electricity. Electricity could be harvested either from cables above the road, or a conduit below. Now that horses were no longer required and the trams were totally turd free the network was able to grow and grow. The London County Council built new connections linking working class suburbs with industrial areas to help get people to work, making it the first truly public transport system in London. They spread particularly far in south and east London to areas which, by no coincidence at all, continue to be poorly served by the Tube. Everywhere in London was getting electric trams. Well, almost everywhere. If you look at this map of the network, you’ll see a vast area close to central London where tram tracks fear to tread. These were the posh parts of town: Kensington and Westminster. Well, that’s understandable I suppose. Westminster had historic streets. And those overhead cables were so ugly. That was the reason they weren’t wanted here, right? Wrong. Many trams used the conduit system with no visible cables. So, if it wasn’t cables, why were they so trams-phobic? Trams, for want of a better expression, were for poor people. Local campaigners complained that trams catered for “an undesirable class of person” and successfully kept the entire central London area unbetrammed. – Thank you, Sir. Because of this, two vast networks north and south of the river remained unconnected. Not because of the Thames, but because of toffs. And it would stay like this until 1906, when a big and very impressive tramfrastructure project was built here. Kingsway in Holborn was built by bulldozing straight down the middle of the slums. The Victorians used to do this sort of thing all the time but Kingsway was special because it came with its very own tram tunnel something never done in London before, or since. This small but truly unique piece of track linking north to south meant that by 1914 London had the biggest tram network in Europe.
    – Yaay! But not for long.
    – Awww. After WWI, money was tight, and tram rails were expensive to maintain. So the tram operators began turning to a newer, cheaper piece of technology – the trolleybus. Trolleybuses were like trams but on pneumatic tyres. They didn’t need rails, which meant they were quieter and more flexible and they could overtake things, like this dick. It was the beginning of the end for the tram. And the middle of the beginning for the trolleybus. But alas, alack, London’s trolleybuses were not long for this world. One person whose fault this was, was Minister for Transport Ernest Marples the man responsible for provisional driving licences, MOTs, traffic wardens, single yellow lines, double yellow lines, Doctor Beeching, and several affairs with prostitutes. Marples wanted people driving more, partly because the car was a symbol for individual freedom but partly because Marples’s family ran a tarmac company. Marples got councils to change their streets to make more room for cars which meant cables had to be torn down. London’s vast network of trams and trolleybuses would need to be replaced by motor buses. Until then, the idea of getting motor buses to take on such a big job was unthinkable. Motor buses were small and heavy and noisy and inefficient. But that would all change…
    * ding ding *
    in 1959. The new Routemaster bus which was super efficient and ran on diesel could carry almost as many people as a trolleybus, but had two massive advantages. 1. Drivers wouldn’t have to worry about the trolley poles coming loose and 2. They could overtake each other. In fact, they could go literally anywhere. With diesel fuel now cheaper than ever, it was a no-brainer. From 1959, Routemasters began replacing tram and trolleybus routes all over London. The network’s capacity was reduced slightly. but since passenger numbers were dwindling anyway, nobody cared. Well, lots of people cared and they were really upset about it. But nobody who mattered cared. It was out with the… *electric motor noise*,
    and in with the… *diesel engine noise* So is there anything left of London’s tram and trolleybus network that you can still see today? Well… There are a few surviving tram sheds, some still with tram tracks in. Eh. There’s a couple of trolley poles still there that are now used as lamp posts. Ooh! There’s a bus route in west London that still uses the number 607, the same as the original trolley… Boring! And this building in Walthamstow has the word “tramway” on it. So the answer is no, not really. Nothing impressive. With one massive exception. This… this… This is what’s left of the Kingsway Tunnel. You can still see very very very clearly where the tram tunnel entrance used to be. Sometimes they open it up for tours, sometimes they use it as an art gallery but at the moment it’s being used to help Crossrail construction. Down at the other end, the entrance has been turned into the door of a night club and the middle half has been turned into the Strand Underpass. And so, the trams and trolleybuses had gone, and London forgot about them. And so did the whole country. Cities up and down the UK were ripping up their tram tracks and pulling down their trolley cables. The only place in the country that kept its tram was Blackpool pleasure beach. Trams, for decades, evoked images of nostalgia and the olden days. – I used to take the tram for a farthing. Even the word “tram” was funny. – …straight in front of a tram. But then, something changed. Traffic congestion was worsening, Demand for public transport was increasing, Pollution became a thing, and trams, suddenly, all of a sudden, had gradually started to suddenly become appealing again. Croydon in south London which had a growing town centre and no Tube was the perfect place for a 21st century experiment. For the first time in 48 years, trams were coming back. These trams would be a fair bit different from the 20th century ones. They were single, not double decker And they were multiple articulated units.
    Which basically means they’re bendy. As well as running on the streets, the new trams would make use of bits of disused or underused railways combining the on-street convenience of buses, with the separate-ness and speed of trains. The Croydon Tramlink, opened in 2000, was an instant hit, attracting 15m passengers in its first year and that number’s kept going up ever since. At around the same time, very similar tram schemes opened in Manchester, Nottingham, Sheffield, Birmingham, and Edinburgh. And don’t get me started on the resurgence of trams in the rest of Europe. So trams are very much back in business for the 21th century. But what about London? Are there plans for any more new tram routes in London? The Cross River Tramway, planned to open in 2016 was meant to run from Camden Town to Peckham/Brixton. The route used Kingsway, but bafflingly had no intention of using the old Kingsway tunnel, instead running on the street above. The scheme had plenty of support, but not enough plenty of money. So it never happened. Then there was the West London Tram planned to run along one of London’s busiest bus corridors from Shepherds Bush to Uxbridge. But two burly men in suits holding a big sign were stood in the way so this never happened either. To be fair, a road like this isn’t suitable for modern trams, and most of London isn’t. To dig up a street this narrow to build the tracks would be prohibiti-tively impractica-cactical. Some campaigners tried to save the West London Tram by suggesting a compromise where they just put the electricity cables up and make it a West London Trolleybus instead. Personally, I think that would have been a brilliant idea. A trolleybus is the best of both worlds: Cheaper and easier to build than a tram but it still replaces noisy polluting buses. In fact, come to think of it, why don’t we do that everywhere? London’s more than 8,000 buses are a huge source of dangerous pollutey air that kills that kills 9,500 people per year. TfL have tried to make them greener, but the best they’ve been able to come up with is a hybrid bus that uses its diesel engine a mere most of the time. The bad news is, the technology for a 100% pollution-free bus that doesn’t need cables at all is not coming any time soon. So I say, let’s get a groove on and hang those cables back up! A modern trolleybus would only need cables on two thirds of its route and those cable wouldn’t need to be so spider webby anymore. There’s no avoiding it, those overhead wires would still be fugly But it’s not just technology that’s moved on, it’s our priorities too. And if 21st century Londoners finally get to breathe clean air then those hideous wires might end up looking quite beautiful. – Hey do you want to hear my new podcast?
    – No. Great! It’s called “Mates Bants” with an 8 and a Z. (very muffled, crackly, barely audible male chatting and laughing) – The audio quality’s really terrible.
    – Oh! I knew I was no good at recording podcasts. I don’t have the knowledge how to do it. I’m rubbish. There there. I have a solution for you. Why don’t you sign up for a monthly subscription to Skillshare? Skillshare is an online learning tool where you can take a course about how to make podcasts sound good or if podcasts aren’t the thing you want to get better at there are courses about music production, or video editing That’s my favourite! or animation. What’s more, if you click the link in the description below the first 500 of you will get Skillshare for free for the first two months. Oh my gosh, thank you! How can I ever repay you? Just under ten dollars per month should do it. That’s how much it costs for an annual subscription to Skillshare. – When I say “skillsh”, you say “air”. Skillsh!
    – Air! – Skillsh! – Air! – Skillsh! – Air! …
    – Air! – Ah, I didn’t say “Skillsh”
    – Ohh!!

    Professional Placement at Metro Trains
    Articles, Blog

    Professional Placement at Metro Trains

    October 15, 2019


    [MUSIC PLAYING] NATHAN LORIENTE: Back in 2009,
    I did my professional placement. Since then, my career has
    grown in leaps and bounds, and now I”m a track production
    manager at Metro Trains Melbourne. So I’m in charge and
    inspecting, planning all these amazing tasks. And to be able to do
    that at such a young age, it’s because I was able
    to do this program. I was able to learn specific
    things about the railway industry, which
    you would never get taught in university or school. My experience being a previous
    professional placement student was amazing. It was great to
    have the opportunity to take a year off uni
    and work full time. It taught me a lot
    about the real world. It taught me a lot
    about business. We decided to take a student
    on a professional placement, because some of
    the best engineers have come from this
    Swinburne program. FERGUS: I’m a
    student at Swinburne, and I’m studying civil
    engineering and finance. And I’m working at
    Metro Trains Melbourne. The reason I decided to do
    a professional placement was because I was curious
    to see what opportunities Swinburne could provide me. I’m very lucky. I love it here at Metro. I thought it would be the
    job for me, so I applied. Always been interested
    in mechanical systems, alongside civil
    engineering as a whole. From a very young age, I was
    quite obsessed with trains. It was a big, big
    passion of mine. NATHAN LORIENTE: Fergus has
    brought several new ideas to the team. It’s great to have a
    fresh set of eyes come in, especially someone who’s
    so motivated and ambitious in his career. FERGUS: I’m proud
    of a lot of things that I’ve done here
    at Metro Train so far. I like the opportunities
    to go out on site, to really understand
    technical aspects of rail that I never would have
    understood otherwise, and just the fact
    that I’m exposed to new things every day. NATHAN LORIENTE: I’m really
    passionate about developing engineers in the
    railway industry. This professional
    placements program is providing the railways
    with a succession plan. FERGUS: The things that you
    learn here, you’ll extend yourself so much further. You’ve got nothing to lose.

    Rancho Cordova teen killed by light-rail train
    Articles, Blog

    Rancho Cordova teen killed by light-rail train

    October 14, 2019


    SIDELINING A FAMILY BUSINESS. HUNDREDS OF FRIENDS, FAMILY AND CLASSMATES GATHER IN RANCHO CORDOVA FOR A CANDLELIGHT VIGIL AT THE SPOT NEAR FOLSOM BOULEVARD AND COLOMA ROAD WHERE A TEENAGE GIRL WAS HIT AND KILLED BY A LIGHT RAIL TRAIN JUST HOURS EARLIER. I DON’T WANT TO SEE THIS HAPPEN AGAIN. GOOD EVENING I’M ROB MALCOLM. AND I’M EDIE LAMBERT IN FOR KELLIE DEMARCO. REGIONAL TRANSIT OFFICIALS NOW SAY THE GIRL WAS WEARING HEADPHONES AS SHE CROSSED THE TRACKS AND MAY HAVE BEEN DISTRACTED. KCRA-3’S BRIAN HEAP IS LIVE IN RANCHO CORDOVA TONIGHT WITH THE LATEST. HOLDING CANDLES AND HOLDING ONE ANOTHER. THOSE WHO KNEW HER AND EVEN SOME WHO DIDN’T SHOWED UP TO PAY THEIR RESPECTS. I THINK WE’RE ALL HEART BROKE THAN SOMETHING LIKE THIS COULD HAPPEN. I WISH IT COULD HAVE BEEN PREVENTED BECAUSE SHE WAS SUCH A SWEET YOUNG GIRL. WE’RE IN MOURNING RIGHT NOW. IT’S VERY SAD. HER MOTHER WAS THERE AND THANKED PEOPLE FOR COMING. JUST A FEW HOURS EARLIER HER DAUGHTER WAS AT SCHOOL AND NOW SHE’S GONE. AS THURSDAY NIGHT’S CROWD GREW LARGER, POLICE WERE NEEDED TO KEEP CONTROL. SO MANY WERE THERE THEY FORCED A TRAIN TO STOP COMPLETELY. A SHERIFF’S HELICOPTER ORDERED THE CROWD OFF THE TRACKS. SLOWLY POLICE WERE ABLE TO MOVE THEM TO A SAFER PLACE BUT THEIR MESSAGE WAS CLEAR. MAYBE THEY ARE JUST BEING RESPECTFUL BECAUSE THEY LIVE HERE AND THEY WANT TO SEE CHANGE. THERE SHOULD BE A CROSSING GUARD OVER HERE HELPING PEOPLE CROSS. I HAVE A LITTLE ONE COMING UP. I HAVE TO TEACH HER DIFFERENTLY. IT’S NOT OK TO WALK AROUND WITH YOUR HEAD PHONES AND THINK THE REST OF THE WORLD WILL STOP FOR YOU. IT’S SOMETHING WE HAVE TO LEARN WITH THE CHANGING OF THE TIMES. YOU ARE LOOK AT MORE OF THE CANDLES HERE IN TRIBUTE TO THE GIRL WHOSE FAMILY MEMBERS IDENTIFIED AS MARIAH. THERE ARE RED FLASHING LIGHTS AND BELLS THAT SOUND AS THE TRAIN COMES THROUGH. THERE ARE SIGNS POSTED WARNING

    Poole and District Electric Tramways | Wikipedia audio article
    Articles, Blog

    Poole and District Electric Tramways | Wikipedia audio article

    October 14, 2019


    The Poole and District Electric Tramways operated
    an electric tramway service in Poole between 1901 and 1905.==History==
    The Poole and District Electric Traction Company was a subsidiary of British Electric Traction. A single line was built from Poole railway
    station through Upper Parkstone to County Gates. The fare for the journey was 3d. The company operated a fleet of 17 tramcars
    from a depot at Ashley Road in Upper Parkstone.==Closure==
    The system was bought by Poole Corporation in 1905 and leased for thirty years to Bournemouth
    Corporation Tramways from June 1905, and this line was subsumed into their system