Browsing Tag: was

    Young Designers Light Rail Ideas Competition:Category A winners
    Articles, Blog

    Young Designers Light Rail Ideas Competition:Category A winners

    October 19, 2019


    How did you get to the idea of your eventual
    station design? Ah well we…before the day, or the two days
    of the thing, we went to the O’Connor Ridge and we just got some bark and leaves and stuff.
    Yeah because Canberra is the bush capital, we thought we wanted to inspire ourselves
    using the bush. So, yeah we went into O’Connor Ridge and found examples of bark and leaves.
    And being able to work as a part of a big group and also amongst a whole bunch of other
    groups over the last two days, was that a fun process?
    Yeah Yeah it was really cool, seeing all the groups
    collaborate together was really great!

    Sydney Metro: Cherrybrook Station community day
    Articles, Blog

    Sydney Metro: Cherrybrook Station community day

    October 19, 2019


    Welcome ! Welcome ! Welcome to Cherrybrook ! [Train horn] [Crowd cheering] [Woohoo!] I was enormously proud when that first train pulled in and you got the reaction. Huge roar. Completely unprompted. Was great. Then you got two trains. How good is that? And everyone then realised – this is real, it’s happening, and it’s coming soon. [Crowd cheering] [Clapping] Everyone was clapping and there was a whole lot of cheers. It was really exciting. It was the first look at the new Sydney metro train for the public. I must admit I clapped and I was pleased to see a few other people clapped too. I asked a lady down there what she thought and if its possible to be nearly in tears on a railway station – she was. She just raved about them. It was fantastic. I mean just seeing them in action. I mean obviously we know that it’s coming but seeing them moving. It’s very exciting, they’re really close. I feel terrific [Laughter]. Other than peering through the fence out at Tallawong these are the first two I’ve seen in action. It’s been fantastic. People I was talking to on the platform, they can’t wait for it to come, they cant wait for it to open. Fabulous. Absolutely very excited to be poart of the whole thing. We do live close by so it will be very convenient for us. Catch the train and go to city. It is very attractive. No-one can think it’s a Metro station from outside but when you get in I think it’s comfort. We all have been waiting for it. My husband goes to the city so this is a great idea changing at Chatswood and going to city. The kids can go to Uni. It’s a very flexible thing. It opens up employment opportunities it opens up opportunities for schooling and education. Really excited about the shops as well. You dont have to fight the traffic into Macquarie or even Castle Towers. Really excited about al those sort of options. I think the people of Cherrybrook have been waiting for this a long time so really exciting to happen. Absolutely.
    [Music]
    [END]

    Vintage Disneyland; What Happened to the People Mover?
    Articles, Blog

    Vintage Disneyland; What Happened to the People Mover?

    October 18, 2019


    Hey guys! Fastpass Facts here bringing you our second
    Vintage Disneyland video! This time we’ll be talking about one of
    our favorite “D” ticket attractions: the PeopleMover! So, we all know how Walt always wanted to
    innovate and one of the best lands where he could develop this new innovative ideas was
    Tomorrowland and so in 1967 Disneyland introduced the Peoplemover. This D ticket attraction gave guests a scenic
    16 minute tour around all Tomorrowland starting at Tomorrowland’s entrance, going into the
    Adventure Thru Inner Space building, past the shoppers in the Character Shop, then going
    in and out of the Carousel Theater, near the submarine lagoon, through the waiting area
    of the Circarama theater, and, as of the late ‘70s inside of Space Mountain! Now, unlike the monorail and other trains
    in the park, the little blue, red, green, and yellow cars in the PeopleMover weren’t
    motorized themselves, what made them move was their motorized tracks! The rubber tires mounted along the track were
    powered by electricity to push the PeopleMover along at a speed of 7 miles per hour. Walt hoped that this transportation method
    would be used by cities in the future for urban transit and it proved to be really effective,
    the little cars could fit 4 people comfortably and almost 4,900 passengers could be moved
    through the attraction per hour! The system was actually studied by many city
    planners but it was never used. So, what happened to the beloved PeopleMover? Well, Tomorrowland and all of its attractions
    started to feel a little outdated and Imagineers knew that they needed to renovate the land. So, in 1995 they started drawing inspiration
    from Discoveryland, the Tomorrowland type land at Disneyland Paris, or EuroDisney as
    it was called back then. They came up with the idea of Tomorrowland
    2055 and they started working on this renovation. But sadly, EuroDisney was not initially well-received
    and caused a major financial strain for the other Disney parks, so the budget for Tomorrowland
    2055 was largely cut. When Tomorrowland opened again in 1998 there
    were only a few changes made to the land and one of them was the PeopleMover. The attraction turned into Rocket Rods, a
    ride that broke down constantly and disappointed many of the guests. So in 2000 Disneyland decide to close this
    ride and the unused tracks still stand gracefully across Tomorrowland since then. We would be so happy if the PeopleMover came
    back! Wouldn’t you? That’s it for today! But don’t forget to subscribe, comment or
    share if you like our videos! See you next time!!

    Armenia – a Unique Land – Ambassador Heffern’s Video Blog – Episode 4
    Articles, Blog

    Armenia – a Unique Land – Ambassador Heffern’s Video Blog – Episode 4

    October 17, 2019


    [MUSIC PLAYING] AMBASSADOR JOHN
    HEFFERN: [ARMENIAN].. Armenia is unique with its many
    incredible historic, cultural, and religious landmarks that
    bring international visitors here. Recently, my wife, Libby, and
    I visited the town of Jermuk. We loved the mountains there,
    the spas, and the hot springs. MS. LIBBY HEFFERN: I was able
    to have a hydro massage, which was great fun. And I’m hoping that
    next time, I’ll be able to have a whole
    variety of treatments. AMBASSADOR HEFFERN: We also
    saw how the natural water there is creating jobs
    for the local people at the Jermuk water
    bottling plant. On the way to Jermuk, we
    visited the magnificent Noravank church. This church is exactly the
    kind of historic, cultural, and religious landmark that brings
    foreign visitors to Armenia. In Areni, on the way, we bought
    some fine Areni red wine. We also visited the cave there,
    where archeologists discovered Armenia’s famous
    5,000-year old shoe. There are not many
    countries in the world that can claim an archeological
    find such as this. And finally– and it was
    a special treat for me– we stopped for coffee at a cafe. It was a roadside
    cafe in a cave. And the owner of
    this cafe, Vardges, is a serious birdwatcher. And Varges and I– which also
    is one of my favorite hobbies. So Vardges and I are
    planning some trips during next spring’s bird
    migration season in Armenia to do some birdwatching
    around the country. Armenia’s unique wetlands
    and natural parks offer an environmental
    attraction as well for
    international tourists. So thank you very much. [ARMENIAN]

    A Train Almost Ruined the Town But Something Saved People
    Articles, Blog

    A Train Almost Ruined the Town But Something Saved People

    October 17, 2019


    Imagine: You’re on a train, calm, relaxed,
    and enjoying your journey without a care in the world. After all, traveling by train is one of the
    safest ways to get somewhere. But what’s that? You feel it accelerate, and soon it’s already
    moving at breakneck speed, ignoring stop signs, stations, and other trains. You’re pinching yourself in a futile attempt
    to wake up, but it’s no nightmare – you’re on a runaway train! Wait, that really happens? Sure does, and there are plenty of real cases,
    like that of train #1908. It was a cold winter night on January 11,
    2004 when the 5,000-ton freight train was moving along the main Volkhovstroy 2 line
    in Russia’s northwestern Leningrad region, where Saint Petersburg is located. Even though everything seemed to be in order
    at that moment, just a couple of hours before, it looked as if the train wouldn’t be able
    to start its journey at all. (Perhaps that would’ve been for the better
    given how things would turn out later…) The thing is that two people were supposed
    to arrive at the train yard that night: 31-year-old engineer Eduard and his 24-year-old assistant
    Alexander. But when it was time for their shift to begin
    at 11pm, the engineer was nowhere to be seen. After waiting for his co-worker for 15 minutes,
    the assistant decided to inform management. They eventually got hold of Eduard, and the
    engineer simply said that he’d overslept. He ended up arriving on site at 12:15am, making
    him 1 hour and 15 minutes late. Obviously, everybody was severely behind schedule
    now, so the engineer’s standard pre-journey medical check was done in a hurry. But his health readings were normal, and he
    was totally sober. Everything was fine, nothing out of routine
    here, except maybe the fact that instead of his uniform, the man was wearing a suit and
    tie, as if he was going to some important event. But nobody seemed to find that odd… And why would they? After all, the engine driver, although quite
    private, was a disciplined worker. He was just your normal guy, liked football
    and hockey. Perhaps he just had a wedding or something
    to go to after work, and he wouldn’t have time to change. Who knows? In any case, after the doctors gave him the
    green light, the engineer was ready to go. He climbed up into the cab, and that’s when
    his assistant noticed another oddity. Eduard didn’t put a new tape into the train’s
    speedometer, which was a serious violation of the rules. But when asked, Eduard assured his partner
    that everything was ok and started the locomotive. It left the train yard at 12:42am and headed
    for its first station, where it got connected to 58 loaded cars. After the train left the loading station,
    the engineer broke protocol once more by refusing to check if the brake system was working correctly. Again, they were critically behind schedule,
    so nothing seemed too alarming at first. But then… As the train came toward the railway haul
    Volkhovstroy 2 – Kukol’, the station operator reported that there was another train approaching
    the station. Train #1908 was supposed to make way for the
    other locomotive and wait for it to pass. Alexander the assistant confirmed receiving
    this information, and the train started to slow down. But within seconds, the younger man screamed
    in horror when the engineer hit the controls to accelerate! When Alexander tried to bring his co-worker
    to his senses, the much stronger engineer answered back with physical threats. Desperate, the assistant realized that there
    was nothing he could do to prevent what was sure to become one of the most terrible railway
    disasters in history. By that time, the engineer had already switched
    off the cab signaling, which was supposed to inform him about the maximum speed allowed
    on the track. At 2:58am, the train blew through the red
    light at Kukol’ station, careened on a totally unscheduled route, and dashed toward the main
    track. No one could contact the two men inside – the
    train’s radio receiver had been switched off. It was gaining speed, now reaching 60 mph
    (100 kph). Horror-stricken Alexander couldn’t do a thing
    to stop his partner. Eduard, obviously, had lost his mind. Everything changed at Valya station. At 3:02am, when the runaway had already blown
    through the previous stop at Myslino, the Valya station operator came up with the idea
    to cut the power on the line. It was done just seconds before the multi-ton
    train sped past his station. Even though the electricity had been successfully
    cut off, the train kept gaining speed because it was going downhill. Luckily, this descent turned into a steep
    incline about 5 miles (8 km) down the way, and the train’s speed started to drop. At 3:45am, the train finally lost its forward
    momentum and came to a stop. Alexander the assistant immediately saw his
    only chance to escape. He jumped out of the cab and rushed toward
    the nearest station to report the incident. Good thing he got out when he could because
    the train then started to roll back toward Valya station! Remember, it was now on a pretty steep hill. Naturally, the engineer didn’t apply the brakes,
    so the train rolled another 1 mile (1.6 km) in the opposite direction before it came to
    a halt, this time for good. When the police got to the train at 4:14am,
    they discovered the engineer on the floor, completely out of it. The delusional man was taken to the hospital
    for mental health treatment. It was a shocking diagnosis, given that he’d
    passed his previous mandatory psych evaluation in 2003. Well, in any case, thanks to some fast thinking
    on that station operator’s part, this incident didn’t turn into a catastrophe. Had the train continued its crazed path to
    destruction, it would’ve made it to the town of Tikhvin, population: 60,000. Phew! What a story! But I’ve got another one for you, and this
    runaway train might sound a little more familiar. Ever heard of the “Crazy Eights” incident? It happened on May 15, 2001 in northwest Ohio. Locomotive #8888 (hence the nickname) was
    moving a string of 47 freight cars on the Walbridge – Kenton line. Twenty-two of the cars were full, with two
    of them containing thousands of gallons of an extremely hazardous and combustible industrial
    chemical: molten phenol. If a person inhales or digests this stuff,
    or if it comes into contact with the skin, the consequences won’t be pretty. Things were going smoothly until the train’s
    35-year-old engineer noticed that one switch was strangely misaligned. The man decided that since the train was moving
    quite slowly, he’d have more than enough time to get down, fix the switch, and climb
    right back up into his cabin. But as it turned out later, that wasn’t a
    great plan whatsoever. Before the engineer left the cab, he’d set
    the wrong brake. In other words, he didn’t hit the one that
    would keep all the cars locked in place. But that wasn’t the only problem. When the man had applied the brakes, he automatically
    disabled the dead man’s switch. This switch can cut the engine power and stop
    the train if something were to happen to the operator. But these circumstances wouldn’t have led
    to such a huge ordeal if it hadn’t been for the last, dire mistake. When the engineer tried to switch a special
    brake that would’ve slowed the train down to a crawl, he accidentally set the engine
    not to brake but to accelerate! So, here’s the situation: you’ve got a
    super heavy freight train with hazardous chemicals, one functioning brake that’s certainly not
    powerful enough to stop the whole train, and the only human operator is about to disembark. Hmm, let’s see what happens, shall we? When the engineer got to the ground and aligned
    the switch, he immediately tried to get back on board. But the locomotive was already speeding up. The train dragged the man for about 80 feet
    (25 m) before dumping him on the ground and rolling out of the yard to start its 65-mile
    (105 km) journey. On the one hand, the engineer was luckily
    mostly unscathed. On the other hand, a stray train was running
    south at a speed of 51 miles per hour (82 kph) with no one at the controls! You can imagine the turmoil that started as
    soon as the authorities found out about the runaway. At first, they tried to stop the train with
    the help of a portable derailer, but these attempts failed. Then the police started to shoot at the emergency
    switch, which serves to cut off the fuel supply. That didn’t work either because the switch
    had to be pressed for at least a few seconds before the fuel-starved engine would shut
    down. It was then when dispatchers came up with
    a brilliant idea. Locomotive #8391 would wait in ambush for
    the runaway #8888 to approach. There were two crewmembers on that train:
    engineers Jess Knowlton and Terry Forson. When the two of them saw the speeding runaway,
    the chase ensued. Luckily, Knowlton and Forson managed to couple
    onto the freight train’s rear car and began to slow it down. As soon as the runaway’s speed dropped to
    11 mph (18 kph), engineer Jon Hosfeld, who’d been waiting up ahead, managed to climb into
    the cab and shut down the engine. Later, it turned out that the heat and friction
    had completely destroyed the brakes on #8888 after they’d been in use during the whole
    trip. Even though this incident gave everyone involved
    and the public quite a scare, it did end well. And, boy, talk about teamwork makes the dream
    work! Have you ever heard about any other runaway
    trains? Let me know down in the comments! If you learned something new today, then give
    this video a like and share it with a friend. But hey now, don’t start uncoupling from us
    just yet! We have over 2,000 cool videos for you to
    check out. All you have to do is pick the left or right
    video, click on it, and enjoy! Stay on the Bright Side of life!

    State finds problems with stuck monorail incident at Cal Expo
    Articles, Blog

    State finds problems with stuck monorail incident at Cal Expo

    October 17, 2019


    IN A KCRA3 INVESTIGATION WE HAVE OBTAINED NEW VK — DETAILS ABOUT WHAT CAUSED THE VEHICLE TO BECOME STRANDED. THE MONORAIL WAS STUCK IN JULY OF 2013. PEOPLE WERE NERVOUS ABOUT THAT. KCRA 3 REPORTS THAT THEY FOUND A LACK OF TRAINING AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2013 THE STATE FAIR WAS IN FULL WING WHEN THE MONORAIL CAME TO A HALT. EVERYONE WAS LEANING TO THE SIDE. THREE DOZEN PASSENGERS HAD TO BE PLUCKED FROM THE CARS WHEN ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS SHUT DOWN THE POWER. SCARY HOW FAR DOWN IT WAS. IT BLAMED THE SHUTDOWN ON A DANGLING WIRE. OSHA INVESTIGATORS FOUND THAT AT THE TIME OF THE INCIDENT EMPLOYEES DID NOT HAVE SUFFICIENT UNDERSTANDING OF THE EQUIPMENT AND THE BACKUP POWER SUPPLY. IT FORCED PATRONS TO ACROSS THE OPEN WINDOWS TO GET OUT TO RESCUERS. IT SLOWED DOWN THE EVACUATION. THE REPORT POINTS OUT THAT NO ONE WAS HURT AND WRITERS WERE RESCUED WITHIN ONE HOUR. SINCE NOTIFICATION, THE RIGHT HAS BEEN OPERATING FOR MORE THAN A YEAR. CAL

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    Prague, Czech Republic Walking Tour – Old Town (4k Ultra HD 60fps)

    October 17, 2019


    In the middle of the square is a Neo-Gothic statue of Charles IV leaning against a sword and holding the deed of foundation of Charles University in Prague. The statue was made in 1848 on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of Charles University. Church of St Francis was built by the Knights of the Cross with the Red Star in the 17th century. The architecture of this Baroque church with an impressive dome has served as an exemplar for many future architects. Another dominant of the square is the Church of the Holy Saviour which belongs to the large Clementinum complex. The Old Town Bridge Tower is one of the most beautiful Gothic gateways in the world. The tower, along with Charles Bridge, was built by Emperor Charles IV according to designs by Petr Parléř in the mid-14 th century. Prague is the capital and largest city in the Czech Republic and the historical capital of Bohemia. Is also home to a number of well-known cultural attractions, many of which survived the violence and destruction of 20th-century Europe. Since 1992, the extensive historic centre of Prague has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. The large New City Hall, with its beautiful facade, sits in the middle of Virgin Mary Square which has deep roots back to Medieval times. Today’s New City Hall was built from 1908-1911 in a classic Art Nouveau-style decorated by dozens of statues. Here you will catch your first glimpse of Prague’s tightly packed colorful buildings. The picture-perfect scene in Little Square is a great preview what you will see later on this Old Town Prague walking tour. Little Square is said to be the oldest inhabited part of Prague with homes going back to the 700s. This building, part of the Old Town Hall complex, is a typical example of Czech Renaissance townhouse architecture. The facade, decorated with sgraffito, depicts scenes drawn from biblical and mythological sources, as well as contemporary Renaissance legends. Franz Kafka and his parents lived here from 1889 to 1896. The astronomical clock was placed at the front side of the tower in 1410. At the southern part of the tower a special stone chamber was built for its mechanical part. The astronomical clock consists of different parts – such as a calendar and an astronomical desk or the mechanism of twelve apostles which sets them in motion. On 21 June 1621, 27 Czech Protestants were executed for their role in the Bohemian Revolt, and as a warning to others. The revolt was predominantly driven by religious differences, although there was discontent over power disparities, as well. It is the most famous Baroque church in Prague and is also one of the most valuable Baroque buildings north of the Alps. The dome has an impressive diameter of 20 m, and the interior height to the top of the lantern is over 49 m, making it the highest interior in Prague. It is also an outstanding example of high Baroque decoration. Concerts are held in the church year-round on the historic organ dating to the 18th century. The large monument in the middle of the Old Town Square in Prague is the statue of the reformer Jan Hus, one of the most important personalities in Czech history. A hundred years before the Protestant Reformation was started by Martin Luther, Jan Hus was burnt as a heretic for reformist ideas. This Rococo building on Old Town Square features rich stucco and sculptural decoration. The Kinský Palace has been witness to many historical events. Today it is the seat of the National Gallery in Prague. One of the most impressive Gothic religious buildings in Prague, Church of Our Lady before Týn was built from the mid-14th to the early 16th centuries. The two dominating towers are 262 feet high (80 meters). One tower, Adam, is larger than the other, Eve, a classic Gothic architecture play on feminine and masculine parts of life. At the end of the 17th century, the interior was reworked in Baroque style. The cathedral serves as an extensive gallery of Gothic, Renaissance and Early Baroque works. The most interesting of which include altar paintings by Karel Škréta and the tomb of the astronomer Tycho Brahe. The organ, dating from 1673, is the oldest in Prague. From the 1000’s through the Middle Ages the hidden Ungelt Courtyard (or Merchant Yard) was the main square for foreign merchants coming to sell goods in Prague. This massive three-aisled basilica with a long, high chancel is the third longest church building in Prague. The church was founded in 1232, and was rebuilt in Baroque style in the 18th century. One of the oldest streets in Prague, Celetna Lane, connects the Old Town Square with the Republic Square. It is lined with picturesque houses, adorned with house symbols. This monumental entrance by which the coronation processions of Czech kings entered the Old Town is one of the most significant monuments of Late Gothic Prague. Completed in 1475, the Powder Tower, which formerly served as a gunpowder store, is still the starting point for the Coronation or Royal Route to Prague Castle. The high point of any shopping trip in the city should be Na Příkopě Street, one of its main commercial streets. This hub of retail delights is right in the center of Prague, connecting Wenceslas Square with the Powder Tower. Spanning the entrance to Nekázanka Street are a twin set of beautiful enclosed bridges which resemble the Bridge of Sighs in Venice Italy. The Estates Theatre in Prague is one of the most beautiful historical theatres in Europe and was opened in 1783. The premiere of Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni was given here on October 29, 1787. Havel’s Market is one of the city’s oldest markets dating back to 1232. Over the years, the market has shifted its focus from food products to selling souvenirs, keeping in mind the influx of tourists. Connecting Old Town Square with the Jewish Quarter, Paris Street has high-end shopping that rivals the Champs-Élysées in Paris and 5th Avenue in New York City. This narrow lane is the main artery of Prague’s Jewish Quarter and today is lined with stands selling souvenirs. The surprising Neo-Romanquese Ceremonial Hall (built from 1908-19011) was established by the Burial Society as the Cemetery’s mortuary to prepare the dead for burial. This statue depicts Franz Kafka riding on the shoulders of a headless figure, in reference to the author’s 1912 story “Description of a Struggle”. The Church of the Holy Spirit, built in mid-14th century, is located on the very border of Old Town and former Jewish Quarter. During the reign of Ferdinand I in mid-16th century, Jews had to attend catholic masses served here. The stunning Spanish Synagogue was built in 1868 over the site of the Old School (Alt Schul) Synagogue. Before it was torn down in 1867, the Old Schul had been the oldest synagogue standing in the Prague and marked the true beginning of the Jewish Quarter. The exhibitions held here are focused primarily on local Jewish artists from the late 19th and early 20th century.

    Pedestrian struck, killed by Sacramento light rail train
    Articles, Blog

    Pedestrian struck, killed by Sacramento light rail train

    October 16, 2019


    KRISTEN SIMOES JUST SPOKE TO INVESTIGATORS AND JOINS US LIVE WITH WHAT THEY ARE SAYING. KRISTEN: GOOD MORNING. INVESTIGATORS JUST CLEARED THE SCENE. THEY HAVE RAISED THE CROSSING GUARDS, TRAFFIC IS BACK TO NORMAL HERE. WE ARE ON 26TH AVENUE. THE FRUITRIDGE LIGHT RAIL STATION WAS AFFECTED. IT HAPPENED THIS MORNING WHEN A MAN WAS WALKING ALONG THE TRACKS. IT WAS STILL DARK. BY THE TIME THE TRAIN OPERATOR WAS ABLE TO SEE THE MAN, IT WAS TOO LATE. IT AFFECTED SERVICE ALONG THE BLUE LINE FOR ABOUT AN HOUR AND A HALF. WE TALKED WITH HER MENTAL POLICE — WE TALKED WITH SACRAMENTO POLICE.>>WE HAD SOME TRAINS THAT WERE GOING BACKWARDS. WE WERE ABLE TO GET PEOPLE TO AND FROM — WHENEVER A SIGNIFICANT AFFECT — EVENT LIKE THIS OCCURS, IT DOES DISRUPT OUR SERVICE. KRISTEN: THEY DID HAVE A BUS BRIDGE SET UP AT 4TH AVENUE.

    Driver training on the elevated rail at Noble Park
    Articles, Blog

    Driver training on the elevated rail at Noble Park

    October 16, 2019


    I was very fortunate this morning to be the first driver to go over the viaduct at Noble Park. The new track that’s down now it’s on
    rubber mats, it’s unbelievable. It was just so smooth and quiet. A lot of work has gone in to get it to that
    quality. From a driver’s perspective it was quite enjoyable to drive. You could see the difference between the new
    and the old. A lot of design work has gone into the signalling. I was part of that and I was very fortunate
    to watch it progress from a design phase to signals on the ground. The signals have been placed for the drivers. A lot of human factors have been involved. Drivers have had input in the design as well. And the comments from the drivers today have been fantastic. The projects have been really good too. They’ve been able to facilitate what we need
    and understand our requirements. So yeah, it’s positive all the way around. One of the key benefits is the separation
    from road traffic and pedestrians from the railway section. Not having to worry about boom gates. One of the comments from one of the trainers
    was that they noticed the difference from being on an elevated section. There are no obstructions, nothing to take
    your eye off what you need to focus on which are the signals. And it’s cleaner. There are no buildings.
    There’s no trees in the way. It’s such an improvement. It was a joy to actually drive. Now that the level crossings have gone, we’ve
    got a nice smooth track for our trains, so the reliability is going to improve. The drivability is going to improve with better
    signalling, better visibility, you know, better infrastructure, better for drivers and better
    for the public.

    Witnesses Describe Minneapolis Fatal Light Rail Accident
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    Witnesses Describe Minneapolis Fatal Light Rail Accident

    October 16, 2019


    PLAYER. HE IS WOULD MAKE A COURT APPEARANCE ON WEDNESDAY. WITNESSES SAY THAT MAN IN A WHEELCHAIR WAS USING THE CROSSWALK NEAR 20 FOR AVENUE SOUTH. THE WITNESS SAYS THE MAN APPEARED TO BE IN HIS GOOD DAYS AND TRAVELING WITH THE CARETAKER AND A GROUP OF A FEW OTHER PEOPLE. HE SAID IT MANY PEOPLE TRY TO RUSH TO HELP THE STATE AT ALL HAPPENED SO FAST. WE SAW THEM MOVING UP FROM THE WHEELCHAIR. AT THE SAME TOKEN THE TRAIN WAS BURIED AND DOWN. NOT MUCH TIME. THE VICTIM WASN’T TRYING TO BEAT THE TRADE THE CROSSING ARM CAME DOWN JUST AFTER THE MAN FELL ONTO THE TRACKS. THE CUT THE CORNER. A TURTLE ACCIDENT. THEY IMPACT HOW HARD IT WAS. WE WANT TO TURN IT INTO THAT. PROMPTING THE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION OPERATOR TO LOOK INTO STRENGTHENING SAFETY AND SIGNAGE. HE MIGHT NOT HAVE RECOGNIZED THE DANGER HE WAS IN. SOME SNOW AND ICE COVERED THE SIDEWALK. AS FAR AS THE SIDEWALKS THEMSELVES I CAN’T REALLY SPEAK TO THAT. THAT SOMETHING WELL HAD TO FIGURE OUT A PLAN TO REVIEW THE LATE RAIL SYSTEM. THIS VICTIM’S NAME HAS NOT YET