Browsing Tag: Train

    Josiah Henson and the Underground Railroad in Ontario | Le chemin de fer clandestin en Ontario
    Articles, Blog

    Josiah Henson and the Underground Railroad in Ontario | Le chemin de fer clandestin en Ontario

    August 17, 2019


    We’re in Southwestern Ontario in a little town called Dresden at the Josiah Henson Interpretative Centre of the Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site. I think one of the most remarkable things about Josiah Henson’s story is he was a black man who was only considered as property. But here, this man went across the world. He went to England. He met the Queen. He met the President of the United States because he had worked himself up to a position where he was a leader within the black community and the work that he did here in Dresden at the Dawn Settlement really helped put Canada on the map as a safe haven for refugees escaping from slavery in the United States. I was born and raised in Dresden, Ontario and still live here and raised my family here. Like Josiah Henson and his family, my ancestors also came by way of the Underground Railroad. I think Black History month is very important for these children to learn about their heritage and let them know that they need to be proud of their heritage. There is a place for the past, but we need to lead them into the future. I think the students that come here from the city are really surprised that this is in its – kind of in its rawest form how we came here to Canada, ’cause we need to study our past in order to understand our present and build a better future for ourselves.

    Train at Pedestrian Railroad Crossing
    Articles, Blog

    Train at Pedestrian Railroad Crossing

    August 17, 2019


    Hello ladies and gentlemen, I’m here in Fort lauderdale FL and that sound you’re hearing is an FEC freight train that is about to come thru this railroad crossing thats the FT lauderdale bridge there’s a drawbridge right, about 100 feet south of me right there is the drawbridge I already hear the crossing at Broward Blvd coming down this here is a pedestrian crossing so we’ll stay and see the train

    Talking Train Sign | Railroad Crossings Gates  | Train Safety | Lots & Lots of Trains
    Articles, Blog

    Talking Train Sign | Railroad Crossings Gates | Train Safety | Lots & Lots of Trains

    August 17, 2019


    Hello! Trains are cool and fun to watch, but you have to be careful whenever you and your family are around trains and train tracks. Safety is important. You know, every 3 hours, a person or vehicle is hit by a train. So, when you see tracks, think train. There are all kinds of signs and signals to let you know when and where there are trains around. Want to see them? Okay. Just look at me. When you see a round yellow sign with a big black X on it, that means the road you’re on has train tracks up ahead. It means you should slow down and look and listen for any trains that might be coming. There are also big markings painting on the road that also warn of train tracks ahead, and where cars should stop safely. At the railroad tracks, there’s a cross-buck, a big white X with the words, “Railroad Crossing” on it. Just like me, the yellow warning sign, it means to look and listen for a train before crossing the tracks. There might also be a sign below it showing how many sets of tracks are at the crossing. Nearby, there should also be a rectangular blue sign with a phone number on it. If your car should get stuck on the tracks, get out immediately and call this number. This is the first number you should call, but if this sign isn’t around, call 911. Many railroad crossings have lights and a bell along with the cross-buck. When a train is coming, the red lights flash, the bell rings, and if there are gates, they come down across the road. It is illegal to drive around lowered gates, not to mention very, very dangerous. Some roads with a lot of traffic have an additional set of flashing lights mounted up high on what’s called a cantilever. This let’s everyone- cars, busses, and trucks- to see when there’s a train coming. Safety is important even if you’re walking, or riding your bike or skateboard. Never walk on or along railroad tracks. It can take a train more than a mile to stop when it’s running. So, if you can’t get off the tracks for any reason, you could be in big trouble. Anyway, railroad tracks, railyards, and trains are private property and you’re not supposed to be on them anyway. Never dash across the tracks as soon as a train passes. There could be another one coming from the other direction, and you’d never see them until it was too late. Wait until the gates go up and the lights are off before crossing the tracks. Trains are fun to watch, and they carry people, and all sorts of goods, all over the country. But, being too close to them can be dangerous. So, when you see tracks, think train. Captions by
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    Railroad Trespassing – Find a Different Way: Cody Paugel’s Story
    Articles, Blog

    Railroad Trespassing – Find a Different Way: Cody Paugel’s Story

    August 15, 2019


    It was October 12th, 2012. I was 16 years old. I was walking on the tracks. I had headphones in, music blaring, walking
    the same way I do every single day. I heard a noise in the background and I turned
    around and I saw the Amtrak train right behind me. All I could think of doing at that point was
    just jump, try to get away from it, and unfortunately it still got me. I remember seeing my shoe fly off and then
    hitting the ground. You know when I got to the hospital I was
    in pretty rough shape. The initial impact broke my pelvis, my hip,
    four cracked ribs. I remember waking up, my leg was in traction. All in all, I had 31 surgeries, a lot of physical
    therapy. I had to relearn how to walk, how to use the
    bathroom, but I did survive. I was lucky. It doesn’t always happen that way. All in all, I just wasn’t thinking about what
    I was doing. Don’t go on the train tracks. Don’t take that shortcut. There’s different ways to get to where you
    need to go.

    A Bridge Between the USA and Russia
    Articles, Blog

    A Bridge Between the USA and Russia

    August 15, 2019


    The relationship between the USA and Russia is complicated. JFK: “It shall be the policy of this nation to regard any nuclear missile, launched from Cuba against any nation in the Western Hemisphere as an attack by the Soviet Union on the United States.” *Intense laughter* JFK: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade, and do the other things. Not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” Their rivalry defined the second half of the 20th century. Reagan: “Mr. Gorbachev tear down this wall.” Millions are spent each year trying to improve relations, and even more spent undermining them again. To many their opposites; chalk and cheese, vodka and apple pie, Oceania vs Eurasia, East vs West. It’s easy to forget that only 51 miles separates them. If we’re going to spend so much time, energy and money trying to build bridges between Russia and America, then why not just build an actual bridge? In 1986 Ronald Reagan gave engineer Tung Yun Lin a National Medal of Science, Lin handed back to him a 16-page plan for an intercontinental peace bridge. Whether for environmental, financial, or political reasons a bridge across the Bering Strait has been on someone’s agenda ever since. Most of this talk has come to nothing, but in 2015 Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping started to make some actual plans. *Theme music* The Bering Strait is a 51 mile sea passage separating Siberia and Alaska. In 1867 the US bought Alaska for 7.2 million dollars or 2 cents an acre. This created a new border right down the middle separating two small islands, Big Diomede (Russian), and Little Diomede (now American). The same boundary is followed today by the International Date Line, giving the Diomedes the adorable nicknames of “Tomorrow Island” and “Yesterday Isle”. Ever since the Cold War Big Diomede and most of Russia’s Eastern Shore has been a military zone. No travel is permitted. In fact, you can’t arrive or depart there even with a Russian visa. The closest you can get is the port of Provideniya, and even then you should probably get permission before rocking up. This hasn’t stopped people trying though, in 2006 Karl Bushby and Dimitri Kieffer navigated the strait’s ice floes on foot. However Lynne Cox swam between the Diomedes in 1987, The public support was so immense that Reagan and Gorbachev thanked her at the signing of the nuclear forces treaty. Gorbachev: “It took a daring American girl by the name of Lynne Cox a mere two hours to swim the distance separating our two countries, By her courage she showed how close to each other our two peoples live.” Trump: “We’re not gonna let them violate a nuclear agreement, and go out and do weapons. So we’re going to terminate the agreement. We’re gonna pull out.” We could really do with another Lynne Cox right now. Something to bring the US and Russia together. The whole world a little closer. Even if it has to be marketed to us as a trade deal or a “Trans-Pacific Infrastructure Investment”. A bridge would be a common project, a physical link forcing superpowers to cooperate. But ignoring all political and financial hurdles for now. Is it even possible? Currently the world’s longest sea bridge is 34 miles across, Connecting Hong Kong to Zhuhai and Macau in China. And although the Bering Strait is 51 miles, the longest bridge you’d actually have to build would only be 26. The Diomedes make two perfect stopping points. You could build a US bridge on one side and a Russian bridge on the other. In fact, make it a race the loser has to build the three-mile bridge connecting the two. Construction would be slow, for seven months of the year the temperature is well below freezing, and although the Strait rarely freezes large chunks of ice are funneled through the passage from the Arctic. These ice floes would exert enormous pressure on any structure we built. There may be engineering solution around this, but perhaps the simplest would be to scrap the bridge and dig a tunnel. Tunnels may not lend themselves to metaphors as well, but they’re warmer, often cheaper over long distances, you can lay gas, oil, and electricity alongside. They’re protected from harsh weather, and ships can still pass above them. With the Arctic ice caps melting, the Bering Strait could become a very busy shipping lane in the next 20 years. The Strait is relatively shallow, the maximum depth is only 55 metres. The Channel Tunnel is a hundred metres below sea level. That opened in 1994 connecting the UK to Europe, and that relationship is going swimmingly. A tunnel (unlike a bridge) doesn’t have to intersect the Diomedes, it can start and end at more convenient points. But therein lies the problem. There are no convenient points. Here’s a map of the Alaskan and Siberian road networks, the closest highways are 2,000 miles apart. In Russia anything east of Magadan is impossible to get to by car. And although there are plans for major Alaskan routes, anything west of Fairbanks is tricky. Tunnelling under the Bering Strait would be the easy part, you’d also have to build thousands of miles of roads, over rough terrain, in incredibly harsh conditions. And after all that you’ve still got to persuade people to drive it. The only sensible option would be a train. You’ll still face all the same obstacles during construction, but a warm high-speed railroad from Anchorage to Vladivostok is way more convenient than a 60 hour drive through the Arctic. The main use of such a railroad would be freight. If we extend the network through North America and into China, it could transport a significant amount of the world’s cargo. But now we’ve got one of the biggest engineering projects in the world, costing hundreds of billions of dollars. Is there a need for it? An Arctic railroad would have to compete with our existing freight network, boats and planes. The busiest shipping route in the world by cargo is China to North America. So let’s say we want to ship one metric ton between the two busiest ports, Shanghai to Vancouver. We’ve got four options; ship, air, rail ,and road. A boat can do it in 15 to 20 days, cost us $300, and produce 225kg of CO2. Plane: 1 day, $3,500, 4,400kg. A train: 2 to 4 days, $400, 630kg. And a truck: 7 to 10 days, $900, 1,050kg. If speed is the priority and money no object, a plane is the way to go. But if speed doesn’t matter and you want the best value for money then shipping is the clear winner. Ships and planes account for 90% of global trade, that is a lot of fuel being burned all day, every day. Diesel trains are not environmentally friendly, but both Alaska and Siberia have stores of untapped geothermal energy. We need to replace as many major transport routes as possible with renewable alternatives, and high-speed electric trains are one of them. There’d definitely be a market for an Arctic railroad, it would dramatically improve travel time without an enormous increase in price. Whether it would be profitable for whoever built it though is another matter. It would have to be a financier with very deep pockets, and probably an ulterior motive. That pretty much leaves three options; Russia, America, or China. China are building railways and shipping ports everywhere. They’re already building high-speed railways connecting Europe, Africa and Asia. All with China as the central hub. They don’t just want to be at the crossroads. They want to be the crossroads, for all future international trade and transport. That means North and South America are definitely on the agenda. In fact, they proposed a high-speed railway connecting china to the US in 2007. Putin has given China approval to build through Siberia. And then in 2015 China and Russia announced they were collaborating, to build the Siberia and Alaska passage together. This is mostly just talk, but it’s getting louder and more frequent. There’s a reasonable chance of it happening with or without US involvement. It would be a real shame if multiple countries didn’t cooperate on this project. Not to mention the dangerous power dynamic it could create. An Arctic railroad connecting China, Russia, and the US would be an amazing achievement. An opportunity for three superpowers, currently jostling for their place in the century, to collaborate on a common project. One that could genuinely improve the world, environmentally, financially, and politically.

    電車 西武 東村山第7号 踏切動画 japan train railroad crossing
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    電車 西武 東村山第7号 踏切動画 japan train railroad crossing

    August 15, 2019


    This is the Higashi-Murayama No. 7 railroad crossing in the Ikebukuro Line and Shinjuku Line of Seibu Railway.
    This signal is located on the south side Tokorozawa Station. Tokyu Corporation 5050-4000 series. Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 10000 series Limited Express (NRA New Red Arrow). Limited Express-type train. Seibu Railway 2000 series (Yellow Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 30000 series (Smile Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 30000 series (Smile Train). Commuter-type train.
    Seibu Ikebukuro line opening 100 anniversary. 30101F Seibu Railway 20000 series. Commuter-type train. Tokyo Metro 10000 series. Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 9000 series RED LUCKY TRAIN. Commuter-type train.
    Red and white. It is a good luck in Japan. Seibu Railway 2000 series (Yellow Train). Commuter-type train. Please use the Google map of the shooting point. Link to the text field. Seibu Railway 6000 series. Commuter-type train.
    Yellow 6000 series train. No fires. Seibu Railway 30000 series (Smile Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 6000 series. Commuter-type train. Earth. Fire protection water tank? Old symbol of Seibu Railway. Seibu Railway 10000 series Limited Express (NRA New Red Arrow). Limited Express-type train. Seibu Railway 30000 series (Smile Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 6000 series. Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 6000 series. Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 2000 series (Yellow Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 6000 series. Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 2000 series (Yellow Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 2000 series (Yellow Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 30000 series (Smile Train). Commuter-type train. Seibu Railway 30000 series (Smile Train). Commuter-type train.