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    Train narrowly misses people crossing railway
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    Train narrowly misses people crossing railway

    April 10, 2020


    Shocking CCTV footage has caught the moment
    a train was forced to make an emergency stop after two people were seen running on the
    tracks. British Transport Police have released this
    video where a train narrowly misses the two young men who are trespassing on the railway
    lines at a Shropshire station. Moments before the terrifying incident, the
    men are seen walking back and forth across the tracks and a group of young women can
    be seen watching them from the platform. After the train driver stops, a search of
    the area was carried out but no-one was found. Police said it was pure luck that no-one was
    injured and that the stunt was incredibly dangerous. They are now appealing for any information
    about those involved in the incident.

    Articles

    Rum Runners | Historical Movie | Drama | Action | HD | Free Full Film

    April 9, 2020


    – [Calvin Coolidge]
    Expenses of the governments of this country, the stupendous sum of about seven billion
    500 million dollars, we get 700 million dollars, is needed by the national government, and the remainder by local governments. Such a sum is difficult to comprehend. It represents all the pay
    of five million wage earners receiving five dollars a day,
    working 300 days in the year. If the government should add
    100 million dollars of expense, it would represent four day, to comprehend. It represents all the pay
    of five million wage earners receiving five dollars a day,
    working 300 days in the year. If the government should add
    100 million dollars of expense, it would represent four days more work of these wage earners. These are some. – [Guard One] You boys in a hurry? – No. Engine’s got a miss in it. – Sounds good to me. – Yeah well, must have
    some rust in the car, it hasn’t been run much since winter. – Say uh, you boys
    wouldn’t happen to have any firearms or booze, do ya? – No, those are illegal. – [Guard One] You want to
    come out and pop the trunk, so we can take a looksie? – No. – [Guard One] What do you mean no? – Well, what’s not to get? It’s two simple letters, an N, an O, put together they spell. (firing) (crashing) (thrilling music) (laughing) – That was hilarious. He looked like a damn turtle
    on his back trying to get up. Man, this the last time
    we can do it this way. – Well, it’s too close for me. It ain’t over yet, get that
    damn baggage packed up. – [Don] Put in the fan if you have to. – [Vic] I am. – Shoulda stole the faster car. – Oh stolen’s such an ugly word, I’d prefer borrow. – Wish they would have
    just taken that bribe, it would have been so much easier. – You just get them damn spikes out, we can get ’em off our asses. – Can’t wait to try these. – [Vic] You’re gonna get the chance. (firing) Whoa! – Son of a bitch, they’re shooting at us. – Yeah, but don’t they know
    they could hurt somebody? Alright, don’t dump ’em yet. Wait ’til we get to
    that turn point bridge. – [Don] Alright. – Alright, you ready? – [Don] Uhuh. – [Vic] Alright, now. (clinking) (laughing) (hissing) (crashing)
    Oh shit. (whirring) – [Both] Oh shit. – [Don] What are we gonna do? – [Vic] Come on. Come on. We gotta jump. – I can’t swim. – You’re almost 30 and you can’t swim? – No. (yelling) (splashing) (yelling) (guns firing) – [Vic] Fuck you feds! (laughing) (groaning) (laughing)
    – You crazy son of a bitch. – Whew. Ah hell Don, think of it this way. We’re sitting here looking
    at beautiful blue skies. Instead of five years in a glass at Walla Walla Penitentiary. Not to mention that 10,000 dollar fine. – Shit, I’d rather a drowned. – Yeah, me too. That’s why we had to jump. – Jump? Some crazy fucker pushed me. (laughing) – Is that what you’re
    gonna tell old Saint Peter when we get up to them pearly gates? Your old buddy Vic pushed you? – Shit, I was fixing to tell somebody, but I doubt very seriously
    it was Saint Peter. I’d be talking to. – Actually I’m starting
    to think about you. You’re a bad influence. – Yeah, right. Hey we better get going. That fat guard wasn’t looking
    too good last time I saw him, I think we might have killed him. – We didn’t do it. – Nothing is ever your fault, is it? – Hey it ain’t our fault he
    can’t drive on four flat tires. – Are we playing by any rules here? – Sure we are. Vic’s rule number one, rules are for pipe smoking dog walkers who don’t like to have any fun in life. – You call this fun? – Hell yeah. – This is only fun if we
    make a bunch of money, and we live through it to spend it. You know it’s 30 miles to
    Colville, we better get going. They’re gonna have the
    dogs after us, alright. We better get going. – Ah shit, I lost my shoes on the jump. – [Don] Yeah me too, let’s move. – [Vic] See if we can
    find a car on the way. (knocking) – Come. Sit. I hear you boys had a
    close call the other day. – Yeah. Yeah, it wasn’t good. Not good at all. Guards, they got a real
    good look at us both. – Not to mention your car. They’ll be coming for damn sure now. – Well, you don’t have
    to worry about that. We borrowed it from some poor bastard on our way through Colville. But um, we can’t take that route anymore. – No. – Not to mention that cop, he might not make it. We need to come up with
    something better, quicker, that’s gonna take some planning. And then we’re gonna need
    to find something else to haul the stuff in. – They wouldn’t take a bribe? – No, we tried that. – [Don] You know if you
    hadn’t been so impatient. – They already made us. Twas our third time through that week. – Let me tell you what
    I’m up against boys. There’s a mining convention next week. There’ll be a lot of tycoons in town. Like Kellogg, Comstock,
    half a dozen others. Then of course we have the rich boys. There’s Zalibach and Werehauyser. Now these two control half of the timber on the west coast. They drop a thousand dollars a night each while they’re in town in
    my speakeasy, I like that. I want to keep them happy. I want to keep them coming back, spending their money in my speak. Now these boys, they’re used to having the best available at all times. Now that includes whiskey and rum, the best whiskey and the best rum. Not that gasoline shit
    that Tiny is manufacturing up on the side of the hill. (scoffing) Now, I need you two to tell me how you’re going to fix this so that we will be very
    happy and much richer by this time next week. I think this business
    meeting is over boys. – Wait, we can’t–
    – Come up with something soon. – We can’t drive it down, but maybe we can bring it down by mules. – (scoffing) I’m not
    dealing with no damn mules. You’re bad enough as it is. – Dear god, you two sound
    like you’re in love. – If you can guarantee
    us five dollars a bottle on our next run, we’ll have your booze, and
    we’ll have it here on time. – And how do you propose to do that? – Fly it in. – Fly it in? (laughing) – Fly it in? Oh, that’s brilliant. That is absolutely brilliant. I suppose we should just
    get wings and sprout ’em and flap ’em and go across
    the border that way, huh? – There’s the old Stearman
    for sale at Felts Field. We’ll go check it out tomorrow. If we can round it up
    we’ll get it up in the air, the next day, we will have
    your booze Mr. Davenport. You have my word on it. – You’ve got your five dollars a bottle. I have a question. When did you learn to fly? – You don’t have to worry about my flying. It’s a done deal then? – Done. Good luck. – [Don] You can’t fly. – Sure I can. A little. – Oh shit, I’d love to see the day you can fly a damn airplane. – You will, tomorrow. – Boys, the door closes on the way out. – [Don] Just because Nick had
    you flying around on the wing at a county fair upside down, does not mean that you know how to fly. – Sure it does. Look he’s taught me a little bit. Just ’cause he don’t fly anymore doesn’t mean he can’t
    give us some pointers. – Yeah that’s great, as
    long as you’ll listen. – You know, we can make
    a pile of dough real fast if you learn how to fly,
    we can get two planes. – Let’s see how one works first. – Look, there’s three speaks in this burg. We can supply ’em all. – They’re talking about
    repealing prohibition. Then what’ll we do? – Start a stillery. There’s one over on Vinegar
    Flats for real cheap. You know, we just have to make
    enough money real fast. – And if this little
    brainstorm of yours works. – Oh it will, we’ll fly real low along the
    river all the way to Canada. On the way back we could
    even buzz the guard towers. (laughing) – Hey man, we’re supposed
    to be keeping a low profile. Louie was right, if we’re too
    flashy we’ll get caught quick. – Yeah well, Louie’s
    just worried about Louie. – Yeah, we can count on one thing, if we get caught he
    will not know our names. We should head on down to Slack Alice’s to see what she’ll pay. – You know that’s not a bad idea. – [Don] Yeah. – Only trouble is can’t see
    Alice without seeing her sister. – Shit. – [Vic] She is sweet on you. – How could I forget about that one. – [Vic] But you know what they say, any old port in the storm will do. – [Don] I would rather ride
    out in Noah’s little storm through a rowboat than
    pull in to that port. (slamming) – [Vic] Hurry up man, I think. Hurry up Don, I think they’re waking up. – [Don] You got it all wired up up there? – [Vic] Yeah, go, go, go. – [Don] Alright, let’s go. (engine starting) (dog barking) (country music) (sputtering) – Ah hell, I think we ran out of gas. – Shoulda checked that before
    we decided to steal this one. – We’ll just go steal another one. – Let’s go get some gas. But you’re siphoning it. – What? Get out there and push. – [Don] I’m not pushing a stolen car down the road.
    – It’s not stolen, it’s borrowed, now get out there and push. – [Don] Terrible idea. – Just push it, let’s get some gas. (rumbling) – Pretty nice Buick. Think it might be time to
    take it off the market. – Yeah, we’ll grab it on the way out. – Absolutely. (clanging) – Oh it’s you guys. Ain’t seen you boys for a spell. – Yeah, we’ve been busy. – So I’ve heard. – Alice up there? – Yeah. – I suppose Kate is too? – Oh yeah, she’s all keyed
    up for you Donny boy. – Shit. – Tiny is too, so be careful. – [Vic] Alright. Ring us up, okay? – Alright. (creaking) – Well, well, well, what
    brings you boys slumming? – [Vic] Oh Don here got a little lonesome. – Kate, come see who we got at our door. – [Kate] Oh. – Damn it, do you have to. – Come on now, be a sport. It’s nice to bat our eyes
    on some good looking guys for a change. – Sure is. – Well we got a little
    proposition for you dames. – Mh mh, why don’t you come on in? – [Vic] Nah, this is business. – Ah damn, business before pleasure. – [Don] There’ll be none of that. – Now Don’s just a little shy. (piano music) ♫ I got a craving for you ♫ Can’t seem to satisfy it – [Alice] Can I buy you boys a drink? – Oh no, allow us. Don, where you going girly? Four glasses please. Now we’re gonna have this for sale soon. Thought you might be interested. – See what you boys got here. – [Vic] Give it a taste. – Mh, that’s pretty
    good, how much you want? – Seven bucks. – You’re killing me. Don’t you know I don’t have
    the high polluting clientele that Louie’s got? Let’s try six. – Hey Leo, try this. You know if you had better booze, you might have a better
    class of riff raff. (laughing) – Leo here’ll drink anything. ♫ I couldn’t help but cry ♫ So now I miss you daily ♫ All I do is sit and sigh (crashing) (laughing) Pour me another one, yeah ’cause that’s how I want my customers. – Well hell that’s 151 proof. Think about it this way, you can water it down and be
    like pennies for a nickel. – Yeah, like you won’t? – No, I supply you with goods. Do with it what you will. – Seven it is then. Chowmein, come clean this mess up. – Mr. Leo. Mr. Leo, Mr. Leo. You kill Mr. Leo again! Hire someone sing. (yelling) (dramatic thrilling music) – [Don] Good pour. – See you all in a couple days. – Sounds good. (sighing) – Guys wouldn’t be trying to
    tattle your molasses down here, would ya? – [Vic] Nah, we’re just
    here having a drink with the lovely ladies. – Okay well, this is my town and uh, it’s not big enough for all of us. – [Vic] I think we’re alright. We’d hate to see you have to scram. – Oh I won’t be going anywhere boys. – Hey now, now boys. We don’t have funny business in here. – Yeah, we don’t need
    – Boys. – [Kate] To damage the goods. – We’ll go ‘head and see you out. – It’s still here. No, no, no, Don. Let’s borrow this one. – [Don] Yeah, let’s
    liberate this fine machine. (engine starting) – [Vic] Woowee, sure is
    pretty, ain’t she Don? – [Don] Looks to be pretty
    much top of the line. – Oh excuse me boys. This plane isn’t for sale right now. I’ve got work to do on her. I would like you to look at
    that one right on down there. We could make a sweet deal if you were to have a look at that one. – Why that one? – Well I’m busy with this one.
    – Aw, she’s alright, she’s alright, let’s take a look at her. (whimsical music) Well Don, what do you think? – [Don] I don’t know man. – Sounds good, let’s go
    see how much he wants. Alright, how much do you want? – 2500 and not a penny less. – I’ll tell you what, we’ll give you 1700, deal? – Aw god, you guys are crazy. I had two offers last week for 2000. This old gal is worth three. I’m making you a deal at 25. If I was to fly this plane down to Pasco, I could get three easy. – Why don’t you fly it down to Pasco then? – Well I’ll tell you why. – Sure you will. – Last year I flew down to
    Pasco and I came in a little low and I hooked the tail
    skid on the telephone line at the end of the runway. I got out, I had to pull
    20 feet of wire off of it. I’m really kind of
    scared to go back there. I’ll tell ya boys, ’cause I like you so much
    I’ll let you make payments. – Oh yeah? – Yeah, a thousand now and a
    thousand five minutes from now. And you boys have got
    yourself a sweet deal. – Oh hell Gabby, don’t go out and hurt yourself there. Tell you what, we’ll take her. But we’d like to take
    her out for a spin first. – Yeah, sure, you boys done much flying? – Yeah, actually kinda. – Kinda? – Well maybe I ought to go with you. – No, no, no, no we’ll be fine. If you just get that old crane
    running, we’ll do the rest. – Give us a hand. – Switch on. – [Gabby] Wait, wait,
    haven’t you ever started a round engine before? – No, I’ve only flown an Eagle Rock. – [Gabby] You have to pull it through or you’ll bend a rod, sure as hell. – Alright, sorry. – [Gabby] Okay, switch on. – Switch on. – Switch on. (whimsical music) (whirring) (whirring) – You stupid sons of bitches. – Whewhehehew. Whew. You alright Don? – Soon as you get me
    out of this damn thing. – Whew. See, told you I could fly. (whimsical music) Nick. – Yeah I guess so, let’s go see what he has
    to say about this plane. – You bought that off that old coot, huh? – Yup. Said he just had it overhauled, if you believe anything
    he has to say, that is. – Yeah but I think he did it himself, and that may or may not be a good thing. – Yeah well. We’re gonna take it up for
    a little job to Colville. – Need fuel? – Yeah, and a puke pail. – Or somebody standing
    out on the wings and flap. I don’t know Don, you up for that? – You can kiss my ass Vic. – He didn’t think too
    much of his first flight. – Well, some can be more
    exciting than others, that’s for sure. – He thinks he’s a pilot, being as you flew him around
    a few times on the wing. – You remember the time we flew the plane under the bridge with
    them fisherman on top? (laughing) – Yeah, it took us three hours to get all that fishing
    gear off the plane. – Well this is all very reassuring. – Well, stop by anytime
    if I can be of any help. (whirring) Boy just like his daddy. (dramatic music) (whirring) (honking) – You can just put it in the elevator. (clinking) – That’s all of it, right? – Yup. – Send us a little closer to hell. – 10. Makes 130. – Should be enough to
    get us into a card game? – [Don] Mhm. – Make it 150. Is that all you can carry in
    that little plane of yours? – Well, no. – Well then who are you selling it to? – Slack Alice. She’s giving us eight dollars a bottle. – God damn it! I’ll give you 7.50, and
    I want every delivery for the next two weeks. – Eight. – Eight. Eight? That is robbery. – Well then none. I already have another buyer. – Alright Vic, alright. Don’t be hasty. Look, I need that booze. I’ve got a big convention
    and I am running short. Those boys, they love their rum. – Make it eight then. (sighing) – Okay, but I want you to promise that I get every delivery
    for the next two weeks. Is that a deal? – Sure Louie, you got a deal. – That’s Mr. Davenport to you. – Okay, so we best get going then huh? Damn, it looks like rain. – Yeah. I think we should just
    go scare up a card game, what do you think? – There’s fish in there to catch. Let’s do it. – Alright. (honking) Open up. Come on, we were just in
    there, let us back in. – Password? (honking) Not without the password. (dogs barking) (laughing) Give me a minute. – [Vic] Open up! – [Guard] What’s the password? – Come on man, let us in. (laughing) Mother. Mother fucking load, now open up. – [Guard] We got fish to catch. (soft classical music)
    (faint chatting) – You mind if we going you gents? – No, not at all. Might change the luck. – [Player] Yeah, deal me out. – [Vic] Vic Hansen. – [Don] Don Collier. – [Host] Noah Kellogg. Eddie Werehauyser. – Good to meet you. – [Kellogg] Mr. Comstock. – Oh damn Don. How are we gonna split up
    a silver mine, a gold mine, and a lumber mill? – [Kellogg] What do you
    got to lose their rooster? – He’s no rooster, I’d
    call him more a sparrow. – [Werehauyser] Oh, how’s that? – ‘Cause he’s full of shit
    and he chirps all day. – No, no, he’s right. All I got is an old airplane. – Really? I’ve always wanted to go up
    in one of those contraptions. – [Vic] Oh yeah? Yeah, I’ll take you up for
    a spin around the patch. – I don’t believe this man
    appears to be suicidal. (laughing) – Let’s just play cards. – What can I get for you sir? – I’ll have a shot of rum, thanks. Thank you. – No problem. – Comstock. – Nay. – You know that man over there? – [Comstock] No can’t says I do. – He said he was the vice
    president of Anaconda Mining. – That’s bullshit. He looks more like a G
    man than a miner to me. I think that son of a
    bunker here last June when the government was
    inspecting up there. – Yeah, well I’d hate to lose this joint. We’d all end up at Alice’s. – That would be terrible. (chuckling) – Ask David, he’s around here somewhere. Louie here. – Yeah, we just came from his office. – I think I’ll sit this one out. – Yeah, just as cards get hot you bug out. – Don’t worry, I’ll be back. I’ll have this fine young
    lady sit down for me. – [Liz] Oh, oh no, I may lose. – Hey, that’s all your worried about? Don’t. There’s plenty more where that comes from. I’m taking it out of the
    ground by the train load every day. Here, you sit down and keep my seat warm. Might even be a little
    something in it for you to keep. Here. Now these guys won’t even know I’m gone. – [Comstock] Well, she
    is easier on the eyes. (knocking) – Come. – Sir, Mr. Kellogg wishes
    to have a word with you. – It’s okay, please have him come in. – Louie. – Noah, you’re looking well as always. – Yourself as well. – Thank you. – Is there something I can do for you? – Yeah. Your place has built itself up
    to be quite a little business since the last time I was here. – Thank you. – That might be short lived, unless you do something
    about the government agent that somehow snuck inside. – What, what are you talking about Noah? What? Where? Can you point him out to me? – The bartender said he
    claims to be connected with the Anaconda Mine Company. You can check that out for yourself. The owner’s a guy named Marcus Daily. He’s seated over there with the cigar. Gentleman far to the left here. Gentleman is the guy down at
    the end of the bar, black coat. – Thank you Noah. I’ll talk to Mr. Daily
    you’ll be here, I presume. Rick. – [Rick] Yes sir. – Please. – [Rick] Yes sir. – Take Mr. Kellogg, give him
    anything he needs at the bar. – [Rick] Will do sir. – Thank you Rick. (soft classical music)
    (faint chatting) – Evening gentlemen. Louie Davenport. I’m the proprietor of this establishment. Mr. Daily, may I speak to you in private for one moment sir? – Sure thing Mr. Davenport. What can I do for you? – The gentleman at the end
    of the bar, black coat. You recognize him, he
    says he works for you? – Never seen him before. Certainly doesn’t work for me. Has kind of a clean cop
    look, don’t you think? – My thought exactly. Thank you so much for your help Mr. Daily. Get back to your game and
    have a wonderful evening. – I will, thanks Louie. – If you need anything,
    please don’t hesitate to ask. How is everything Rick? – [Rick] Oh very well sir. – Good, good. Excuse me sir, I’d like to
    speak to you in my office. – [Agent] Why? – Because you’ve entered
    my club uninvited, and you’re not whom you purport to be. – [Agent] I’m with the Anaconda. – That’s part of the problem, sir. I’ve spoken to the owner of the Anaconda. And he says you don’t, and
    intend to agree with him. So, would you like to follow me or do I need to get assistance? (dramatic music) Sit down. – In that case, I’m Agent Bachman. And I’ve been watching
    your little club here for quite some time. You might have to speak to
    my superiors about that, if you know what I mean? – Sit the fuck down! (scuffling) Now. That was a much more truthful answer. So, what will it take for you to forget about our little club? – 20%. – 20%? That’s very decent. So let’s see, 20% for you, 20% for the chief of police,
    20% to keep my boys happy. Oh, then we have the distributors. So let me see, next time
    somebody comes in here and asks me for 20%, I
    should just give it to ’em. (slamming)
    Fuck you, and fuck your police chief! – I’ve been watching your flight boys. They might have to go down to. Down with ya. (thudding) – You’re not gonna say a lot if the speaking parts are missing. Now, we don’t have a lot of time.
    (gurgling) What are you going to tell your superiors? I can’t hear you. What are you going to tell your superiors? Damn. I don’t think we’re ever gonna know what he was gonna tell his superiors. – [Hans] What do you want
    to do with the body boss? – Take him over to Meddle Road. Cut off his fucking head
    and throw him on the tracks. Put his head in a mail bag. Give it to Vic. Tell him to drop in the river
    on his next fucking trip up to Canada, and get this hunk of shit out of my office before
    he spoils my new rug. – [Hans] Alright. – So what you’re saying is, we’ll clean the fuel out of the tank, and we’ll just fill her up. – Yeah, I mean we can carry twice as much without the weight of
    all those damn bottles. – Sounds good to me. – Louie wants you to
    drop this in the river. (thudding) Next trip. – Damn, what is it? – Maybe it’s best that you don’t know, or you can ask Louie yourself. – Well what is it? – [Don] I don’t know, let’s find out. Holy shit. – What is it? – [Don] It’s that guy
    from the other night. – Oh! (gagging) Oh, it stinks. Oh. Damn it Louie. Damn it! – [Don] Jesus. (knocking) – Yeah? What is it Rick? – We’re running out of rum
    and whiskey Mr. Davenport. – I know, the boys are bringing
    in another load tonight, we’ll be fine. – Oh okay, got you boss. Oh Tiny wants to see you too. – What the fuck does he want? – With him, who knows. – Alright. Send him in. Oh and by the way Rick, can you make sure that that
    new shipment of glasses we got from Seattle is cleaned and ready for this evening? – Yes sir. – And can you send Hans up. – Will do sir. – What do you want Tiny? – [Tiny] I think you know. Doors have been way down lately. I’d like to know what
    the hell is going on. – It’s like this. You see the rich clientele that
    I have in my establishment, they like good booze. Not that gasoline shit that you’re brewing up there on the hill. So we’ve been flying the
    good stuff in from Canada. Simple as that. – [Tiny] Well let me tell you, it ain’t as simple as that Louie. The cops still gotta get paid, and my boss in Chicago
    still wants his money. – You got a problem,
    haven’t you there Tiny? But it ain’t my problem. (slamming) – Well maybe it’ll get to be your problem when the shipments stop
    coming down from Canada and I got to charge you double
    to make up for my losses. – What makes you think you
    can come into my office and tell me what to do? I don’t need your cheap
    shit gasoline Tiny. Now get your ass out of
    my office you little fuck before I tell Hans to teach
    you how to fucking fly. Hans! – [Hans] This midget bothering you boss? – Who you calling a midget
    you fucking overgrown gorilla. – Prepare for your first flight. – Oh fuck. (crashing) You son of a bitch. Fuck you. – [Hans] Now flap the stubby wings. Hey, that’s better. – Really don’t think we
    should have done that. He has connections with Chicago. I don’t think Tiny is
    gonna take that too well. (whirring) (thudding)
    (splashing) (whimsical music) – Good evening boys. You know I grew up with your families. Been to your houses. Sat at your tables, shared bread with you. And I want to let you know, you boys have really got
    my butt in a predicament over all this booze here. And I don’t like it. (spitting) What’s more, the feds
    now are looking to me for some answers on that missing officer who was snooping around. I am not used to this kind of scrutiny. They did find his body yesterday though. Over in Hillyard. It was a real mess after
    the 905 ran over him. But they haven’t been
    able to find his head. Now you boys wouldn’t know
    anything about that, would you? – No, sir. – Well I’m here to tell you. The rumor is the feds are
    now taking bribes from Tiny. So the heat is gonna turn way up on this little rum business of yours that seems to arrive from heaven. (clinking) – Well I’m sure that this will help keep ’em off our asses now, won’t it? – For a while. But just for a while. One of you boys cut yourself? – No, we picked up a pig for
    our barbecue this weekend. (scoffing) (sighing) – You know that asshole might
    have been over our house for dinner a couple times, but he sure as hell was
    never invited by us. – Still a pain in the ass. – Hey you remember that one time he arrested us for driving
    that old motorcycle through the pool hall? We were just a little drunk. – A little drunk? Yeah, yeah you couldn’t hit the backdoor. – Oh I hit it. – Oh yeah, I remember, I got
    the scars to prove it too. I guess that’s why this
    is all illegal now, huh? – Hey I was fine until you
    decided to try to fall off. – I only decided to try to fall off because you decided to try
    and take a table with us. (laughing) We were safer in lockup that night. – Yeah. He’s still an asshole. Come on, let’s go get the truck. (whirring) (grand music) (soft music) – Another 200 for
    dropping off that parcel. – You know, I don’t know what it was, but it left a bloodstain in
    my hangar that the chief saw. Don’t involve us in your dirty work. – You already are. (clinking) Look, I’m running a little short on booze. I need you to make another run. – Problem is we can’t
    carry as much as we want. The bottles are heavy. – I’ve got an idea that might fix that. – Well spit it out. – I was thinking–
    – Look, you two work out the details. But be careful. The feds have been sniffing around, and that asshole chief, he’s
    starting to be a real problem. Just watch your backs okay,
    that’s all I’m saying. – Told you he was an asshole. Yeah, we saw him earlier. We had to give him a case
    of rum to keep him happy. – He asked about that fed
    that got run over on Hillyard. – What did you tell him? – Can’t talk about something
    we don’t know anything about. – Good, that’s very good. So. You gave him a case of rum? With what I’m paying him,
    he should be very happy. – Yeah well I still wouldn’t trust him. – Look, I want you to
    do another run tomorrow. – Getting a little pushy, aren’t you? We’ll fly when we want to. – Okay, I’m just worried
    that I might run out. Now get the fuck out of my office and let me listen to my music. (soft whimsical music) – Suppose if we cleaned
    out that upper fuel tank and jutst filled it with run. Just run our fuel out of the bottom tank. – No, cause as you the
    gas out of the other tank it’s gonna throw the
    center of gravity off. You’re gonna hit the ground
    like a ton of turnips. – Hm, well we can haul twice as much rum if we could just figure this out. – Oh it’ll work, ’til you boys start
    putting vodka and whiskey and everything else in this damn thing – That’s just the name of the game. We’re gonna go to jail
    for a little or a lot. – You can try it. If it kills you I’m a be the first one to say I told you so. – I like to save the brass, if it kills me I’ll be
    the first one to say damn, that old Nick sure knew
    what he was talking about. – [Don] I don’t suppose I have
    any say in this, now do I? – No Don, you make too much sense. – Let’s give it a shot. (whirring) Howdy. Bet you weren’t expecting us
    back so soon, now were you? – Well you sure are a thirsty lot. Business must be pretty good, eh? – It sure is. So good we can barely handle it. We’re gonna need a whole barrel. – Where you gonna put it all? – In the fuel tank. – Oh dear. I hope you boys don’t outsmart yourselves. – I wouldn’t worry
    about that one too much. (whirring) (whimsical music) – I’m revenue agent Marshan, and I’m gonna inspect your plane. – Revenue agent, by what authority? – By authority of the
    United States government, that’s whose authority. I suspect you two of
    violating the Volstead Act. I mean, you’ve got this
    nice looking plane here and you’re supposed to be
    working for the railroads, but I don’t really see you two doing much. – Well mister revenue agent,
    you got any proof of that. Well damn Don, that thing sure was pretty. You must have spent a
    lot of time polishing it. – Yeah, okay. I’ve been looking through your log books. You guys have been spending a lot of time up in Colville. I’d just like to know
    what your business is. – Well, see, my mom lives up
    there and she’s real sick. – Colville is mighty close to Canada. It takes the two of you to
    look out for your mother? – [Vic] Well see, if you had
    met my mother you would know. – It’s gas, and it’s full sir. – [Vic] Of course it is, we just went up to Colville and back. (chuckling) – Damn, and I thought that was the plane we were looking for. – Well hell, why don’t you just tell us what you’re looking for. You know, maybe we can help. – Rum, mister. Illegal booze. – I’m sorry we couldn’t
    have been more help. I guess it’s just not your lucky day. Now if you don’t mind, quit
    wasting our fucking time. Sure would like to put
    the old lady back to bed. – Yeah well, I’m gonna take off for now. But you two have not seen the last of me. I’ll be around. – Oh I hope so, this has been a pleasure. – Feds. – Bye chief. Oh look at that, Doolittle’s in town. Louie’s gonna be hot for tonight. – Jimmy always was good for business. Who’s that he’s got with him? – Hell if I know. But she sure is lumpy
    in all the right places. Come on, let’s go. (knocking) – Come. Well, how’d it go boys? – Good, real good. Brought in over 10 cases. – Good. – You know Louie. Chief came in to pay us a
    visit, and he’s still out there. He’s not a happy guy. You know you might want to have him over for one of your drinks,
    if you know what I mean. We got a real good thing going on here, and can’t have him going back on our deal. – You’re right. We do have a real good
    thing going on here. You know when those miners left they were one happy bunch. I’m gonna need another delivery tomorrow. By tomorrow night this
    place will be packed with rip roaring cowboys, and you know how much
    they like their whiskey. Then we got the fly boys
    coming in for the races, and well, we know that they’re
    such refined gentlemen. – No, that’s not a problem. But, we might need a little help with some more bottling. – What? What happened to the last
    two girls I sent you? I didn’t see them for two days. (chuckling) – Hey, bottling is hard work Louie. They’re probably catching
    up on some sleep. – Right, sleep. You know what, I’m gonna try
    to keep Tiny off your neck, and then I’ll try to
    sidetrack the feds, okay. – I think you’re right about Tiny, I think he’s gonna be really upset about our deal with Alice. – As I’ve said before boys, I think you are going to start a war. And you know damn well that I’ve had Tiny thrown out of here once. – Really wish I was there to see that. – No, you don’t. Wasn’t pretty. (dramatic music) – There she is. Who’s that girl? That lady right there with the olive skin in the white beret. She came in with Doolittle’s guy. Is she one of Doolittle’s girls? (chuckling) – Her? (clearing throat) She’s Whirlwind Billy, the owner of the Wild West Show, daughter. She’s here doing promotions on the air races with Doolittle. – Oh no. I’ve seen this look before. Never ends well. – I want to meet her. – Why do you want to go
    and do a thing like that? She’s just gonna break your little heart. (whispering) – Sure you will, I’ll
    believe that when I see it. You know, there’s not talking
    to him when he gets like this. (chuckling) – Oh boys, boys, boys. Come on. I’ll take you down and introduce you. (chatting) Come on. I’ll introduce you. Doolittle, Kitt, ladies. I hope you’re finding everything
    in my club to your liking. – Well, well, look what
    the cat dragged in. Yeah speaking of the dead rodents, I see you’re still living up
    to your nickname, Doolittle. – Good, that’s what I like to hear, friendly conversation. – Hansen, are you really gonna enter that old crate of yours in the races? – [Vic] No, I feel real bad
    about making a grown man cry. – Kitt, I’d like to introduce
    you to an associate of mine. This is Vic Hansen, and
    his partner, Don Collier. Gentlemen, I have the
    pleasure of introducing Ms. Kitt Hawkins. – What an unusual name
    for such a lovely lady. – Why thank you. Hansen. You know I went to
    school with a Vic Hansen for a short time. – Ah, my name is Vic, but I went to school on
    a little bump in the road halfway to Colville, Hidden Valley. – So did I for the first two years. You know my name is really Ann Smith. – Wow. I’ll be damned. – Yes you will be. You were always pulling on my pigtails. – I was always trying
    to get your attention. – Well you did then and you are now. – It finally worked. – So what is it you do Vic? – I’m a pilot. It’s Mrs. Hawkings, right? – Yes, but I’m not married. I had to change my name for the stage. I mean, wouldn’t you, if your name was Ann Smith. – Hell yes I would if
    my name was Ann Smith, I would have been beaten a lot. (laughing) – Well a pilot, huh?
    – Mhm. – So do you live here? – Yeah, yup. I’d love to take you up sometime. Maybe tomorrow, tomorrow morning? – Yeah, I’d like that. – Um Vic, I’m sorry they’ll be
    a little busy tomorrow, Kitt. Boys have a little errand
    to run for me tonight. I have an idea. Why don’t you all come to my invitation a big ball I’m throwing
    tomorrow night at the hotel. – That’s a great idea. Kitt, you gonna be available tomorrow? – Yeah, yeah that sounds wonderful. – Alright then, I’ll see you tomorrow. – [Kitt] Alright. – Do you want to drag a hoof? – Yeah, sure. (clinking) – Hello, lo, lo, lo. Hello. It’s great to be back in my old home town. Even though it is for just a short while. Now, would you like to hear
    something from my new album, I’ve Got a Girl?
    (cheering) I’ll take that as a yes. Now, think you can
    remember the way it goes? – [Pianist] Hell yeah, I
    can even play it backwards. – Alright, you play it backwards and I’ll sing it forward,
    and we’ll see where we land. (clinking) (soft music) ♫ In the city ♫ After dark ♫ There’s a place – You know, he has a great set of pipes. – She sure does. – He’s talking about Bate, you idiot. ♫ Feels so right ♫ Dancing through
    (rumbling) Maybe we should get out of this damn game. – Yeah? Can we afford that? How much we got in cash? – Damn if I know, but feels like my mattress
    is about two feet thicker. – Well what else are we gonna do if we’re not doing this? – I don’t know, go to Mexico or Cuba, somewhere soft. Start a distillery. This damn prohibition can’t last forever. – Shit, we’re being followed. – I can’t really see, but
    it looks like fucking Tiny. – Louie’s right, it’s gonna get hot. – Let’s get out of here man, step on it. Let’s get this show on the road. – Kind of late for you two fly boys to be taking off, ain’t it? – It’s my mother, she’s
    taking a turn for the worse. – Oh yeah, that’s the one that
    lives up in Colville, right? – That’s the only one I got. How many do you got? – You two are really some
    great comedians, ain’t ya? – I am. He’s a straight man. Well mister revenue agent, hate to be rude but we
    really gotta get going. Come on, help me up. (whirring) – Hey Joe, how’s that woman of yours. – [Tiny #1 Man] Yeah. – Shit, how’s your mother? – [Tiny #1 Man] Better than most. – Tiny up there? Listen, I don’t need this shit alright. We can shoot you down tonight. Just let me go up the
    damn mountain, alright. Oh. Damn. (dramatic music) (fire crackling) Tiny. Haven’t seen you around a lot, so I figured I come out and see how your little shit ass is doing. – You know if you’re
    out here for some dough we ain’t got any. This is the first time
    we started the still up in over a week. – You know, that’s not my concern. My concern is collecting the fee. – The fee? Why don’t you collect your fucking fee off of those two rumrunners that are working my territory and they’re stealing my business. You know if you bastards
    would arrest those two, we might all be back at the dough. You know another thing, the boss has been
    wondering what’s going on, maybe if I told him that you cops weren’t doing your job, then we’d see what your
    fee looks like, huh? – Yeah, well we’ve had trouble
    catching them with the goods. Maybe you can do something about that, but that doesn’t matter. What I’m concerned about is our fee. Those fly boys took off
    sometime after dark, they should be back around midnight. I think tonight’s a good
    night for a snipe hunt. Not much of a moon and all,
    but that’s not what matters. What matters is that we get
    our money and we get it soon. Or you’re not gonna like
    the next time I visit. – God damn. When this batch is done shut her down. Get your guns boys, we’re going to town. Those son of a bitches have pissed me off. – Alright. – Yahoo, let’s go get ’em! – Time we did something. – [Man In Tan Hat] About god damn time. – [Tiny] Alright, you
    two guys go over there. We’ll be over here. And when those son of a
    bitches come over us to land, we’re gonna let ’em have it. Down right here. (rustling) (whimsical music) Here they come boys. (guns firing) Give me that rifle. (whirring)
    (guns firing) – Got my leg. – [Tiny] I think I got ’em boys. – Put her down. – Hey boss, who the hell was that, tipping ’em off with the light? – I don’t know, let’s go
    down there and find out. What the fuck are you doing out here? – Snipe hunt, looks like it works, I’ve caught a worthless piece of shit. – [Tiny] You son of a bitch. Get him boys. (whirring) (crashing) (hissing) (booming) (groaning) – Don. Don. Oh shit. Oh. Don, Don. Hey, somebody! Somebody help! Don, Don! Somebody help! Hey, Don. Somebody! Anyone, help! (soft music) ♫ There’s nothing I couldn’t do ♫ And nothing I wouldn’t – Ah. Ms. Hawkins. Kitt, you look ravishing. My god, you are beautiful. – Thank you. What a wonderful hotel you have. Have you seen Vic? – Oh, oh I’m so sorry my dear. Nobody told you. Vic’s plane crashed yesterday. – What? Is he okay, is he alive? – Yes, yes he’s alive. He’s a little bruised, but
    other than that he’s fine. It was (whispering) – Well where is he? – He’s in the Deaconess Hospital. – Can you take me there? – [Davenport] Of course. – Can we go right away? – Of course, of course. Hans. Would you please have my driver
    take Kitt to the hospital. – Of course. – Thank you. – Thank you. (soft music) (chatting) Hey. – Damn, I thought an angel
    came to take me away. – Oh, one has. – Yes, I believe she has. (groaning) – Well, looks like all the
    important parts are in tact. How’s Don? – He’s in pretty bad shape. (sighing) Lost a lot of blood. The doctors, doctors say they may not be able to save his leg. Bullet shattered his knee real bad. – Bullet? – We were shot down. – Who would do that? And why? – Oh, you see. Don and I, we haven’t really been flying for fun, we’ve been running some
    booze up in Canada. Seems that the natives aren’t
    really too excited about that. We ruffled enough feathers and put a pretty big target on our back. – Well, guess you couldn’t
    exactly call the cops in a situation like that. – No, not to mention local police have brought in
    a couple of federal agents and, they’re all on the pay roll
    of some big galoot named Tiny. We can’t go anywhere, especially in the condition Don is in. Getting killed comes to
    mind if we do anything. – Will you let me help? – How? We’re in this way too deep. – I can fly. (laughing) Stop that, it hurts too much. – What? I can drive a car, I can even work on it. – I’m sure you can.
    – Why can’t I fly with you? – Besides, why would you want to? I thought you were Doolittle’s girl. – I’m no one’s girl. My mother left when I was
    seven, I never knew why. My father passed away after
    being kicked by a horse. I was 10. Billy took me in and, raised
    me like I was his own. I’ve never met anyone like you. So when I heard what happened I got this feeling in my stomach, I thought I’d never see you again. Don’t leave me out here
    just flapping in the wind like other people have done. I can’t take any more heartache. Jimmy would just be here
    today and gone tomorrow. – Alright miss, if Mr.
    Hansen’s going home tomorrow he needs to get some rest. – Will you come get me tomorrow. – Of course. What time? – [Nurse] Doctor comes in at 10. – Okay, I’ll see you at 10. – Kitt. Sorry about the ballroom at Louie’s. – It’s okay, I’m just glad you’re alright. – At least your feet won’t hurt tomorrow. – What? You didn’t want to dance with me? You, you can dance, right? – I don’t know if I’ve ever tried sober. – Come on now, time to get. (whimsical music) – [Vic] Don, you got some visitors bud. – Nick? You look like hell. What happened to you. – That fucking Tiny and his gorillas caught me at the end of the runway. – That was you? With the light? – Yeah I was working
    late, seen ’em come in, grabbed a light and went down there. – Thanks man. Doctor said I get to keep my leg. They don’t have to hack it off. But, my eye is gone. Nothing they can do to save it. – [Vic] I’m sorry buddy. Looks like your flying days are over. – What am I gonna do now? Not much work for a one eyed guy. – [Vic] We always talked
    about starting a distillery. – Well. Can’t let me drag you down like that. – Well, maybe my dad
    can find you something. – Thank. He work in installs? Thanks, but no thanks. – [Vic] I’m gonna go look at a speed in the upper head Coeur d’Alene tomorrow. I’ll let you know what I find. – You go that plane. I’ll be up there in two weeks, you watch. – [Vic] You’ll always be my partner, but I don’t think you can fly. You’ve got no depth perception. – Why not, it’d be no
    different than flying with you. – Well, let’s take my plane tomorrow. – How is it that you have a plane? – Well it’s not mine, it’s my dad’s. I do a couple stunts
    at the wild west show, draws a crowd. – You sure it’s the plane? – You must be on drugs. – [Vic] Get a good night’s rest. – I’ll be out soon man. – [Vic] We know. – Come get me. – [Vic] We know. – Alright. – [Nick] Goodbye buddy. – Love you guys. (phone dialing) – Hello. Could I have Fairview 335 please. Thank you. Hello? Yes, is Vic Hansen there please. Oh, I see. Ah yes could you tell
    him that Louie Davenport wishes to speak to him
    as soon as possible. Thank you so much. (knocking) – You wanted to see me? – Yeah Vic, you’re
    looking well, can you sit? Heard you boys took a nasty spill. – Yeah, I’m alright, but Don, he took it real hard. Lost an eye. It’s gonna take some time,
    but he’s coming around. He’s still alive anyway. – Glad to see you both made it. Look Vic, I’m just about
    out of rum and whiskey. When do you think you’ll be well enough to be up flying again? – You’re about out, huh? – Yeah, out of everything. – Well I got a new plane,
    we would like to try it out. – We? What Don’s out of hospital already? – No, training a new pilot. (chuckling) – Who would be dumb enough to go up and train as a pilot with you, Vic? – Kitt, she’s not dumb. She’s just adventurous
    enough to try something new. Besides, it’s not hard spending time with her. We’ve tried to go out a couple days. – I’m gonna be out of
    everything tomorrow night. I want you to do a run tonight Vic. – Be careful Louie, you’re
    gonna piss me off again. – I need the booze Vic. – Alright. Nine clams then. I got to pay for a new plane. – You know, we had a real good thing going until you decided to get greedy. – We done here? – Yeah. (dramatic music) (clinking) – Tiny. – I see you’ve taken up
    with those bastards now. – They have good booze,
    my customers like it. (thudding) (crashing) Don’t act like that in here. That’s gonna cost you a hundred
    dollars, get out of here. – You best enjoy it. ‘Cause that’s the last you’re gonna see. – And don’t go doing anything stupid now. (whimsical thrilling music) (rumbling) (whirring) (whirring) (whirring) (groaning) – Holy shit. Hey. – [Vic] What happened? – [Kitt] You alright? – My head’s killing me. – We were hit by lightening. – By lightening? – Yeah. – Strange thing happened
    while we were up there. After we were hit, whole plane slid up. Stayed that way for a few minutes. – That seemed almost fire. – Whatever it was, sure was neat. – Oh I’m so glad that you were concerned about our wellbeing. – I figured, if we’re going down, might as well have fun with it. – Oh my god, look at
    the hole in the plane. Can’t believe we got out of there. – Yeah. It’s a good thing I was with you. – Thank you. (dramatic music) (splashing) – [Davenport] Thank you for that Vic. By the way, how’s that
    little girl of yours turning out as pilot? – Oh, damned good. You know we were hit by
    lightening last night. If it wasn’t for her I
    would have been laid out in some field somewhere,
    because I was knocked out cold. – [Davenport] You okay? – Yeah, I am now, but I had a hell of headache. – [Davenport] Speaking of aches, that one in our ass was
    outside the cub last night. He said that he’s going to get you and me, so I’m warning you, we both better watch our backs. – Knock knock, can I come in. – [Davenport] Yes. – Hey. – [Davenport] Vic was just filling me in on your adventure of last night. (laughing) When can you have the plane ready? You know the races are this weekend. – Oh, we’ll have her stitched up and back in the air in no time. – Yeah. – [Davenport] Good. I have a lot of money riding on that. – Nick. – [Nick] Good as new. – [Vic] Ah, thank you. Sorry I wasn’t much good
    with this hurt wing. – I didn’t notice any difference. – Well Kitt, ready to go
    up, take it for a spin? – [Kitt] Yup. – You guys have fun. – [Kitt] Thanks. – Thanks buddy. (soft music) (whirring) Thank god it stopped raining. – Wow. See, you had a plan right. – Oh yeah. Been wanting to bring you here for weeks. This is one of my favorite spots. – [Kitt] Well I’m glad
    you did, it’s beautiful. – Come on, get under, it’s
    starting to rain again. – Geeze, good god Houdini. You got anything else in that bag? – Oh yeah. You’re the most important part. Thanks for coming. – Thank you. He keeps me in line or
    else I just wing out, out of control. – And Nick? – Nick, Nick’s an old friend of my dad’s. He’s like a second father to me. You know he still does some flying, but his health’s not too good. – Well, sounds like you need something to keep you under control. – Yes, I do. It’s getting late. – Yeah.
    – Shall we see if we get this old wreck to take us home? – Yeah. Thanks for pulling on my pigtails. I wouldn’t have noticed if you hadn’t. (whirring) (sawing) – Where’s that fucking Frankie? – He’s in Chicago, doing a job for AL. – Oh fuck. Who else do we got as a dropper? – Big Foot Bob. – Nah, he’s too sloppy. I need somebody that
    can jimmy an aircraft. – I know just the guy. He thinks he was an ace in the war. He’s got a steel plate in his head. Mh, he’s not all there, but he
    knows his way around a plane. – Can you get him? – I thought we solved
    that problem already boss. – No, we got a lot of ’em, but there’s a dame on this now. – Ah. (clinking) Hey boss, this is Ace,
    the guy I told you about. – So you can make an airplane crash? – [Ace] Can I make an airplane crash, what a question. – Moron, I’m not used to asking question. And having a person I’m speaking to make me sound stupid. – [Ace] Alright, sorry. – Let’s try this again. I need this plane to crash this weekend and I want it to look like an accident. Can you do that? – Yeah, I can do that. – Good, now we’re getting somewhere. Al’s coming out here, and I want this fucking mess cleaned up before he gets here, or he’ll send Nitty, with
    some Chicago thunder, and we’ll be lucky if all
    he does is kneecap us all. – Who is Al? And what the fuck is a nitty? – Capone, you idiot. And I guarantee you, you
    do not want to meet Nitty. Damn, I got to be the
    one to pull your head. – [Don] Kitt. – Hey, Don. My gosh, it’s so nice to see you out. – Mh. It’s good to be out of that damn hospital. – [Kitt] You gonna fly with me? – No, my arm isn’t really
    feeling all that good. Besides, it’s your promotion and I really should stay
    around with the old gent, make sure he doesn’t run into anything. – [Kitt] Alright. I’ll see you when I get back. – Bye, have fun. (whirring) Don, Don, there she is. – Sure can fly. – [Vic] What’s this? – Looks like a bolt in the safety wire. – Hey kid. – Yeah? – Where’d you get this? – That man over there
    told me to give it to you. – [Vic] What man? – That man. (dramatic music) (whirring) (exploding) (soft music) – Annie, Annie, Annie. – Oh I hate you Vic Hansen. (rapid breathing) – What proof do you have that it was Tiny? (slamming) What’s this? – It’s the nut in safety wire that hold the control cable on. – Little son of a bitch. I told you he was dangerous. I just didn’t think he’d
    go after your girlfriend. – Yeah, well. I was supposed to be on that plane. I don’t know how he
    knew it, but he knew it. – Look, I hope you’re not
    gonna do anything stupid. – I’ve been dreaming up this little surprise for that little midget ever since he shot us down,
    and those two G men too. It’s about time that little operation he’s got up in Mount Spokane goes up in smoke, if you know what I mean. – That still is like a little thorthop on the side of that mountain. Just how do you expect to get to it? – By air. Wouldn’t be a problem, would it? – No, it wouldn’t. No. I think I know just a little too much about what you do in your spare time Vic. – How is it that you got
    a plane for sale so soon? – Well I sell things. – Things? – Yeah, things. You got something you want sold, I can find a buyer for you. Why just last week I was going on down to–
    – Alright, alright, I’ve already heard your line of BS. How much do you want for the plane? – You’re not one to fly it
    before you buy it, are you? – Maybe. – Oh, I can’t watch. – Well then close your eyes then. I’m gonna take it for a
    little spin around the patch. Don’t you worry Gabby, I’m
    not gonna crash your plane. – Just don’t do any of those
    there hoopty doos, okay? Oh did I tell you, this one’s got one of those
    newfangled radidioes in it. – You mean radio? – That’s what I said. You must have had trouble in school, huh? (thrilling music) – Go prop me up. (whirring) – Hey boys. – Hey Nick. – We need to figure out how to mount a machine gun on the plane. – I guess the question is where you gon’ get a fucking machine gun? – Well, those national
    guard boys next door, they just got a brand new one, and maybe, just maybe, we got
    the old one collecting dust. Besides, a little bit of rum might just cloud their judgment enough to make anything seem logical. – What are we still doing
    standing around here? Let’s go visit the neighbors. – Get in the car. – I ain’t riding in the stolen car. – Ah, it’s not stolen, it’s borrowed. – I ain’t riding in a borrowed car. – We’re gonna put it back. – Alright well then, well then just tell us how
    do we mount it on the plane? Where can we mount on the plane? – Actually you can put
    it on top of the wing. You can stand in the
    seat, shoot it from there, like you used to do. – Yeah, just like old times. You fly, I’ll shoot. – Hell no, this is your
    harebrained idea, not mine. – I’ll do it. I’ll fly the damn plane. – [Vic] No, you can’t fly, you won’t be able to see how close we are. – Just tell me when to
    pull up on the radio. We need to serve up some payback. – You know, that just might work. – Well it’s not gon’ be that easy. – Sure it is. – No, it ain’t. (whirring) Nick said to put the gun on the wing. – [Don] On top of the wing. – [Vic] On top of the wing. – [Don] How are you gonna reach
    the gun on top of the wing with that windshield there? – I didn’t think about that. Hell, we’re just gonna
    have to take it out. – [Don] Alright. (whirring) – [Tiny] Fuck it’s those rumrunners. – Okay, bring us around. – [Tiny] The fuck is that. Coming ’round again. Come on boys. – [Vic] Little closer. Almost there. (guns firing) (machine gun firing) Oh shit. (guns firing) Little closer. – [Don] Is that close enough? – Yeah, right there. (firing) – Get that fire out.
    – Come around again boy. (groaning) (gun cocking) (firing) (exploding) – [Tiny] Fuck! Oh fuck, oh fuck, oh fuck. (exploding) (thrilling music) (whirring) – You check the water and the oil, oh and don’t forget
    about the windshield sir. – Get ’em? – I fear the still has been destroyed. – Whatever will we do? – I’d get the hell out of here. And in a hurry. You can see the fire from town. – Yeah, I know. We got at least three or
    four of them, if not more. – Well you’re gonna have
    to change your identity. ‘Cause them feds and them Chicago boys gonna be looking all over hell
    and Washington for you guys. – Tell them boys we said thanks. – [Nick] Where you going? I don’t know, let’s see. Heads, Kentucky. Tails, Tennessee. (whirring) (whirring) (guitar music) (humming) ♫ All those years I drank ’em down ♫ All those years wild and free ♫ Then the revenue would come ♫ And shut it all down ♫ Falstead done got the best of me ♫ Now my hands is shaking ♫ My lid is aching ♫ Snakes are crawling over me ♫ My hands are shaking ♫ My heart is aching ♫ Snakes are crawling over me ♫ My hands are shaking ♫ My liver quaking ♫ Snakes are crawling over me ♫ My hands are shaking ♫ My lid is aching ♫ Snakes are crawling over me ♫ Get me a drink ♫ I can’t get clean ♫ No more booze ♫ I’m gonna get mean oh lord ♫ Get me a drink ♫ I can’t get clean ♫ One more night of gasoline ♫ Give me a drink ♫ I can’t get clean ♫ Falstead is killing me ♫ Give me a drink ♫ I can’t get clean ♫ One more night ♫ No more walking the street – [Singer] Somebody
    get me a goddamn drink.

    Articles

    Cat® Compact Track Loader D3 Series | Overview

    April 9, 2020


    Today I’m pleased to introduce you to
    the D3 series of Cat skid steer and compact track loaders. These wheeled and
    rubber track models provide new levels of comfort reliability and productivity
    that were inspired by you our customers. Let’s take a closer look. One of the
    first things you’ll notice is the changes in appearance to the outside of
    the machine. You’ve got the Cat logo located on the
    side of the machine along with the model number and the series number here on the
    left arm as well as some of the feature identifiers here on the left arm. This
    change in styling gives the machines a fresh new appearance. A couple of things
    we want to point out around the front of the machine here before we enter the cab
    which are a direct result of customer input and feedback. First would be the
    step here, wider openings that allow for great material flow through here
    anything that happens to be spilled from the bucket no longer as material buildup
    in this area an issue. Next would be a bolt on grab handle. Grab handle that if
    you happen to damage it in the course of the work that you’re doing is
    easily replaceable so that you can safely enter and exit the machine.
    Speaking of entering and exiting the machine cab door opening. Much wider than
    our previous models makes entering and exiting machine much much easier. Now
    that we have the cab first thing we want to do is put on our seat belt. You’ll
    notice that it’s a high vis orange which makes it much easier to see from outside
    the cab whether or not the operator has a seat belt on. Next you’ll notice the
    additional comfort provided in the cab. An additional three inches of space
    between these joystick pods allow the operator to be more comfortable not only
    in the knee room area but also in the foot positions that you can now place
    your feet for those long days on the job. I want to move the controls to a
    position that’s more comfortable for me as an operator. Speaking of controls there have been some improvements to the controls as well. On the left joystick there’s now
    a yellow button with a snail symbol on the face of the button that is the same
    symbol that you would see on the advanced display monitor when that
    function is activated. So when Creep control is activated you will see the
    same symbol snail here on the display that you see on the face of the button.
    In addition there’s now an icon on the display that indicates when you were in
    the float functionality. So if you’re using the float to clean up around the
    jobsite you will now know that. That’s just another way we’re
    communicating more information and making it more intuitive for you to use
    our machines on the jobsite. Cat skid steers and compact track loaders
    have always featured innovative technology. The dual direction
    self-leveling system is an example of that. Introduced in our previous series
    models we continue to offer the self leveling functionality which works in
    both the raise and lower direction on all our D3 models. Another example of
    technology is the return to dig and work tool positioner features which allow an
    operator to automate repetitive functions when digging and loading or
    operating an attachment where a specific angle is desired. These three features
    now have been bundled together so if your machine is equipped with the dual
    self leveling function you now can take advantage of the return to dig and work
    tool positioner features as well. Speaking of technology there’s some very
    exciting new technology that’s only available on the D3 skid steer and
    compact track loaders. When the machine recognizes that a smart tool is attached
    the joystick controls change to match the attachment functions. For instance
    when the smart backhoe is attached the joystick controls now operate the swing,
    boom, stick and bucket functions. This means there is no need for the door to
    be removed in order to operate the backhoe attachment and the operator can
    remain in the comfort of the fully sealed and pressurized cab. With the click
    of a button it is easy to switch from the backhoe mode back into the skid
    steer mode in order to travel or reposition the machine. Another smart
    tool example is the smart dozer blade attachment. When connected the joysticks
    convert to the dozer control pattern meaning the right-hand joystick controls
    all the blade functions. The smart tool technology is exciting and we will
    continually be adding attachments to our portfolio in order to expand your
    capabilities. We’ve also fine-tuned our torsion axle suspension undercarriage so
    now you can grade, truck load or handle materials with even more confidence. And
    if you load and carry as part of your regular application we’ve now added two
    speed travel to even our smallest compact track loaders.
    Now all D3 compact track loaders come standard with two speed travel for
    increased productivity no matter where you need to go. Last but certainly not
    least is an improved fuel filtration system. It’s now even lower in
    maintenance as an inline fuel filter is no longer required which means
    only one filter to change. The high-capacity canister style filter
    continues to offer a visual and electronic method of identifying any
    water that may have been separated from the fuel. The fuel lift pump is also an
    improved design as it’s now brushless for even greater efficiency and improved
    long-term reliability. I’d like to thank you for taking time to learn about the
    D3 skid steer and compact track loader machines. For more information visit your
    local cat dealer you can also check out our Instagram and Facebook pages as well
    as visiting our YouTube channel.

    Makurazaki Station, Train just arrived at Final Stop of Ibusuki-Makurazaki Line, Kagoshima
    Articles, Blog

    Makurazaki Station, Train just arrived at Final Stop of Ibusuki-Makurazaki Line, Kagoshima

    April 9, 2020


    MAKURAZAKI Station Lucky! The train has just arrived! This station is the final stop of the IBUSUKI-MAKURAZAKI Line in Japan. This line is the most southern in Japan Many people who like train come here. This station has no staff. This station building was donated by citizens of Makurazaki City. Because of its unique appearance, this building has received a prize. This board says “Welcome to Makurazaki” Train has 2 compartments. City views of Makurazaki City This fish statue is Botani, which is the main production of Makurazaki City.

    CAHSR Animation: San Joaquin Viaduct
    Articles, Blog

    CAHSR Animation: San Joaquin Viaduct

    April 8, 2020


    California High-Speed Rail animation of the San Joaquin River Viaduct and Pergola in North Fresno. Shown is an aerial view of the proposed structures over the San Joaquin River and the structure referred to as the ‘Pergola’ which crosses over the adjacent UPRR railroad tracks. Shown are several aerial views flying along the corridor structures and the adjacent State Route 99, with several views of a high-speed train traveling over the structures and pergola.

    Articles

    Government urged to back Metro bailout

    April 8, 2020


    it is vital that we continue to offer a
    public transport network so that key workers can get around. But you will know,
    that almost unbelievably, we’re actively discouraging people from traveling on
    the system unless their journey is absolutely essential. As a result trains
    and buses are almost empty as people heed the warnings and stay inside. Fare
    income pays for around two-thirds of the cost of operating the Metro. Almost all
    this will be lost until we return to normal. But as we look ahead, there will
    be a major financial gap that we estimate to be about 10 million pounds
    between now and July, and more, it will grow as the area recovers. We are therefore
    asking the Government to assist us in the same way that it’s done to the
    national rail companies. The government really does need to take this issue
    seriously, if it wants to preserve vital local systems like the Metro, and tram
    systems in other UK cities. Public support from Council Leaders, and MPs in
    the region, who know the vital role that Metro plays, is very welcome as we make
    our own case to the Government for financial support. Nexus will need a cash
    injection, and while there’s no threat right now to services and jobs, we will
    be forced to make tough decisions in the longer term if we don’t get this
    financial support.

    Japan Hour: Road Trip On Daiyūzan Line (Part 2)
    Articles, Blog

    Japan Hour: Road Trip On Daiyūzan Line (Part 2)

    April 8, 2020


    Local lines. Trains travelling through
    the beautiful scenery of Japan that make us feel nostalgic. Season by season,
    we enquire local residents to find breathtaking scenery, delicious
    cuisine, and wonderful accommodations. It’s a journey to uncover recommendations
    only the locals know. All aboard to find the home in our heart. HOME IN OUR HEART This time, the journey takes place
    in Kanagawa Prefecture, on the Daiyuzan Line of Izuhakone Railway. -We’re here.
    -Yes, we’ve arrived. We could’ve walked here. It’s a short line that takes 20 minutes
    from the first station to the last. It’s spring in full bloom
    along the railway. This is incredible! It’s great weather for travelling. Our travellers find cheap
    and delicious seafood. All of this? Yes, 550 yen. I’m taken aback! Gourmet food with large portions
    popular among the locals. -What happiness.
    -There you go. This feels amazing. The water is gentle. Our duo gets excited about
    an outdoor activity with a great view. Even this rugged old man enjoys it. -Thank you very much.
    -Thank you. The two are guided by
    the kindness of local residents. We talked on the phone. -Yes, thank you.
    -What’s your name? -Hiroshi Tachi.
    -Hiroshi Tachi? Shimo Shimo! Shimo Shimo! That’s so cute. It almost makes me cry. -That one’s from earlier.
    -Mr Shimoda. It’s filled with wonderful encounters. -Thank you.
    -Thank you very much. Yay, yay, yay. Let’s get started. All aboard
    our journey of enquiry and discovery! -Here’s are the grills.
    -It’s hot, so be careful. -It looks good.
    -It looks great. Let’s eat. Grilled beef slowly marinated
    in home-made miso. -It’s quite thick.
    -Look at that. It’s beef. It’s quite… luxurious, isn’t it? It has a great flavour of miso. I love it. Grilled seasonal vegetables grown locally are served with yuzu and pepper paste. See? -Wow, amazing.
    -Isn’t it? It’s juicy. It’s sweet. -I love the flavour of asparagus.
    -Me too. Also, the yuzu flavour is very nice. -I enjoy it.
    -It’s the best. I love vegetables, after all. Seasonal vegetables. Here’s your pot rice with
    sakura shrimps and clams. You’re very strong. -This is mixed rice with chicken.
    -Great. Ta-da! Mixed pot rice. -This is it.
    -Nice. -I should mix it, right?
    -Sure. -The colour is nice.
    -I’ll mix it. Nice colours. Look how they sparkle. It looks great. It does look good. Careful. It’s hot. That’s the edible wild plants. The rice is amazing. I love the flavour. You do? I love this rice. -It’s so good.
    -Good? -It has the juice from chicken mixed in.
    -I see. -It must have a rich flavour.
    -Very good. They cook rice with soup stock made with
    locally produced dried bonito flakes. Here’s the pot rice with sakura shrimps
    and clams. Let’s see. Look how many sakura shrimps they added. -The clams smell great.
    -That looks good. It’s quite a large dish! It has a lot of shrimps. This is proper… Sakura shrimps are in season right now. I’ll try it, then. I just made eye contact
    with this shrimp. Let’s eat. As soon as I put in my mouth,
    there’s a great flavour that spreads. The rice is incredible. ENTRY 6 The sixth entry, the flavourful
    pot rice and grills from Miyoshiya. -Thank you. It was delicious.
    -Thank you. -Thank you.
    -It was great. -It was all very good.
    -I loved the pot rice. -Thank you.
    -I’ll come back again. -Good job.
    -Good job, sir. -Thank you very much. See you later.
    -Have a safe trip. That was incredible. -It feels nice.
    -Yeah? We eat, take a bath, and sleep. You sleep like this? It’ll be nice to sleep in a place
    that’s so quiet. That’s true.
    It’s usually noisy where we live. We’re back at our home. -We’re back.
    -Hi there. -Are you asleep?
    -No. -It’s too early.
    -No, not yet. -Welcome back.
    -Thank you. I loved their pot rice. You did? I’m glad. -Great recommendation.
    -Thank you. I’m glad to help. -It’s an honour.
    -Thank you for everything. I would like to go see
    the hostess club next door with him. That would be fun. -You should.
    -You’re one year younger than me, right? You’re right. I’m 57 years old now. The year of the tiger. -Tiger?
    -Tiger. -I’m the year of the ox.
    -Really? You two should drink together
    until morning. -The one next door.
    -You guys should go. So you’re a tiger.
    In what month were you born? -September.
    -So I was one year ahead of you. Right, in school. The two quickly became best friends. -Thank you very much.
    -See you later. -Good night.
    -Good night. What a day we had. -I’ll sleep so well.
    -Thank you. It was a great trip. Very nice. On the journey on the Daiyuzan Line
    of Izuhakone Railway, our duo advanced to Sagaminumata Station
    and found six entries on the first day. Let’s hope that they’ll meet
    more wonderful people tomorrow. THE SECOND DAY -Good morning.
    -Why say it from up there? Good morning. I heard you whistling. Good morning. You look pretty as always. Thanks.
    You didn’t say that yesterday, though. I was tired yesterday. You were tired?
    You must’ve been exhausted. Hello, good morning. -Good morning.
    -Sorry, but I have a 10,000-yen bill. Can you change it to small bills? Sorry, we can’t. We’d accept it
    if it was 100,000 yen. What? Really? -What are you talking about? Good morning.
    -Good morning. Take a look at his tie. You have a tie on this morning.
    Last night, you wore a polo shirt. -It’s escalating.
    -I had to. -You had to?
    -You know. You two are staying at my hotel, so I thought I shouldn’t wear
    anything casual. -No worries. Yesterday was fine.
    -Really? It’s perfectly okay. -I’ll drive you guys now.
    -Yes, thank you. It was great.
    I was able to relax very well. It was a great hotel. Thank you. ENTRY 7 The seventh entry in the guidebook,
    Iwashita Ryokan, a hotel owned by a rugged old man
    who’s a fan of Girolamo. -The weather is very nice today.
    -A photo first thing in the morning. -Excuse us.
    -A photo in the morning. NARRATION: FUMITOSHI SANO The owner of the hotel will take
    the two to Sagaminumata Station. TIME LIMIT: 4:00PM This time, the time limit
    is four in the evening. They still have three more entries to find
    to achieve their goal. The weather is even nicer than yesterday. You’re right. The mountains look beautiful.
    Hakone mountains? Yes, Gairinzan and Myojingatake in Hakone. Gairinzan? I feel sad. Soon, we have to say goodbye. The time to say goodbye is approaching. -He always sees you in magazines.
    -That’s right. That’s incredible. Now I’ll collect more and more issues
    of LEON magazine. -Thanks to you.
    -That’s great. Mr Iwashita, you’re very fashionable.
    I can tell that you read the magazine. Very fashionable. -His manners too.
    -Sophisticated. That’s right. Thank you very much. We’ve arrived. They arrive at Sagaminumata Station. 17 MINUTES UNTIL THE 10:48AM TRAIN -Thank you very much.
    -Thank you very much. -Please give my regards to your wife.
    -Thank you very much. -Have a happy New Year.
    -Thank you very much. Merry Christmas. -We need to buy a pass again.
    -Yes, one for today. Let’s do that. -Good morning.
    -Sorry for the wait. One-day pass, please. -Two, please.
    -Two. Two tickets, please. It’ll be 1,080 yen. -Okay.
    -I’ll return this to you. It’s recycling. You return it?
    I’ve never seen anyone doing that. You don’t keep it as a souvenir?
    Thank you very much. I’ve never seen anyone return it. -All right.
    -All right, where should we go now? -Where are we now?
    -Sagaminumata. Okay, this way. Should we go to the next station? -Next station?
    -Iwahara. -Iwahara.
    -Yeah. -Let’s go to Iwahara.
    -Sure. There are five stations left,
    including the terminal. Their first destination today
    is Iwahara Station, the next station. Here it comes. Many people aboard? Here’s my train. -This way?
    -My train. My train. -Nice.
    -This feels nice. It’s very peaceful today. 10:48AM On the journey on Izuhakone Railway, the second day starts now! The Daiyuzan Line of Izuhakone Railway
    that runs through Kanagawa Prefecture is a short local line with 12 stations
    total and a distance of 9.6 kilometres. Their goal is to get recommendations
    from local residents and create an original travel guide
    with 10 entries. IWAHARA STATION We’ve arrived at Iwahara Station. -We’re here.
    -That was quick. So quick. -Cool.
    -Nice. So this is it. Hi there. -Hello.
    -Are you from here? -Are you from here?
    -Yes. Oh, really? Where are you going now? I went to Odawara to have a meal
    with my aunt. You went to Odawara for a meal? -I always see you on TV.
    -Thank you very much. What did you eat? Today? We had coffee and bread. So you went for a coffee.
    That must have been nice. How old are you? I’m 90 years old. You’re 90? So is my mother. You’re 90? You look younger than that. I’m young too. I’m 70 years old. -You’re 70? You both look young!
    -Terrific! -Anything interesting around here?
    -Right. -We just got off at this station.
    -There’s a shrine, but it’s not so great. There’s nothing interesting in this area. -The shrine is nice with cherry blossoms.
    -It can be anything. Any shops? -Any good food?
    -Please. -It can be a park.
    -Have you done this yet? No, not yet. Did you do this yet? You’re very honest. There isn’t anyone monitoring either. -They pay even if nobody is watching.
    -That’s great. -Are there any good sweets around here?
    -Yeah. -Maybe a cake shop?
    -Is there a cake shop here? -No.
    -It can be anything. -There’s a store over there.
    -A store? -Turn right over there.
    -Is it a supermarket? -It’s a 7-Eleven.
    -7-Eleven? There’s also a MaxValu supermarket. -Really?
    -It recently opened. It must make things easier for you.
    That’s convenient. I see. -Sorry I couldn’t be of much help.
    -Don’t worry about it. -Let’s walk around, then.
    -Yeah, let’s go this way. 1 HOUR, 48 MINUTES UNTIL THE 12:37PM TRAIN It feels like there are more people here
    compared to other stations. They look for people to enquire. There’s a signboard
    of a tatami shop there. -Where?
    -Look. -Yeah.
    -It says “tatami.” Should we go take a look? Our duo is curious about the tatami shop, so they’ll make a little detour. -Hello.
    -Hello. -Hello.
    -Excuse me. -Hello?
    -Are you busy? Sorry to bother you. -Is it okay if we film you?
    -Sure. He’s okay with it. I can’t believe this! You’re making tatami mats. I’ve never seen that before. -What?
    -What? -May we?
    -Go ahead. Are you the owner’s son? -Nice.
    -Yes, I am. How many generations? -The fourth generation? Impressive.
    -Awesome. -May we come in?
    -Sure. Let’s go look. -I wanted to see this.
    -I wanted to see tatami mats. I can’t believe this. Wow, this is impressive. -Nice.
    -This is so cool. It’s a tatami shop. -You’re the fourth generation?
    -Yes. -So it’s 100 years old?
    -No. How many years has it been? I’m not sure exactly how many years. But it’s been a very long time. How old are you now? -I’m 41 years old.
    -41? We’re the same age. Yeah! We’re the same age. -You were born in 1978?
    -Yes! Year of the horse. Awesome, and you’re the fourth generation. Shimo Shimo! Cool. Wow, what are you doing here? -We’re travelling along this line.
    -I see. We saw a sign that said “tatami mats.” We wanted to see it. You’re a craftsman. That’s cool. A craftsman. A bit rugged. Yes, a rugged craftsman. Cool. -How long does it take to make a mat?
    -Yeah. It doesn’t take much. About 30 minutes. -What?
    -30 minutes? It’s all done with machines now. -Oh, I see.
    -Yes, it’s all machines. If I did it by hand using these tools, -it’d take 1.5 to two hours.
    -Per mat? -Yes, if it’s all done by hand.
    -I see. Impressive. What is this called? It’s the edge of a tatami. -What?
    -It’s this part here. How many different patterns do you have? There are a lot. I always see tatami mats and think that
    they have cute edges. -Sometimes I do.
    -There are many. A lot of them. Samples? So cute. -These are adorable. Look.
    -Nice. -This one’s cute.
    -Yeah. Are these the latest ones? Yes, they are. These are very cute. I like that. I’d love to have tatami mats like these. Where can I buy these? -These…
    -You order them? I order them from a wholesale dealer. This one is lovely. The tatami culture should be valued more. Can I take a photo? A photo? You want to take a photo of this? It’d be really cool
    if I put them on my jeans. I see. -That’s a cool idea.
    -We have these too. He’s a fashion model after all.
    He has very unique ideas. We can chose the front side too? Within walking distance from here, is there anything you recommend? -Someplace you like.
    -Within walking distance? -Yes.
    -Walking distance… Walking distance… -Grill Toshio.
    -Grill Toshio? It’s a restaurant that is super retro. -Is it good?
    -Not sure if they’re open. Their food is amazing. Do you often go there? -Sometimes, with my family.
    -What’s good there? They are known for their cutlet curry. Cutlet curry. -That sounds nice.
    -The presentation is amazing. -It’s like this.
    -Wow, really? It’s called Grill Yoshio. Do you often go there? Yes, that’s why I look like this. I’ll bring my dad. Your dad? His father, who was taking
    a break at home, comes out. -Hi there.
    -This is Nora. Sorry to surprise you. -You’re so friendly. Thank you.
    -Thank you very much. -Thank you too.
    -Really. Not many famous people visit our town. I’m curious about Grill Yoshio.
    Let’s go see. It’s Grill Toshio. It’s Toshio. Sorry, Yoshio is my ex. Keep walking down that way. -Where?
    -Nice, Dad. That path. -Go down that street.
    -Down the street. -Thank you.
    -Really, thank you. -Thank you.
    -Thank you. -Thank you. Take care of yourself.
    -Let me see that. -Two rugged men.
    -Great. See you. -Thank you.
    -Bye. -Bye. Good luck.
    -Thank you very much. Thank you. They’re nice people. Very funny. They’ll now go to Grill Toshio. Is that it? Pork cutlet set menu. Pork cutlet set menu. Yeah, there it is. The restaurant looks cool. Cool, it’s retro. This is going to be good. Hi there. Hello. Hello. We have a camera crew that’s filming us. May we film your restaurant? Can they film us eating food? They said it’s okay. That guy must be Toshio. -It must be.
    -It’s all good. It’s a nice restaurant. -It’s so clean and sparkly.
    -Let’s go. Shall we go in? Sorry to bother you. Sorry. Thank you for having us. -Sorry to show up so suddenly.
    -Thank you. Cutlet curry. Such a big portion. Yeah, that looks like a lot of food. Maybe I’ll try one. What should I get? Our hamburger steaks are very popular. Hamburger steaks? -I’ll get this pork cutlet hamburger set.
    -Sure. Please. Grill Toshio opened 47 years ago. The reputation of their traditional
    home-made dishes, spread by word of mouth. Now, not only the locals but people from
    out of prefecture come to eat their food. Here’s
    your pork cutlet hamburger steak set menu. -Nice.
    -That’s me. Pork cutlet hamburger steak. -Wow, look at that.
    -Awesome. Here’s the sauce for your hamburger steak. It’s tender. Look how easily the chopsticks go in. It’s very old-fashioned. It makes me feel nostalgic. And… -Look!
    -Here’s the cutlet curry. My goodness! Whoa, look at that. Unbelievable. My gosh. Seriously! Our duo gets off the train
    at Iwahara Station. They visit the restaurant recommended
    earlier that serves Western-style food. -Here’s the cutlet curry.
    -My goodness! Wow, look at that. This is crazy. My gosh. Seriously! Oh, dear. For their popular cutlet curry,
    400 grammes of rice is served. On freshly deep-fried cutlet, they pour lots of curry,
    which they spent three days cooking. There’s the cutlet. What happiness. There you go. He’s happy. I love the curry flavour… -mixed with the crunchy breading.
    -Yeah, the breading. It’s amazing. In the kitchen, there is a man
    working hard, cooking all by himself. Could this be Toshio? -It’s very good.
    -Very good. Oh, yeah? Thank you. -Are you Yoshio?
    -Sorry? -Are you Yoshio?
    -I’m Toshio. -You’re Toshio?
    -Yes. -You’re Toshio.
    -Yes, I am. -Can you finish that?
    -I’ll try my best. -The food is amazing.
    -Good luck finishing it. Thank you very much. Are you doing okay with these prices? Yes, we manage. -Yeah?
    -It’s me and my daughter. I see, so it’s you and your daughter
    who work here. I can’t believe these generous prices
    when there’s this much food. ENTRY 8 The eighth entry in the guidebook,
    Grill Toshio, with their huge cutlet curry which has a 47-year-long history. Thank you for the food. -Thank you.
    -Thank you. -Sorry to bother you during busy hours.
    -Come again. Thank you. I loved the food. Thank you very much. -That was great, wasn’t it?
    -Yeah. -Yes, it was.
    -Incredible. You can tell by this -that people wait in line.
    -You’re right. They must be very busy during lunch hours. Their food is amazing,
    so that makes sense. Yeah, if people spread the word. What time is it? They’re back at Iwahara Station. What’s next? -Next?
    -Stop at each station? -Where are we now?
    -We’re at Iwahara now. Maybe we can skip one station? And go to Wadagahara? -The next one might be close from here.
    -True. So we should skip
    to the station that’s after that. There are only four stations left. They skip the next station
    and go to Wadagahara Station. Will they be all right? Look. -That’s our train.
    -Here it is. All right. 12:37PM After a while… Look at those clouds. Impressive. Look, it’s Mount Fuji! So pretty! Mount Fuji! It’s very pretty. It looks amazing! I’ve never seen Mount Fuji
    from a train before. If you’re lucky, you get
    to see Mount Fuji like this. After a five-minute ride,
    the train arrives at Wadagahara Station. WADAGAHARA STATION -We’re here.
    -Good. 12:42PM It’s slightly a larger station. Yes, it is. Okay, right now… It’s 12:43pm. We can take the next train
    at 1:18pm or 1:30pm? -Around then.
    -Sure. What’s going on? There’s a square
    right in front of the station. -Yeah.
    -We didn’t have that before. Right, we didn’t have that until now. -This looks nice.
    -There’s a coffee shop. Kintaro Shokudo. Cool. -That’s a convenience store.
    -Yeah. What a nice coffee shop. -Hello.
    -Hi there. -Nice.
    -Hi. -Hello.
    -Hi. -Hello, hello.
    -Great. I can’t believe this. Is there anything
    within walking distance from here that you recommend we visit? Recommendations around this area? -Kohakudo.
    -Kohakudo? It’s behind the train track. Let’s go take a look. They sell aroma oils -and incense sticks.
    -Really? -Can we buy souvenirs there?
    -Yes. Yeah! -Thank you.
    -Let’s go look. Usually, aroma oils and incense sticks
    are not sold together. It’s a very nice store. Great. Let’s go see it. Let’s go. -Thank you very much.
    -Thank you very much. Thank you. We’ll be back. There’s a white building on the right. It’s open. I see cars parked. -Thank you.
    -Thank you. Thank you very much. I’m excited to look for some souvenirs. -I want to buy something.
    -That’d be nice. Right around the corner… I see something very pretty. It’s in an amber colour. Yeah. -See?
    -Yes. Excuse me. -It smells great.
    -Can we film your store for a TV show? -For us…
    -We’re with a TV crew. We’re on a journey. -They said okay.
    -It’s nice. It’s a very nice place. Please come in. It smells great.
    I’ve never been to a store like this. This is the store manager. -She’s pretty.
    -Not at all. Thank you for having us. Our duo gets off the train
    at Wadagahara Station and visits a stylish store where
    incense sticks and aroma oils are sold. Let’s look inside. -The manager is pretty.
    -Not at all. Thank you for having us. Is this a relatively new store? We opened last April. -Last April?
    -Yes. And before that? -Nothing.
    -Nothing? This building was newly built. At first, the local people here
    didn’t feel comfortable coming in. And not many people
    came into the store at first. So, last summer, I also sold some vegetables and fruits outside of the store
    to make it easier for them to come in. You lured them with food. Exactly. This April will mark
    Kohakudo’s first anniversary. The manager of the store
    is full of great ideas. When she found out
    that the elderly in the area had to travel far to get incense sticks, she decided to open this store. She sells not only incense sticks
    to be lit for home altars but sells incense and aroma oils as well. There are about 800 products
    that have different scents. This one has a smell of coffee. -That’s right.
    -You love coffee. -Impressive.
    -I just had a customer who bought these. Her late parents loved coffee,
    so she got these to offer to them. It was just this morning. -I had no idea there are this many.
    -Yes, there are. Amazing. Let’s find one with a nice scent. -Lily and rose.
    -Lily and rose. -Violet.
    -Violet. I’ll take this. -And this stand. It’s lovely.
    -Great. Nora buys incense with a floral scent
    and an incense stand. This one has a citrus scent.
    It’s refreshing. I smell yuzu. Thank you very much. I’ll take this. This is an aroma oil with a yuzu scent. -I’ll take this.
    -Thank you very much. That one. She also buys some scented cards. Is this new? Yes, it’s new. It was out of stock for a long time,
    and I couldn’t get them. I finally got one here. -How much is this?
    -25,000 yen. It’s very nice. It’s pretty. After much contemplating,
    Girolamo decides to buy this. -I wasn’t planning on buying anything.
    -I know. -I was forced to buy.
    -Not really. You kept buying more and more stuff. Pay in a lump sum? No, can I pay in 10 instalments?
    Just kidding. ENTRY 9 The ninth entry in the guidebook,
    Kohakudo, with various scented products. -Thank you very much.
    -Thank you very much. That was great. We’ve got eight… no, nine entries. -We need one more.
    -One more. They’re back at Wadagahara Station. Where will they go next? 7 MINUTES UNTIL THE TRAIN AT 2:06PM -Let’s go to Daiyuzan.
    -Daiyuzan. Now that they’re happy with the souvenirs
    they bought, they head to Daiyuzan, which is the terminal station. This is the last time they’re taking
    the Daiyuzan Line on this journey. This is the last time we’ll see this. It’s the last time we take the train. -Should we sit here?
    -Where? That way? 2:06PM The scenery outside of the train windows
    will be remembered forever. It’s breathtakingly beautiful. We’re arriving at Daiyuzan, the terminal. Here it is, the terminal. Please make sure to take
    all of your belongings. Great. Daiyuzan Station, the terminal. DAIYUZAN STATION Slowly, the train arrives at Daiyuzan Station,
    the last station of this journey. We made it to our goal, Giro! -Yes!
    -We made it to the goal! We did it! -Cool.
    -This is nice. The station looks different. -Look.
    -It feels more lively. What’s that? -Hello.
    -This is the last time we’re using this. -Thank you.
    -Thank you. -You can pass.
    -Oh, yeah. We can just go. -What’s in front of the station?
    -It’s huge. -Look, Giro!
    -Look at that! Look. It’s Kintaro. Kintaro is from the Ashigara Mountains. KINTARO’S HOMETOWN,
    THE ASHIGARA MOUNTAINS Kintaro is a folk tale character
    that is featured in a nursery rhyme. The Ashigara Mountains
    are also mentioned in the rhyme. It’s a collective term that refers to
    the area near the Kintoki Mountains, including Hakone Gairinzan
    and the Ashigara Touge. It’s also Kintaro’s hometown. This is the waterfall where Kintaro
    supposedly took a bath as a baby. The folk hero supposedly used these rocks
    to do juggling with bears. In this area, there are many places
    related to the legend of Kintaro. I wonder if there are any locals here. I see a taxi driver. We already asked a taxi driver.
    We asked Mr Shimoda. Our duo enquire a flower shop
    in front of the station. -Hi there.
    -Welcome. We’ve been travelling. Are there any places nearby
    that you recommend we visit? -We’re asking people around.
    -I see. -Doryo.
    -Doryo? Do you know Saijoji? It’s a temple. -A temple.
    -We have a temple and a shrine. And souvenir shops? Yes, I think so. You’ll need to take a bus from here. It’ll be about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes. It’s a bit up high. -We go up the mountain?
    -Yes. Would you like to come with us? I have an errand to run right now. An errand. Do you often go there? I do. I recently visited there. It’s a wonderful place. -Is it?
    -Yes. We should go, then. It’s a very unique place. -It’s Sajodera?
    -Saijoji. -Saijoji.
    -Saijoji. Also known as Doryo. -Thank you.
    -Thank you. Sorry I can’t go with you. No problem. Thank you. -Sorry.
    -It’s fine. Thank you. Our duo takes a bus
    to a temple called Saijoji. Excuse me. We’re filming a travel show now. Is it okay to film inside the bus? -Sure, no problem.
    -Thank you. There’s something Nora has been meaning
    to ask Girolamo for the past two days. It’s Kintaro’s mountain. What do you have in your bag? -Inside?
    -Yeah. It could’ve been a small bag like this. I saw that and thought so too. Maybe I’m more feminine than girls? What do you mean? -This.
    -What’s that? Our duo arrives at Daiyuzan Station,
    the terminal. They now take a bus to Doryoson. On the bus… 1 HOUR, 24 MINUTES
    UNTIL THE 4:00PM TIME LIMIT What do you have in your bag? -Inside?
    -Yeah. It could’ve been a small bag like this. I saw that and thought so too. Maybe I’m more feminine than girls? What do you mean? -This.
    -What’s that? It’s long. It’s an iPhone charger, isn’t it? Why would you need such a long one? It’s very useful. What else? -What else?
    -We’re looking through your bag. This is it. An iPad. An iPad. I watch TV on this. There was a football
    game last night, so I watched it. -That’s impressive.
    -Also… This is aftershave lotion. I see, for shaving. You don’t need to carry this every day. You can use this if you want. -Hand cream.
    -Hand cream. You’re very girly, Giro. I love this smell. Good smell. -Yeah, I like it.
    -Great. Impressive, as I expected. -Italian men are well groomed.
    -Not really. This is a payslip from my agency. A payslip? I want to see that. It’s not bad. And many other things. Why would you go
    on a trip with your payslip? -I need to file tax returns.
    -I see. What’s this? -That is…
    -A cushion? -Cushion.
    -Something was on it? -Something was on it.
    -Yes. It should be inside here somewhere. 2:38PM You have so many things.
    I wonder what was on this. -I also bring music when I travel.
    -Music, sure. -Bluetooth.
    -It’s so heavy. It’s really heavy. We’re going up the mountain. Yes, we’ll go up a bit. We’re going up quite a lot. The bus advances farther into the woods. We’re here. Amazing. We’ve arrived. We’re here. Look at that. Thank you very much. Incredible. It’s a bit chilly. Yeah. Great. There’s a bridge. Giro and a bridge. -Bridge.
    -Giro and a bridge. PHOTO TAKEN BY NORA HIRANO -Great.
    -Thank you. Giro and a bridge. All right. These steps look nice. I love this. Very nice. It’s beautiful. -It’s very picturesque.
    -It is. Anywhere you look. Look at that bridge. -Nice.
    -Pretty. It has a great atmosphere. The gods are calling me. -Stand over there, Giro.
    -Sorry. Nice. Nora can’t resist taking photos. It’s a fusion of Japan and Europe. Even if they don’t give us
    permission to film, -it’s still worth coming here.
    -You’re right. 57 MINUTES UNTIL THE 4:00PM TIME LIMIT Don’t forget that you’ve yet to reach
    the goal of finding 10 entries. It’s quite a large temple. Will they let us film here? Ready, set… Hurry up and get here. -Hurry, you’re slow.
    -Don’t stand there. Hurry up and get here. Earlier, we were talking to the lady
    at the flower shop. That lady apparently called city hall
    for us. She had asked someone to be here
    when we visit, and he’s here. The lady felt bad
    that she couldn’t come with our duo, so she called someone she knew
    from the Commerce and Industry Division. -Mr Nakazawa.
    -I’m Nakazawa from city hall. -Mr Nakazawa.
    -Yes. -The lady from the flower shop called you.
    -Yes. She told me to get here right away,
    so I did. -You have a nice personality.
    -Thank you. -This way.
    -This place is massive. Yes, it is. It’s equivalent to 27 Tokyo Domes. 27 Tokyo Domes? Seriously? The temple was built about 610 years ago,
    during the Muromachi period. It was built around the same year
    as Kinkakuji in Kyoto. -The same year.
    -Kyoto. About 600 years ago, Saijoji was supposedly built by a monk named Emyo Ryoan. It’s a renowned temple with
    about 4,000 schools across Japan. A RENOWNED TEMPLE WITH
    ABOUT 4,000 SCHOOLS ACROSS JAPAN Here it is. -It’s the main temple.
    -Okay. Please come up. Excuse me. Incredible. THE MAIN TEMPLE This structure is called a canopy. It’s the biggest one in Japan. -The biggest in Japan.
    -I believe! I’ve never seen anything this big either. A canopy. The three stand in line and pray. At this temple,
    there’s something even bigger. -What is it?
    -It’s the biggest in the world. -I’ll show you next.
    -You’re good. You’re a great speaker. -Stay tuned!
    -Exactly. We’ll have a commercial break here. This way. He’s so funny. The temple is also known
    as a temple of tengu. That’s right. We saw a tengu. When a Buddhist priest died,
    one of his monks named Doryo said that he did everything he could
    for the temple. He said that he’d transform into a tengu so he can watch over this temple. He became a tengu
    and disappeared into the mountain. So we have a tengu watching over us. So that’s what it was. Doryo is believed
    to have been a disciple monk who contributed significantly
    to the establishment of the temple. The monk actually existed, and he is believed to have transformed
    into a tengu when the priest died. It is said that
    he is still watching over the temple. Because of this monk named Doryo, Saijoji is also known as Doryo-san. The temple is very much loved
    by the people. I think I saw something. -You saw it?
    -I think so. Hey! -Here it is.
    -Here. -They’re geta sandals.
    -Look at that. There are so many geta sandals. Why are they here? These are geta sandals that are worn by
    the tengu I mentioned earlier. So the believers of the tengu
    bring these here and donate them to the temple. The world’s biggest thing
    that I mentioned earlier is actually this. -It’s huge.
    -It’s huge. It’s gigantic! Wow, unbelievable. -These weigh four tonnes.
    -Four tonnes? Geta? Four tonnes? You know, geta sandals always come
    as a pair of two. So they’re believed to bring luck in love
    or to improve one’s marriage. So that’s what it was. It’s geta. -I see.
    -Walk through and get lucky in love. Why don’t we walk through together? -Let’s go. From where?
    -Lucky love… From the centre. They walk through to pray
    for more happiness in their lives. Happiness, please come my way. -Do I turn left?
    -All the way to the left. -Left?
    -Not there. That way. Yes. This way? Go into the middle part. -Okay.
    -And come out through the centre. -Right?
    -That’s all. Watch your head. I tried to circle many times. All right. We’ll be happy. Now I’ll take you two
    to the most spiritual spot of this temple. Let’s go! I’m so intrigued. With Mr Nakazawa from city hall,
    our duo visits Doryoson. I’ll take you two
    to the most spiritual spot of this temple. Let’s go. I’m so intrigued. So many spiritual sites. -That’s true.
    -Yeah. Mr Nakazawa guides the two farther. -Look at that.
    -Nice. It’s the oldest tree here at the temple. It’s about 500 to 600 years old. -600 years?
    -Back when the temple was built. Amazing. In the spring, when the tree absorbs
    water, you can hear the water running up. The water needs to be lifted
    up to the top. That’s how much vitality this tree has. You’ll absorb energy from the tree
    when you hug it. So this is the spiritual spot? There are three old trees here,
    so there’s a lot of energy here. Incredible. -Three brothers.
    -That’s right. Please try touching the tree. -I feel a lot of energy from these trees.
    -Yeah, me too. ENTRY 10 The 10th entry in the guidebook,
    Doryoson and its spiritual energy. They successfully achieved their goal. -Thank you.
    -Thank you. Please come again. I feel happy now. Me too. 4:00PM -Full of energy.
    -Exactly. Don’t do it too much, or you’ll explode. Boom! You’re so popular. No matter where you go,
    the elderly and kids recognise you. -You should be happy about it.
    -Yes. It’s all thanks to your fans. Yes, it’s all thanks to everyone we met that’s made this journey a great success. -That’s not an overstatement.
    -Right. -It’s fun to travel not having made plans.
    -True. -Busy people usually make plans.
    -You’re right. If you have time, make no plans.
    Pleasant surprises await you. -You might meet someone.
    -That’s right. For every unique encounter,
    there is a special place to visit. This would not have been the same
    if it weren’t for you all. This local line
    was a heart-warming journey. Thank you, everyone, so very much!

    Articles

    Crossrail Explained In 2 Minutes

    April 8, 2020


    Crossrail is a new railway coming to
    London that will run from one side to the other starting and finishing outside of the
    Greater London area but also in new tunnels underground central London It starts out in the west at Reading and
    comes along existing tracks to Paddington with a branch coming up from
    Heathrow as well which is where it then goes 30 meters underground into the new
    tunnels one branch heads southeast coming up to the surface after Canary Wharf but with two short tunnel sections again before terminating at Abbey Wood
    the branch that runs northeast comes into the open just before Stratford and runs over the
    line that is County known as TfL Rail, terminating at Sheffield There are nine brand new stations being
    built mainly in the central area with all other existing stations on the line
    either being upgraded or rebuilt When the service is fully running there
    will be 24 trains per hour in the peak through the central section with 12 each
    on the two eastern branches, 14 of those trains will terminate the Pennington and out of
    the other 10, 4 will go to Heathrow 6 will go to West Drayton , 4 to Maidenhead and 2 will terminate at Reading To run the service 65 brand new trains are being built capable of carrying one and a half thousand passengers each and they’re
    going to be really long Compared to six-car trains on the tubes Northern and Piccadilly lines and even longer eight car trains on the tubes Victoria
    and Central lines Crossrail trains are going to be even longer at two hundred
    and five meters With such long trains, it’s going to be more important than ever to be at the right end here’s where the platforms are going to
    be at the new Tottenham Court Road station the western entrance and exit will be a
    third of the way down the road towards Oxford Circus tube at Farrington
    Crossrail the eastern end of the station will connect up with Barbican tube
    station such is the length of the platforms on the ground and for Liverpool Street Crossrail station the western end reaches is all the way to
    Moorgate and you’ll be able to enter Moorgate tube station and walk the
    length of the Crossrail platforms and get to liverpool street tube station but
    Crossrail isn’t going to open up all at once it’s scheduled to open in stages. Liverpool Street to Shenfield, currently branded as TfL Rail will be rebranded and become
    Crossrail in May 2017 Crossrail will then take over Heathrow
    services the Paddington in May 2018 It won’t be until December 2018 that the
    new tunnels under London open to the public and services start between
    Paddington and Abbey Wood In May 2019, trains from Sheffield well then no longer go to Liverpool
    Street but run into central London in the new
    underground tunnels. The last part – full services out to Reading – will then commence in December 2019 The colour for Crossrail is purple which is how it will appear on the tube map but with more over ground services and new tube
    extensions coming by the time the Crossrail finally fully opens in 2019
    the tube map may yet evolve into a brand new design

    Well There’s Your Problem | Episode 17: The Atmospheric Railway
    Articles, Blog

    Well There’s Your Problem | Episode 17: The Atmospheric Railway

    April 8, 2020


    JUSTIN: Need to move this over so I can see
    that yes, I am recording. Okay. In that case, I’m going to start the podcast. ALICE: Mm. And explain why we’re looking at this tube. JUSTIN: Yes. So, hello and welcome to ‘Well There’s Your
    Problem,’ a podcast about engineering disasters with slides. Potentially sponsored by the Bloomberg Foundation,
    we don’t know yet. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: He still hasn’t contributed to the Patreon. LIAM: Give us your fuckin’ money, Mike! ALICE: Yeah. Fingers crossed. JUSTIN: Give us your money. We’ll say nice things about you if you give
    us your money. [laughter]
    ALICE: The only way to deal with us Berniebros is just to, just pay us the money. Pay us the money. JUSTIN: Gotta buy us off. Yeah. So, I’m Justin Roczniak, I’m the person who’s
    talking right now, my pronouns are ‘he’ and ‘him’, that’s me. ALICE: I am Alice Caldwell-Kelly, my pronouns
    are ‘she’ and ‘her’, I’m also on a podcast called Trashfuture, it’s very good, you should
    listen to that, and I’m sorry I have been so slow at captioning the previous episodes
    on YouTube, it’s a lot of work and the APT one is two hours long. LIAM: [groans like he’s been shot]
    ALICE: Yeah. I just… I’ll get it done, eventually, inshallah. JUSTIN: If we had that Bloomberg money, we
    could hire someone to do it quicker. ALICE: Yeah! We could get an intern! We should get an intern, to do that. LIAM: Give us your money, Mike! JUSTIN: Oh, that’s a good idea. LIAM: Give us your money, Mike. [laughter]
    LIAM: Last, I am Liam Anderson, I am @oldmananders0n on Twitter, my pronouns are ‘he/him’, and
    I am back from my girls’ weekend – Jesus Christ – and I am ready to talk about engineering
    failures. Uh, on a personal note, I would like to wish
    Megan Burke a happy birthday, and also that no-one can ever ask me for shit again. I’m retired. [laughter]
    ALICE: You fulfilled all of your, like, feudal obligations in Maryland. LIAM: Yes. Yes. Baltimore is a great city, absolutely very
    near and dear to my heart, because, almost more than Philly, it’s just an entire trash
    heap come to life. I love it. ALICE: You could also, I suppose, say ‘go
    birds’ and mean the Ravens. LIAM: [immediately] No fuck the Ravens. Listen-
    [laughter] LIAM: York, Pennsylvania is 50 miles north
    of Baltimore, I had to deal with Ravens fans as a kid, I fucking hate Ravens fans, you
    can’t, I’m not gonna hear about Ray Lewis is actually a good guy, go to hell. [laughter]
    ALICE: You know I only said that just to irritate you, right? LIAM: Yeah, I know. I know what you’re doing. [laughter]
    LIAM: So, tell me about the tube. JUSTIN: We’re looking at a rather ugly looking
    cast iron pipe. LIAM: Uh, I think it’s pretty. JUSTIN: You think it’s pretty? ALICE: This was the thing that Grover like,
    sunk in to tap into the municipal sewer, right? [laughter]
    LIAM: Yeah. JUSTIN: …sure, why not. No, today we’re gonna talk about really a
    wide variety of things which all sort of fit into the concept of the atmospheric railway. And one thing I wanna note before we begin,
    as a disclaimer. So a lot of people, like, go in the comments
    and they accuse us of just cribbing from the Wikipedia page, right? ALICE: Fucking assholes! We don’t do that, I don’t bother to read the
    Wikipedia page. I just make this shit up as I go along! JUSTIN: Yeah, sometimes Wikipedia is a good
    place to start for research, um, but a lot of people said that about the Quebec Bridge
    episode and I was like, “Fuck you. Fuck you, you fucking-”
    [crosstalk of us calling you an asshole] JUSTIN: I spent a long time on that shit! ALICE: How dare you accuse me of doing research? I just do drinking, and I get Justin to do
    the research. LIAM: Yes. JUSTIN: Exactly. LIAM: Thank you, beast of burden. JUSTIN: This is called ‘division of labor’. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: One of the things about the atmospheric railway is that the best source of information
    on this subject really is the Wikipedia page. There’s not a lot of information online, you
    gotta look for rare books if you want to find- ALICE: Yeah, you’re not going to, like, dive
    into a bunch of leather-bound volumes, and pass a library use check like Call of Cthulhu. JUSTIN: Yeah, I have to like go into the restricted
    section of the library in Harry Potter to find more-
    LIAM: READ ANOTHER BOOK [laughter]
    ALICE: The only actual diagrams of atmospheric railways are in the Vatican Secret Archives
    for some reason? [laughter]
    LIAM: Right up there with how Pope Pius XII didn’t prevent the Holocaust, yeah. ALICE: Yeah. The real trick to getting into the Vatican
    Secret Archives is, the only security measure is a guy explaining to you that ‘secret’ just
    means ‘private’ rather than ‘secret’ in the modern sense, for an hour. And once you listen to that guy, you’re in. LIAM: Yeah, I can sit through that. I don’t care. I’m not doing anything. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: It sounds more pleasant than the Vatican Museum, that place is a trash heap. It’s just full of-
    [laughter] JUSTIN: There’s too many fuckin’ people in
    there. LIAM: There is, oh God, there is! Ughhh no. ALICE: I feel like this is a thing, like-
    JUSTIN: They funnel you into the Sistine Chapel at the end, and like, there’s so many fuckin’
    people in there, it’s like, you can’t appreciate anything. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: All I wanted to see, I just wanted to see The School of Athens. That was the only thing I wanted to see, it
    was right at the end, and I was like, “Wow, I suffered through all of that shit just so
    I could look at this one painting which I *kind of* like.” [laughter]
    ALICE: That’s the one with the philosophers talking and walking, right? JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: Like they use in memes for, like, smart
    conversations. LIAM: Yeah, but we have a School of Athens
    here in South Philly. JUSTIN: Yeah, there is a South Philly School
    of Athens. ALICE: I feel like this is a problem with
    all holy sites, though. LIAM: Yup. ALICE: Like, if you look at the Ganges, or,
    well, we talked about Mecca previously, it’s just, there’s too many people, it’s too crowded. LIAM: You know what’s nuts, though? I went on Birthright – sorry in advance. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Cancelled. LIAM: Yeah, so obviously the Western Wall
    is mobbed, and, y’know, there’s security everywhere, and everyone’s real mad at you for taking
    a picture on your cellphone, uh, because it’s sabbath and God’s pissed or whatever, even
    though it doesn’t say anywhere in the Torah that I can’t take a picture with my cellphone. [laughter]
    ALICE: [losing it] Where would it say that?! JUSTIN: It says you can’t push a button!
    [laughter] JUSTIN: Like, the ultra-orthodox figured this
    out, you can’t push buttons. ALICE: Yeah, you can’t do work. JUSTIN: That’s why they have that weird elevator
    with sabbath mode, yeah. LIAM: Oh, I love the elevator. ALICE: Yeah, it’s why they have the oven setting
    for when you, like, program it in advance, because you can set a machine to do work for
    you ahead of the sabbath, but not do work yourself on the sabbath, right? LIAM: ANYWAY. I went to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre,
    uh, to take pictures for my Catholic girlfriend – uh, suck it Mom – and it was not crowded
    at all! I walked, I breezed right in to the Church
    of the Holy Sepulchre, and walked around for like the twenty minutes I had, and no-one,
    y’know, yelled at me about taking a picture on my cellphone. ALICE: Well, what year was it – what time
    of year was it, though? LIAM: Summer. ALICE: Cause if you go at Easter… LIAM: Summer. ALICE: Mm. Well, but when in summer, because if it’s
    Easter, you’re going to have to push a bunch of Greek dudes out of the way with, like,
    your elbows. LIAM: Yeah, that’s what I do on a daily basis
    anyway. [laughter]
    LIAM: I’m just saying, give me your lame gyros and get the fuck out of my way. I’m trying to go to work. [laughter]
    LIAM: Now that I’ve been cancelled. Again. ALICE: Yeah. Offensive teams coordinator against the Greek
    diaspora. LIAM: Sorry folks. Cyprus is not yours. [laughter]
    ALICE: It’s part of ahl al-Islam, is why. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: We will have a future podcast that will focus on interfaith dialog, but… LIAM: Oh, *yes*. ALICE: That’s true!
    [laughter] LIAM: Oh, we’re serious, motherfuckers. JUSTIN: In the meantime we need to address
    the uh, the issue at hand- ALICE: Which is this big fucking tube, yeah. Why are we looking at this tube, why are we
    looking at the succ tube with some dirt in it? JUSTIN: So, the thing about, y’know, steam
    locomotives, right – such as this one on the screen, which has a lot of jpeg compression. LIAM: Ohh yeah, buddy. Look at all those pixels. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Look, the pixels, they build character. So, there’s some problems with steam locomotives,
    right? ALICE: You can use them for, like, making
    silent movies where they fall into like a ravine, but you can only do that once. JUSTIN: Yes. But like, your steam locomotive, right, there’s
    not necessarily a lot of grip on the wheels – y’know, it’s steel on steel, right, so you
    can’t climb hills too well. The size of the wheels limits the speed it
    can go, as well as some of the mechanical features, like the side rods. It has to haul this big heavy boiler around
    that’s full of water. Uh, has to haul around all the fuel in the
    tender. ALICE: Guy with a shovel, has to haul that
    guy around too. LIAM: And they need their union rep. Their individual union reps.
    [laughter] JUSTIN: The sorta loading gauge, which is
    the maximum size of the vehicle, limits the size of the engine, so that limits power,
    right? ALICE: So you can’t just have a mile-long
    boiler. JUSTIN: The Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad
    experimented with engines with very long, articulated boilers… ALICE: Ah, that’s so cool! LIAM: Oh, bendy boilers! JUSTIN: Yeah, it’s a bendy- it didn’t work
    very well. [disappointed noise]
    JUSTIN: As you might expect. [laughter]
    ALICE: So they really did try the ‘why don’t they just make the whole train out of the
    boiler?’ JUSTIN: Props to them for creativity. But um, it did not work. So, what if you take this whole engine – and
    when I say ‘engine’, I mean the boiler, and like the parts that convert that energy into
    mechanical energy – what if you take that off the rails? Right? LIAM: Literally or metaphorically? JUSTIN: Uh, literally. So… ALICE: Your train doesn’t move, because there’s
    no engine. LIAM: ‘But wait!’ JUSTIN: You have a little bit of… you have
    something to propel it otherwise, right? So, y’know, if you take the engine off the
    train itself, the engine can be as big as you want. You can have lighter and faster and generally
    more nimble trains, right? And today we do this through electric traction,
    like third rail or overhead lines or somethin’ like that. ALICE: Still witchcraft. A sin against the original design of having
    a big locomotive with a big dumb engine on it. JUSTIN: Obviously. We’re all going to hell. LIAM: Over to God, bud. ALICE: Yeah, we don’t understand electric
    traction, we don’t respect it at all… stop being a coward, put the engine in the train. JUSTIN: Yes. So, the Victorians, though, didn’t have electricity,
    right? At least the early ones. ALICE: Yeah. They were too busy covering up table legs
    and, like, doing seances and shit. JUSTIN: Mhm. ALICE: Making weird pornography that survives
    to this day for some reason, so you can go look at some lithographs of like, oh just
    weird shit. LIAM: An ankle. One single ankle. JUSTIN: Just, uh, turned up in the woods,
    y’know. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So, since the Victorians didn’t have electricity, they couldn’t have a third rail
    or an overhead line, so they tried something a little bit different. Which was the atmospheric railway. Now, there’s some early developments for an
    idea like this in around 1824, which is like the basic idea of, y’know, you have a tube,
    right. This is a cross section I’m doing. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: And then you have a train inside the tube…
    [laughter intensifies] JUSTIN: I put a ‘T’ on it for ‘train’, but
    this is lower-case ‘t’ for ‘tube’. [derisive laughter]
    ALICE: Aha. JUSTIN: Yeah. [laughter]
    LIAM: Incredibly good diagramming skills. ALICE: Yeah. And of course, you can do this with a tunnel
    with, I guess, no air in it, because they already thought that if you went over 35mph,
    everybody would just explode. LIAM: Shake out of their bodies, yeah. As you do. ALICE: Sure. Yeah. JUSTIN: So the idea was you’d create a vacuum
    with a steam engine in the tube – a stationary steam engine – and that would draw the train
    through the tube, right? That was an early idea. There wasn’t… the technology didn’t exist
    at the time to do that, right? ALICE: No. No, but what you *could* do is, you could
    still have this idea of having a stationary power source that’s pulling a train through
    a tunnel, you just use a really long rope. Which is what the Glasgow subway did until,
    like, 1970. JUSTIN: Yes! And that’s what, that’s cable cars in San
    Francisco too, and all over America and Europe. Cable-hauled systems are pretty common, yeah. ALICE: It’s a stupid idea, but it’s a hell
    of a lot more practical than this. JUSTIN: Yes. But! So, this early idea was by a man named Valance,
    and I can’t find out any other information about it behind this, right. But the principle of operation here is the
    air pressure difference moves the vehicle. ALICE: Yeah, it sucked it! We’re not joking when we do the ‘succ’ jokes,
    it just goes [VERY evocative sucking noise] [laughter]
    ALICE: The Victorians understand vacuum quite well because it’s relatively easy to create
    with the technology they have available to them. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: It just, I guess, each passenger gets
    an individual fishbowl helmet. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Yeah. “Uh, alright, everyone get on The Succ.”
    [laughter] JUSTIN: So, there’s problems with havin’ a
    really big tube, right? That’s expensive, it’s hard to maintain. We’ll get to, like, *big* tubes later. So they came up with a new idea, right, which
    is instead of having a big tube with the train inside, what if we have the train outside
    the tube – again, capital T for ‘train’ – and then there’s a small tube underneath, right? And then you have the wheels, and you have
    the rails like this, and then that’s the small tube. And then you just have a piston that comes
    down from the train, right, and is in that tube, and you can alter the air pressure in
    the small tube, and that will move the train, right? ALICE: Seems sensible, I suppose? JUSTIN: Right. So this is something which is difficult with
    modern materials, because you’re maintaining this long-
    [laughter] ALICE: Oh, just own me in the next sentence,
    why don’t you? JUSTIN: Very… you’re maintaining this very
    long, like miles long valve, in order to keep the vacuum, right? So, but the Victorians were like, “Nah, we
    can probably do this.” LIAM: “It’ll be fine!”
    [laughter] ALICE: “Yeah, we have six guys with hammers,
    and we’re gonna fuckin’ make this vacuum, that goes for like, up and down valleys and
    shit.” Yeah. Great. JUSTIN: So there was Jacob and Joseph Samuda,
    right, they were shipbuilders by trade. And they came up with a system in 1841 for
    an atmospheric railway, using this concept of this small tube with the piston in it,
    which is what this big diagram is, and I’m gonna explain this. ALICE: Ah, the nineteenth century! When you could just have, like, a side hustle. When you were a shipwright but you could also,
    in your spare time, just invent a railway. You can’t do that these days. You can’t be like an Uber driver, who just
    in their spare time invents a maglev. LIAM: Not with that attitude. JUSTIN: In the Victorian era, anyone who could
    do, like, a nice-looking diagram with, like, crosshatching, was taken seriously. [laughter]
    ALICE: Well, I mean, it’s the same thing with any other profession. Engineering, we can think of that one, but
    you could just be a doctor just by *saying* you were? It ruled. We should go back to that. JUSTIN: Well, y’know, that would definitely
    delegitimize the professional managerial class. LIAM: Fuck ’em. [laughter]
    ALICE: Dr Anderson, Dr Roczniak and Dr Caldwell-Kelly, on scene here. JUSTIN: Doctor. LIAM: Doctor. JUSTIN: Doctor. ALL: Doctor. Doctor. Doctor. [laughter]
    LIAM: The first Saab prototype was designed by two guys, one of whom designed wings and
    one of whom designed bomb racks. And they made cars for like sixty years, so. ALICE: Yeah, well, I’ll raise you another
    one, which is that a doctor invented the chainsaw. Did you know that? JUSTIN: Oh right! Yeah! LIAM: That’ll make surgery a lot more effective. ALICE: Yes! Because it’s very effective at sawing bone! And so it was just like a hand-cranked chain
    with a bunch of saw blades on it, and people just upscaled that when they needed to cut
    down trees, it’s great. …what I’m saying is, bring back that kind
    of interdisciplinary innovation you get when nobody has to have any qualifications to do
    *anything*. JUSTIN: “Alright, give me your arm, we’re
    gonna test this.” [laughter]
    LIAM: “Gimme some skin, man,” just accidentally yank off this dude’s whole fuckin’ wrist. “It’s fine. It’s fine. It’ll buff out.” JUSTIN: Alright, so let’s talk about the Samuda
    system for the atmospheric railway, okay. This is kind of a Looney Tunes sort of system,
    right? Y’know, so you have this continuous vacuum
    tube which is this pipe here, right? You notice there’s a smaller outline here,
    these are like these reinforcing doohickeys here. Okay. So, on top is this two inch groove, right,
    which is, y’know, open. This is your continuous valve. ALICE: Is it just Victorian manufacturing
    that it looks so uneven? Like, it looks like something you’ve stripped
    all of the paint off, but then, like, there’s some plastic where you think there’s metal
    and it just blisters. JUSTIN: Well, you gotta remember it’s 180
    years old. ALICE: Ah. Right. Okay. LIAM: It’s doing its best, ALICE. JUSTIN: Yeah. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: In order to seal this valve when the train is not there, you have an iron-plated
    leather flap- LIAM: Oh boy. JUSTIN: So in the middle where there’s this
    different crosshatching is the leather. [laughter]
    LIAM: That sounds safe, yeah. I like that. I like that. JUSTIN: And this was opened and closed by
    a series of wheels which are on the train, right, and the train, that sort of assembly
    is all of this up here. ALICE: Uh huh. So it opens the flap as it goes past, and
    then closes it behind it. JUSTIN: Yes. LIAM: Nice. ALICE: And in the course of doing that, you
    keep the big tube airtight*ish*? JUSTIN: Yeah, I mean, you’re gonna have a
    little bit of leakage, but it’s not enough that… it’s a very long vacuum tube, so,
    y’know, it’s [equivocating noise] you can probably handle that small amount, yeah. LIAM: It’ll be fine! ALICE: There’s a lot of succ, yeah. JUSTIN: There’s a *lot* of succ there, yeah. ALICE: What you don’t want to do is put your
    hand in this. LIAM: No? JUSTIN: Oh, no. No, you should not do that. This is about to get pretty weird in a second. So, y’know, the piston inside the tube is
    drawn forward by atmospheric pressure, y’know, so this whole assembly is on a special ‘locomotive’
    at the front of the train. But like really it’s just the piston inside
    the pipe. You can’t really see how the piston is oriented
    here, but the whole thing is the size of the inside of the pipe. ALICE: I’m raising my hand here to indicate
    that I have a question. LIAM: [teacherly] Yes, Alice? ALICE: That means no controls to speak of,
    right? You just… JUSTIN: You have… you have brakes. ALICE: Ah, okay. JUSTIN: And the brakes are able to hold the
    train. ALICE: Against this, like, vacuum force? JUSTIN: Yeah. ALICE: That’s a shame, I was envisioning this…
    when you said Looney Tunes, I was envisioning this as just like, once you’re on, once it’s
    sucking, y’know, once you nut, it keeps sucking. [laughter]
    ALICE: You are getting to the next station regardless so long as that vacuum holds. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So the loose end of this iron-plated leather flap, like, right around here – I
    need to switch colors at this point, Jesus, okay, soooo let’s go with blue. So the loose end here, right, right about
    *there*, this is covered in a mixture of beeswax and tallow. Tallow is animal fat, right? ALICE: Yeah, the thing they used to make McDonald’s
    fries good with. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: And now they’re not any more. JUSTIN: Goddamn vegans. Anyway. ALICE: The fucking… I blame Bloomberg for this. Somehow. LIAM: Thanks for nothing, Mike. ALICE: Fucking-
    JUSTIN: That’s not gonna help us get a sponsorship. [laughter]
    ALICE: Well, that’s the thing, if he gets us the sponsorship, we will stop talking shit
    about his jihad against Big Gulps, or whatever. JUSTIN: You’re gonna have to use that bleep
    function now. [laughter]
    ALICE: Oh, yeah. Sorry to suggest that Mike Bloomberg is [very
    long bleep] with Jeffrey Epstein, on Jeffrey Epstein’s plane, doing [shorter bleep]. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: We like to have fun here. LIAM: I was going to say. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So, alright, so this gets weirder, right? I believe… so there’s a copper heating element,
    right, which is ten feet long, on the ‘locomotive’, which I believe is what this thing is, right. And the idea is, the mixture of beeswax and
    tallow is solid at normal atmospheric temperature, but if you heat it a couple of degrees up,
    it melts, right. ALICE: [repulsed] Oh. JUSTIN: So the idea is this heating element
    melts the tallow *before* the wheel picks up the thing, right, and then, when it puts
    it back down afterwards, it reseals and maintains the vacuum, right? LIAM: Suuuuure. ALICE: So this railroad, you’re telling me
    that it’s… I assume basically silent, because there’s
    no engine anywhere near you. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: But it *smells* amazing. JUSTIN: Yeah. [laughter]
    ALICE: You just have kind of a, I guess, barbecue vibe off of it, maybe with some like honey
    mixed in? You’re just like… somebody’s cooking ribs
    up front. JUSTIN: It’s a giant deep fat fryer railroad,
    yeah. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: And of course the other thing is, we don’t have electricity, this is not an
    electric heating element, this heating element is being run off a stove or something, right? LIAM: Oh, Jesus. [laughter]
    ALICE: There’s just a guy up front in the cab whose only controls are a brake, and a
    stove, on which you can, like, make pancakes or something. JUSTIN: He’s makin’ burgers up there, up front,
    can serve ’em to the passengers. [laughter]
    ALICE: The first dining car powered train. It’s like a combined cafe car power unit,
    that’s wonderful. JUSTIN: “Listen, the fat draining off the
    grill is what’s keeping this train running. You guys better keep eating. You don’t eat, we don’t go.” [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So this whole assembly is covered by, I believe this is the weather flap here,
    right, so all of that is… all of that covers the actual valve and everything, that keeps
    the weather out. That means the, y’know, stuff doesn’t get
    soaking wet. ALICE: And you don’t get crap in the tube. Because that’s a big two inch opening. JUSTIN: Yes. Oh yeah. ALICE: Into which people can throw stuff,
    stuff can fall in, they can get leaves in there, uh, whatever. JUSTIN: Yeah. So, as complex as this system is, it’s still
    less complex than the steam locomotive, right? It’s complex in goofier ways, but…
    [laughter] ALICE: You aren’t having… well, you’re having
    to maintain the fire on a stove instead of an enormous boiler that can just fucking explode. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: All of the pressure, all of the pressurized
    vessel, is well away from, like, people. Unless you put your hand in it. Which, again, do not put your hand in the
    atmospheric railway. JUSTIN: Please keep your hands inside the
    vehicle at all times. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Now that we understand this system – at least, a little bit better-
    LIAM: [lying] Sure. JUSTIN: Let’s talk about the first installation. Which was the Dalkey Atmospheric Railway. This is 1892, right. It’s designed by Jacob Samuda because his
    brother died. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: ‘F.’ So it ran from what is now called, uh… ALICE: Oh God. JUSTIN: Dun… ALICE: I’m not gonna help you. JUSTIN: [struggling] Is it ‘Dun la gayre’? ALICE: Dun Laoghaire. JUSTIN: Dun Laoghaire. Look, this is, I don’t know… LIAM: You’re doing just fine. Oh boy. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Yeah. Alright. To Dalkey, right. ALICE: I want to fuck with you there by just
    being like, “Actually it’s pronounced like Duclunngnay.” LIAM: Dayl-keyyyyy. JUSTIN: It’s actually pronounced ‘Duquesne.’ [laughter]
    LIAM: Ah, fuck. …du kesney? Where *am* I? JUSTIN: The one thing about this podcast is,
    so, a lot of times when Liam and I are in the car driving somewhere, we listen to Lions
    Led By Donkeys. Very good podcast. ALICE: Great podcast. JUSTIN: And the host frequently grossly mispronounces
    a word, and they just gloss over it and keep going. It’s like entirely opposite energy to what
    we do, which is to dwell on it endlessly. ALICE: Yeah, we stop, we down tools, yeah. To be fair, in your defence, Dun Laoghaire
    is one of those towns which, like, Irish people find difficult to pronounce. LIAM: D’laaaare. JUSTIN: [incoherent moan]
    ALICE: People say that it’s, like, because the Anglicized pronunciation which like half
    of people use is ‘Dun Leery,’ but if you want to try and pronounce it in Irish, you can
    either do like ‘Doon Lehra’ which is probably the closest thing to a consensus, *or* you
    can just fuckin’ say some fuckin’ syllables. You can say fuckin’ anything. ‘Doon LaghAAOUHR.’ [laughter]
    LIAM: “We’ll just toss in four more letters, who gives a fuck.”
    [laughter] ALICE: Yeah. This is what happens when your language is
    so brutally repressed by the English that like four guys have to reinvent it in 1929. It’s not ideal! [TASTY beer can snap]
    JUSTIN: Uh, just wanna say, triumph to Sinn Fein. Anyway! So, and the other thing is that when this
    railroad was built this was called Kingstown. [laughter]
    LIAM: BOOO ALICE: We fixed that, by making it unpronounceable. JUSTIN: Now no-one can talk about it. Alright, so it’s an atmospheric railway, and
    it ran uphill to Dalkey, right, which is where the pumping station was, somewhere around
    here. And the idea was, you’d run the pump, it started
    operating around five minutes before the train left, and it created fifteen inches of vacuum
    – that’s referring to inches of mercury, which is an old pressure measurement, which is still
    used in a few fields. ALICE: Yeah, we cannot not be archaic and
    obscure, in (what was then) Britain. JUSTIN: Yes. So what they did was, they used atmospheric
    pressure going uphill, and going downhill they just used gravity. ALICE: Yeah, you just shove ’em. It’s fine. JUSTIN: Yeah, you shove ’em. “Eh, it’ll roll downhill, it’s fine.” [laughter]
    ALICE: So you get sucked upwards, uphill towards Dalkey and towards, I guess, the ‘Activate
    Windows’ notification, the unsung co-star of our podcast. [laughter]
    ALICE: Somebody said that we should introduce it. JUSTIN: I *have* a license. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: I just don’t know how to use it. ALICE: You take the numbers and you type them
    into the little prompt, it’s easy. You might have to register for, like, Live,
    or something. JUSTIN: I don’t know where to get the number
    from! I just, I had a license for the old computer,
    which is now the hard drive of the new computer, and-
    ALICE: I’m not sure that it works that way. Anyway. So. LIAM: We switched motherboards too, Microsoft
    hates that shit. JUSTIN: Oh yeah. So there’s 2400 yards of pneumatic pipe, right. It ended 560 yards short of the Dalkey station,
    right. So that led to a couple of problems. LIAM: Only a third of a mile, it’s fine! JUSTIN: Yeah. Sometimes the train would undershoot the platform-
    [laughter] ALICE: ‘Just runs to a stop on air’ is the
    funniest thing I can imagine. LIAM: FUCK. YEAH. ALICE: Just like [‘shoooompf’ noise]. Yeah. That’s wonderful. JUSTIN: Yeah. Just start blowing on a sail. [beat] No, what
    actually happened was that then the passengers had to get off and push. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: There was one incident where the pneumatic locomotive was accidentally uncoupled from
    the train… LIAM: Oh good. ALICE: So it literally… which is just like
    a cabin with a stove in it, and a guy. JUSTIN: It wasn’t even enclosed! It was just a platform. ALICE: With a stove on it. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: And a guy. JUSTIN: And a guy. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: It shot off at high speed, y’know, the claim is that it made the full journey
    in about 75 seconds – just over two miles in 75 seconds. [laughter]
    LIAM: Hey, that’s not bad. JUSTIN: Well, that would probably make it
    the first railway vehicle to exceed 100mph. [all cracking up now]
    JUSTIN: That beats… that beats, um… [overtaken by laughter]
    ALICE: Just this fucking raft, with… a terrified man clinging to the…
    [helpless laughter] ALICE: Like I say, you don’t get this kind
    of innovation any more, y’know? [laughter]
    JUSTIN: It’s a guy in like a top hat, just holding on… LIAM: Frantically on the stove… JUSTIN: …to his monocle!
    [gales of laughter] ALICE: Just about to make some toast or something,
    and he’s the first person to be going over land at 100mph… LIAM: As the train’s coming apart around him. [laughter]
    ALICE: I’m going to be carrying that mental image around for a while. JUSTIN: [almost sobbing] As I said, this is
    a Looney Tunes system. ALICE: Yeah, like, I feel like this is one
    of the, like, harmless fun ones we do, unless your next slide is ‘and it killed five hundred
    people somehow,’ this one feels much more like a palate cleanser. JUSTIN: So, um. LIAM: How many people did it kill? JUSTIN: It didn’t kill anyone. LIAM: WOOOO
    [laughter] JUSTIN: So actually, this system, unlike the
    next ones we’re going to talk about- LIAM: Oh boy. JUSTIN: -was actually very successful. LIAM: Wow. JUSTIN: It operated for about ten years, uh,
    pretty much flawlessly. ALICE: Apart from terrifying one man. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Yeah. Apart from puttin’ the fear of God into one
    person, yes. [laughter]
    ALICE: And inadvertently setting a land speed record that would hold for, I guess, fifty
    years. JUSTIN: At least, yeah. I mean, God, the first steam locomotive to
    hit 100mph depending – if you’re American you say New York Central 999, if you’re British
    you say City of Truro, if you- ALICE: Yes. You do say City of Truro. JUSTIN: If you believe in records you say
    Flying Scotsman. ALICE: Fuck that, no, there was a guy with
    a stopwatch he had prepared in advance, they had the mileposts, it was City of Truro, we’re
    not hearing argument on this one. JUSTIN: Alright. [laughter]
    LIAM: After 999 did it, what happened? [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Y’know, I will give it to City of Truro, because I don’t like the New York Central,
    so. New York City can go fuck itself, anyway. LIAM: That’s true. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: An anti New York podcast. ALICE: Yes. JUSTIN: So, anyway. They replaced this system with conventional
    steam locomotives in 1855 when they figured out how to make steam locomotives bigger. ALICE: BOOOOOO
    JUSTIN: Yeah. ALICE: Take all the fun out of it, why don’t
    you. LIAM: Bastards. JUSTIN: There was a similar system to this,
    installed on the Paris-Saint Germayne line. That operated until 1860. ALICE: [Frenchly] Saint Germain, man. JUSTIN: Saint Germain… LIAM: I didn’t even want to try. JUSTIN: Why don’t they just spell the thing
    the way that- LIAM: They’re *French*! JUSTIN: Every French word has like a hundred
    million, like, letters that you don’t need. LIAM: Meanwhile, here at Bala Cynwyd. ALICE: Yes, I was going to say. And me, with my Irish ancestry on the one
    side standing here in Dun Laoghaire, which has five consonants that aren’t pronounced,
    I have… my house is built on sand on this one. JUSTIN: Language was a mistake. LIAM: That’s true. ALICE: Yes. Why did we try to build a tower, to penetrate
    God itself… that was the original engineering disaster, right there. LIAM: That’s a hell of a bonus episode. JUSTIN: That’ll be a bonus episode, the Tower
    of Babel. [laughter]
    ALICE: I thought it was pronounced ‘bay-ble’ for years and years. I thought it was like the Tower of Bayble. Like, rhymes with ‘bagel’. LIAM: That’s fair. JUSTIN: I think I have heard it pronounced
    that way, though. ALICE: Tower of BabyBel. …hey! That’s my old stomping grounds, my commute
    used to be into school from Beckenham Junction station, on there, to West Dulwich. JUSTIN: Ooh. ALICE: Yeah, this is, this is personal for
    me. LIAM: It’s local content. JUSTIN: Yes. Very local. ALICE: Yes. And I’d like to also draw your attention up
    there to the museum next to Dulwich Park, I’d like you to attempt to pronounce… the
    name of that museum. JUSTIN: What, this guy up here? ALICE: Yeah, this guy up here. JUSTIN: H-Horny Man. The Horny Man Museum. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah. The Horny Man Museum. Love a Horny Man Museum. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So, folks looked at the success of this railway in Ireland and said, “Alright,
    we should apply this technology in England, right? Because… we’re the colonizers, we should
    have the good stuff, right?” So this is the London and Croydon Railway,
    right. ALICE: Connecting two towns, London, big city,
    Croydon at that time, like a small town south of London that’s now just a suburb of it. JUSTIN: Yes. And they ran atmospheric operation between
    Croydon and Forest Hill. So Croydon is down here, Forest Hill is up
    here. ALICE: Yup. Also where I grew up, like, before my parents
    moved to Bromley, I grew up for like the first couple of years of my life in Forest Hill. JUSTIN: Ooh. ALICE: No memories of it one way or the other,
    so, cannot help you on this one. JUSTIN: Okay.
    [laughter] JUSTIN: I don’t remember the atmospheric railway
    either, so. They were gonna, they were like, “Okay, this
    is a great way to run trains, we should build,” they started by building large, elaborate
    pumping stations, like this guy here. ALICE: [mad] Oh, they loved that shit. Didn’t they. Fucking… fucking Victorians. JUSTIN: Yeah. The big gothic tower is a smokestack. LIAM: Love it. ALICE: Ughhhhhhh, fuck off. LIAM: I love it! ALICE: Have you seen the, like, Bazalgette
    sewage pumping stations? JUSTIN: Oh, yeahhhh. ALICE: That are built like cathedrals. LIAM: Yes. Beautiful. ALICE: Ugh, just, aaargh. LIAM: Beautiful. More. More! ALICE: No! Less! It’s annoying! LIAM: No, shut up. ALICE: It’s so fucking, like… [fancy Victorian
    voice] “Ah, civi architecture, this is a cathedral, ooooh. We think that it’s very fancy to have our
    secular building that we pump the shit water through,” ugh, no, twee. Fuck off. JUSTIN: Nah, I like the cathedral of shit. I think it’s a good thing. It shows that we live in a society. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah. If you look at the plan, it just folds out
    into a big joker face, for some reason. JUSTIN: So, the first test run of this system
    was November 1st, 1846, right. The train hit 52mph. ALICE: That’s… pretty good. JUSTIN: Yeah. For 1846, that’s *very* good. ALICE: And silently, too! JUSTIN: Yes. No noise. ALICE: Smelling amazing. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: Just fucking gliding through South
    London. JUSTIN: Smelling like a McDonald’s the whole
    way. LIAM: Oh man, I would love that. I would be so happy. ALICE: Oh, yeah. Yeah, fucking. That kind of glory did not return to Penge
    until Wimpy Burger started closing in the 70s.
    [laughter] ALICE: Do you know about Wimpy Burger? Wimpy Burger is like, the last… I think it’s *actually* American in origin,
    but we think of it as a British brand, because it’s so terrible. LIAM: It’s called Wimpy Burger. ALICE: It’s called Wimpy Burger! And it, like, if you Google Image ‘Wimpy Burger,’
    you’ll see the inside, uh. They keep, I think there’s still a couple
    left, still running. It is the most depressing food experience
    you will have in your *life*. Uh, I highly recommend it, first live show
    is happening in one, if we can find one. LIAM: [looking it up] Oh God, it looks depressing. [laughter]
    ALICE: Brown floors, lots of linoleum. JUSTIN: So they opened this railway January
    16th of, I believe 1847, right? And at 11am that day a crankshaft broke on
    one of the stationary engines at Croydon. LIAM: Oh good. ALICE: Whoops. Maybe you shouldn’t have installed it under
    a fucking flying buttress then! [laughter]
    LIAM: No, shut up. Shut up. Shut up. JUSTIN: They still had another engine that
    was running, though. But then at 7:20pm the other engine broke
    also. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah. You have to, like, try to get in under a gothic
    vaulted ceiling with a wrench now. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So the issue, of course, put the line out of service until February 10th, y’know,
    so the first day didn’t go so well. The problem here isn’t so much with the atmospheric
    system itself, it was the bad engines. But, as they brought the system back into
    service, they discovered other problems. So, summer of 1846. Okay, so maybe it was… I’m screwing up my dates here. Dates aren’t important, anyway, summer of
    1846 was a very hot summer, right? And the London and Croydon Railway did not
    install weather flaps on their pipes. ALICE: [stuttering in rage] D-d-d-d-d-did
    they spend the weather flap money on constructing a fucking belfry for their stationary engine? JUSTIN: [deadpan] Yeah, I mean, you gotta
    put the bells somewhere, to indicate when the train is arriving, or departing… or
    getting married. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah, it has to have fucking gables, and it has to have all of this ornamentation. JUSTIN: It’s very nice, Alice, I don’t- we
    should have good public architecture. ALICE: If it’s so nice, why do you only have
    a chalk drawing of it? Like, London, South London actually kind of
    mostly pretty decent at preserving Victorian public architecture, apparently nobody had
    like any sentimental attachment to this bitch, because it was just like, bulldozed immediately. JUSTIN: It was probably bombed by the Nazis. [annoyed antifascist noises]
    JUSTIN: Or it’s a Wimpy Burger now. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah. Possibly. LIAM: ‘Eat horse.’ JUSTIN: It’s a Wetherspoons now. [laughter]
    ALICE: It’s four different Starbucks. JUSTIN: So, the ambient heat from, just the
    high temperatures, melted the tallow mixture without, y’know, the heating element, right? ALICE: Oh, that’s gotta smell so good. JUSTIN: Made it difficult to hold a vacuum. ALICE: Yeah, *but*, made all of South London
    and Penge and all that smell amazing. Like, permanently, not just when there’s a
    train coming through. JUSTIN: Oh yeah. That’s probably why they rebuilt the Wimpy
    Burger there, to get that feeling back. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So, another problem. And depending on what source you go by, this
    either happened or didn’t happen. But there was the problem of rats. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Flash image of Pete Buttigieg here. ALICE: You have to actually do that, you realize. JUSTIN: Yeah, I have to do that on the… I’ll edit it in. The rats got in the pipes, they wanted to
    eat the tallow, and then, y’know, there’s a bunch of rats in the pipe, and then they
    turn the vacuum pumps on… ALICE: Ohhhh. JUSTIN: And they all get sucked out, or they
    all get like annihilated and turned into viscera when the train comes by…
    [laughter and disgust] JUSTIN: Just otherwise gruesomely murdered. ALICE: Oh no. Oh *no*. The guy who has to, like, stand at the end
    of the vacuum- [TASTY beer can snap]
    LIAM: To clean out the rat smoothie, yeah. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: ‘I’m the guy who cleans out the rat viscera.’ ALICE: That’s the only guy who should have
    his own special union, is the guy who has to, like, bolt the cover off, and have a fucking
    stream of rats and rat parts just jet out, like a fucking fountain. [laughter]
    ALICE: Oh, God. And if they’re just pressurizing it ahead
    of the train, the idea of… you get on this nice quiet train, with no noise to mask any
    of this, and you set off in your stovepipe hat with your best girl on your arm, and it
    sets off from the station with the noise of a hundred rats just being *crunched*. Auuuugh. Jesus! LIAM: Ah, yes, me and my rat smoothie. JUSTIN: Just a geyser of rat viscera…
    [laughter] LIAM: That’s good protein, man! ALICE: How do you keep a vacuum in a pipe
    that is mostly rat blood, at this point? [laughter]
    ALICE: You said this may not have happened, I choose to believe it. LIAM: I refuse to live in a world where, yeah,
    no. ALICE: I know deeply in my heart several things. Like, that will never be rebutted by any amount
    of historical evidence? I know the Trump pee tape is real, I know
    Jussie Smollett did nothing wrong- LIAM: Oh, I saw this tweet! ALICE: And I know this thing killed *hundreds*
    of rats a *second*. LIAM: That’s called being effective!
    [laughter] ALICE: The Rat Annihilator here. JUSTIN: Alberta’s got nothin’ on this thing. [helpless laughter]
    ALICE: That means you could only run this in the province of Alberta! That’s perfect. JUSTIN: No rats, yeah. …fills up with pigeons instead. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Or beavers, or somethin’. What Canadian animal would get in there? ALICE: Like, raccoons, somehow. JUSTIN: A small moose. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah. The antlers just get wedged, and you can’t
    keep vacuum pressure. JUSTIN: Alright, so those were the summer
    problems, in the winter- LIAM: Oh, Jesus fuck. JUSTIN: You had a different problem. In the winter, of course, y’know, it rained. And then it also got cold, which meant the
    rain froze in the leather… LIAM: Auuugh. JUSTIN: …which caused it to crack. ALICE: Tube full of *frozen* rat blood! LIAM: Nyuuuuuuugh. JUSTIN: And that meant that this leather flap
    no longer worked especially well to hold the seal, cause it’s all cracked and nasty, it
    didn’t work so good, right? So they abandoned atmospheric operation after
    the first year. LIAM: Cowards. JUSTIN: It was like, “Okay.”
    [laughter] ALICE: You’re suggesting that they didn’t
    have enough time to work the kinks out of the machine for killing rats? LIAM: Yes. JUSTIN: Yes. Maybe they could have installed the one thing
    that made the other two systems that we mentioned previously work. But they didn’t do that. Their plan was to extend the system, but uhhhhhh,
    didn’t happen. Cause they were cowards. ALICE: I see Crystal Palace has its own, like,
    branch line there, and this being the 18… well, the mid 19th century, I assume this
    was also a big deal for, like, The Great Exhibition thing. Where you had, like, all of Empire coming
    to show off its new bullshit, and meanwhile, Britain brings to the exhibition a train that,
    like, arrives spewing rat blood ahead of it. [laughter]
    LIAM: Triumph to the empire. JUSTIN: Oh no, actually… this branch line,
    I don’t think existed at the time. What I did to do this diagram is I just clicked
    on Forest Hill, right, and then the Overground line showed up. And I was like, “That’s probably sufficient.” We will talk about Crystal Palace later, though. Anyway, so this installation failed pretty
    miserably, uh, which means we should talk about the *next* installation. Where we get to talk about our favorite guy,
    Isambard Kingdom Brunel. LIAM: [weirdly high-pitched] YAAAAAAAAAAY
    ALICE: BOOOOOOOOOOO LIAM: Aw.
    [laughter] ALICE: Mixed response there. We’re an ambivalent podcast to Brunel. JUSTIN: Yeah, we’re Brunel-agnostic. LIAM: [chanting] BRUNEL GAUGE. BRUNEL GAUGE. BRUNEL GAUGE. JUSTIN: Yes. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So, there was this guy named Isambard Kingdom Brunel. His father was Mark Brunell, who of course
    played for the Washington NFL franchise… [laughter]
    LIAM: “Stick to sports!” JUSTIN: Stickin’ to sports. Uh, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a railway
    he called the Great Western Railway. Everything they did was big and dumb, right? LIAM: YES. ALICE: Just like every fucking other thing
    he did. The Severn Bridge, Brunel gauge, uh… the
    fucking all-iron, I forget what it’s called, SS Fucking Whatever, Dumb Ship. JUSTIN: The Great Eastern? ALICE: Yeah, the dumb fuckin’ Great Eastern. LIAM: HMS Disappointment. JUSTIN: The biggest ship in the world, from
    the day it was built till the day it was scrapped, and then they didn’t build a bigger one for
    like another 20, 30 years. ALICE: Yeah. Cause building a ship that big, with the technology
    of the time, or 30 years later, was dumb. Isambard Kingdom Brunel is the Elon Musk of
    his day. That’s, I’ll fucking die on that hill. LIAM: Aww. JUSTIN: No, Isambard Kingdom Brunel actually
    got shit done. [laughter]
    ALICE: [grudgingly] I suppose the Severn Bridge is still up, I’ll give him that much. JUSTIN: Yeah, and the Great Western Railway’s
    still there. The, um. What else did Brunel do? The… two of the three boats are gone, but
    one’s still there. ALICE: Box Tunnel. JUSTIN: Box Tunnel’s still there, yeah. The Great Western Railway was built to Brunel
    gauge – so modern railroads are 4 feet, 8 and a half inches between rails. Brunel gauge was-
    ALICE: ‘Offer not valid for viewers in Ireland.’ JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: Or Queensland. Which, for some reason, uses Irish gauge [bzzt
    wrongo]. LIAM: As you do. JUSTIN: Here in Philadelphia we use Pennsylvania
    trolley gauge for the subway- LIAM: THE WHAT
    JUSTIN: Or, excuse me, for the El and the trolleys. LIAM: Yeah. Yeah. It’s not a subway. IT’S NOT A SUBWAY. I AM SO SICK OF HAVING TO EXPLAIN THIS TO
    PEOPLE. IT’S CALLED AN ‘EL’ BECAUSE IT’S ELEVATED. UUUUGH. …Sorry. Carry on. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: [carrying on] Brunel gauge, instead of being four feet, eight and a half inches
    between the rails, is seven feet and a quarter inch between the rails. ALICE: Mmm. Kind of railway megalomania. Like, the Nazis tried to do this shit too,
    of having like a double gauge railroad. JUSTIN: Theirs was ten foot, I believe. LIAM: Jesus fuck. JUSTIN: They never actually built any. ALICE: No. But, something about wanting a Big Train…
    like, bigger than is necessary or practical? Uh, yeah. It attracts that kind of megalomania, I guess. JUSTIN: Well, Brunel’s gauge had the advantage
    that it was much smoother at high speeds, right? …high speeds were like 50 to 60mph. The Great Western Railway was built from London
    to… Bristol, right? With Brunel gauge. Now, by 1844 it had been extended to Exeter,
    which is up here. That’s how you pronounce that, right? ALICE: Yes. Lovely town, nice cathedral, good university,
    all that. Very boring. JUSTIN: And then the next logical extension
    was from Exeter to Plymouth, right? ALICE: Yes. JUSTIN: This was called the South Devon Railway. The terrain was not especially great, right? It was steep grades, and sharp corners required
    to build this railroad. And those sharp corners were seven foot gauge,
    of course. Um, now Brunel visited the Dalkey Railway
    in Ireland, he was like, [Brunel voice] “Uh, this seems like a good idea.” ALICE: Apparently not on the one day where
    they just fired a terrified man down the-[cracking up again]
    JUSTIN: He’d probably be way into that. “Oh, I can go a lot faster.” ALICE: That’s true. LIAM: “WHEEEEEEEEEEE.” [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah, the new Brunel railway system – it transports one terrified person per hour. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So he’s like, “Okay, atmospheric propulsion’s a good idea,” cause atmospheric propulsion
    means, y’know, you can run the trains faster, you can use bigger engines, and you have less
    fuel consumption, you can have all these bright ideas, like… one of the advantages that
    was thought at the time was that an atmospheric railway train cannot derail? ALICE: Uh. LIAM: Sure. Why not. JUSTIN: Because the piston is stuck in the,
    um, in the tube. ALICE: You have an extra point of… thing,
    yeah, I get that. JUSTIN: Which means you can run it on tighter
    corners. ALICE: Ah, we missed out on such a great baroque
    railway disaster by the fact that this didn’t work. [laughter]
    ALICE: Like, I feel like if it *had*, we would be talking about the fucking Dawlish Warren
    Great Train Derailment, where this fuckin’ guy decided, “Ah, we can just do maximum speed,”
    and just sent a passenger train fucking hurtling into the fucking ocean. JUSTIN: The first passenger train to make
    it to the other side of the English Channel. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: By accident, yeah. LIAM: HOVERTRAIN. JUSTIN: Alright, so Brunel was like, “We’re
    gonna use atmospheric propulsion here, too,” and he also proceeded to fuck it up. ALICE: Of course. LIAM: How dare you? ALICE: As was his wont, yes. JUSTIN: The first section that was installed
    was from Exeter down to… uh. ALICE: Teignmouth. JUSTIN: Teen-muth. Okay. Yes. Teignmouth. Thank you for pronouncing that, saving me
    some embarrassment there. And then that was later extended on to Newton
    Abbot, right. ALICE: Stupid names in Devon, but, y’know. JUSTIN: Yes. This is a much longer installation of atmospheric
    railway than had been tried before. This is about twenty miles in total, right? And Jacob Samuda, who designed the Dalkey
    Railway, he was contracted to maintain this system. Uh, and they came up with a bunch of clever
    mechanical devices for, like, switches, and grade crossings, right, so this is actually
    the first railway with protected grade crossings, with gates that would come down when the train
    went by. ALICE: Huh. JUSTIN: But also, like, flaps that would cover
    the um, the pipe, so that people could bring a wagon across. ALICE: Oh God, imagine that breaking, and
    your wagon just gets fuckin’ The Succ. [laughter]
    ALICE: Just get like a bunch of rat viscera just spewed out of your wagon, yeah. JUSTIN: The whole horse is sucked in through
    a two inch gap. [we all groan in horror]
    ALICE: Like fucking Byford Dolphin, every level crossing. JUSTIN: So this was opened in stages from
    September 13th 1847 to March 2nd 1848, and it ran trains at very high speeds with this
    system, about 64mph. ALICE: Jesus. LIAM: When was this again? JUSTIN: 1847. LIAM: Oh, goddamn. ALICE: Jesus. JUSTIN: They ran trains at very high speeds,
    *when the system was running.* ALICE: Uh huh. JUSTIN: Because, once again… ALICE: The rest of the time there was a horse
    stuck in there… [laughter]
    ALICE: And you gotta send in a guy with a brush. JUSTIN: “I gotta clean out the horse viscera.” ALICE: You gotta sweep that for like the other
    18 miles of track. JUSTIN: But once again they decided, we’re
    going to skip the weather flaps. ALICE: Oh, of course. JUSTIN: Right? LIAM: As you do. JUSTIN: So, it had the same problems as the
    London and Croydon. The leather froze and cracked in the winter,
    and dried out and stiffened in the summer. ALICE: Well, there’s a couple of things here. You’ll notice, on this map, that Exeter is
    next to a big river, called the Exe, and it’s a very silty river, there’s a lot of, like,
    you can see there’s a lot of mud, there’s a lot of dirt. Um, and even still today, the sea wall at
    Dawlish – it’s a beautiful railway, if you want to visit I highly recommend it – but
    that rail line, modernized as it is, gets fucking destroyed and fully, like, ‘compromised
    to a permanent end’ about once a year, when a big storm rolls through and it just washes
    the whole thing into the ocean. So I’m imagining that, but with an open tube
    filled with horse guts. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: And I’m not picturing it doing so well
    on the reliability front. …also, is that a town called Chudley? JUSTIN: Chudley.. ALICE: If you look, like… yeah. Home of the CHUDs. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Samuda, who has the maintenance contract, recommends to the board, he’s like, “Put in
    a weather flap. Put a weather flap on, you’ll be fine.” And they’re like, “Nahhhhhh. We’re not gonna pay for that.” [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So, Brunel tries to correct the problem by, y’know, getting crews to go in and dump
    a bunch of whale oil on the leather flap to, y’know, lubricate it, right? [laughter]
    ALICE: What?! He’s just, like, oiling a big twenty mile
    long thing of leather? JUSTIN: Well, this didn’t work. ALICE: You don’t say. JUSTIN: The weather flap was the thing they
    should’ve done, and they decided not to do that. And then, since they hadn’t installed a telegraph
    system, that meant that the big stationary steam engines that were in big buildings like
    this guy here, which is now apparently a garden centre, that they had to pump to a timetable
    as opposed to pumping to the actual location of the train. So, if the train was running late… ALICE: This is a big steam engine, too, you
    can’t just start and stop them, right? You’ve gotta… quite literally warm up the
    engine, right? JUSTIN: This is a *huge* fucking stationary
    steam engine, which occupied a whole building and generated 65 horsepower. [laughter]
    LIAM: That’s efficient, goddamn. That’s what we like to see!
    [laughter] ALICE: I mean, it makes a lot more sense if
    you know that the precursors to locomotive-driven railways were just a tramway where you have
    a single horse pull a cart down some rails, but Jesus Christ. JUSTIN: “We have a whole building, that’s
    like having 65 horses.” [laughter]
    JUSTIN: “Which is the same number of horses that were sucked into the pipe last month.” [laughter intensifies]
    ALICE: That’s what the horsepower measures. [Justin laughs so hard he knocks over something]
    ALICE: Oh, God. This was an early innovation in the thing
    that makes railways still terrifying to me, The Rail That Kills You Instantly If You Touch
    It. We wouldn’t do that again until electricity,
    really. JUSTIN: This is the law of conservation of
    horses. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah, you feed the horse into a closed system…
    [helpless weeping] LIAM: Incredible work. ALICE: [breathless from laughter] Oh God,
    imagine if this is the one that takes all three of us out. JUSTIN: This has definitely been one of our
    dumber episodes. [laughter]
    ALICE: Look, no-one can say that we just read the Wikipedia page, because the Wikipedia
    page isn’t a one-paragraph summary of the facts, and a seven-scroll deep monologue about
    horse viscera… [we are all laughing like Risitas now]
    JUSTIN: So… [we keep laughing]
    ALICE: Get it together, Justin. LIAM: You can do this. JUSTIN: [barely holding it together] This
    giant building… this giant building, with the 65 horsepower engine in it, it wound up
    consuming about three times more coal than expected, and about… just over the amount
    of coal than they would consume with regular steam locomotives, right? ALICE: Ah, cool, okay. JUSTIN: So, by August of 1848, Brunel was
    like, “Nnnnnngh, we should just use regular steam locomotives, guys.” ALICE: I love the idea that we’re having to
    do all of this really marginal stuff to, like, try to end climate change now, because we’re
    just content to tinker around the edges, and we can be like, ah, well, you can have like
    a hybrid vehicle, or you can have like a high mileage internal combustion engine. And back in the day you could just be like,
    “Yeah, I’m gonna run this steam engine all day, 24/7, to pump air into a tube that just
    leaks right back out, to generate 65 horsepower for nothing.” JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: Just, Yes. Yes. I, agh. Beautiful. JUSTIN: So, shortly after Brunel recommends
    the system should be abandoned, Samuda comes in to a shareholders’ meeting, and he just
    fucking lays into ’em for not properly maintaining anything, or not allowing *him* to maintain
    anything, and… well, they decide to abandon the system anyway. ALICE: Aww. JUSTIN: And they replace it with steam trains. ALICE: He got his, like, Twelve Angry Men
    moment and it didn’t, like, help at all. JUSTIN: Yeah. ALICE: Sucks. JUSTIN: No, it *didn’t* suck. LIAM: That was the problem, you see. JUSTIN: That was the *end* of the sucking. Yes. But this was not the end of atmospheric traction. It would take a while, though, to come back. So, after this there were a couple of systems
    where they sort of tried, uh, the system I mentioned earlier, which is a whole big train
    powered by air pressure that runs in a big tube, right? So this is the Crystal Palace Pneumatic Railway,
    this is 1864. ALICE: Ahhh! So they didn’t, like, come to the great exhibition
    just behind this wave of rat guts, but instead just shot-
    LIAM: Disappointing. ALICE: Yeah, you just shot the train through
    the tunnel like a big fucking cork through a bottle, great. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: The wave of rat blood comes *behind*
    it, rather than in front. LIAM: World’s shittiest wake, yeah. JUSTIN: That’s smart, that’s how you don’t
    terrify the passengers, cause they can’t see the giant, y’know, tsunami of rat blood behind
    you, right. ALICE: That’s actually how all modern subway
    trains work. That’s why they don’t let you look out of
    the back. JUSTIN: Yes. So this was a half mile pneumatic railway,
    it ran from one end of Crystal Palace Park to the other. ALICE: Which is not a long way, yeah. JUSTIN: It was a demonstrator line. There’s almost no traces of it left today,
    there’s not a lot of information on it. ALICE: There’s no trace of the fucking Crystal
    Palace left, cause that shit burned down. JUSTIN: Well, the football club is still around. ALICE: Well, depending on how you define ‘around’,
    yeah. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: But yeah, there’s no Crystal Palace, there’s no nothin’, they got rid of everything,
    because they suck. ALICE: There’s a big antenna in Crystal Palace
    Park, and that’s it. Love a big antenna. I think it’s like the second highest free-standing
    one in Europe. JUSTIN: Damn. ALICE: It’s big! It’s big, I’ll give it that. It’s not quite as cool as the rat train, though. I do like that little flap, too. JUSTIN: And then… ALICE: Aww, that’s adorable! JUSTIN: Oh, this? Yeah. Alright, so then the next attempt at this
    is something called Beach Pneumatic Transit, in New York City, right? ALICE: Ah, it takes you to the beach. Fine, yeah. JUSTIN: Uh, it went about three hundred feet. LIAM: Uh huh.
    [laughter] JUSTIN: This was to demonstrate both new tunnelling
    methods for New York City’s subway system, and pneumatic propulsion of trains, right,
    and this was 1870, well before any actual subways were dug. There were only a couple of elevated trains
    at that point, and they were all steam-hauled. So, y’know, it took you through the tunnel,
    a whopping three hundred feet out, and then three hundred feet back. ALICE: It’s adorable, though, it’s so cute! JUSTIN: It was supposed to be a larger project
    but, uh, Boss Tweed at Tammany Hall- LIAM: WOOOOOOO
    JUSTIN: -killed that project. LIAM: Aww. ALICE: We love some old-fashioned corruption. JUSTIN: Yes. So it was built entirely in secret…
    [laughter] JUSTIN: So after it had been demonstrated
    to the public in 1870, finally permission was granted for expansion by the city in 1873,
    but immediately the bottom fell out of the stock market, and it was closed and abandoned. ALICE: Aww. I do like that back in the day you could just
    be like, “Yeah, we built a railway in secret. Can you approve more railway?” JUSTIN: I like that they have big, like, Greco-Roman
    statues. ALICE: Yessss. I like that, yeah. Plus the train just looks like this barrel,
    you know? I really like that. I like the wooden siding on there. JUSTIN: Oh yeah. And then so it was closed and abandoned, right. They rediscovered it in 1912, while they were
    excavating the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Broadway Line. And the whole thing was basically within the
    site that’s currently occupied by City Hall station on the N or W trains today. ALICE: Mm. They tapped into this, uh, vacuum line, and
    the wave of rats, just came at them. Killed… LIAM: “Close it up! Close it back up! Close it back up! Close it back up!”
    [laughter] ALICE: It’s fine, once the worst of the rat
    passes you by, then you’ve got a nice new tunnel. JUSTIN: And that’s how they built City Hall
    station. ALICE: Yeah, what about the real rats, above
    ground, am I right, fellas? LIAM: Ohhhhh. JUSTIN: Ohhhhhh. Got ’em. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Mayor Bloomberg, sponsor our podcast. So, anyway. There’s a rumor that there’s a small portion
    still intact, that if you find the right manhole, you can get into? The remnants of this system are not very extensive. It’s not like in Ghostbusters 2. ALICE: That documentary we love. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: I would like to, like, put out for
    discussion the idea that once a year, Mike Bloomberg, like, has the manhole opened for
    him and goes and sits on the tiny train that carries him like 25 feet, and then comes back
    up and is like, “Mm. Yes.” JUSTIN: I mean, the one thing that like Mayor
    Bloomberg did, was he was a regular subway rider, like deBlasio doesn’t do that. Now I’ve said something positive about Bloomberg,
    so I’m cancelled. LIAM: GIVE US YOUR MONEY. Give us your money. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Yeah, shouldn’t have said that. So, both this and the Crystal Palace Railway
    operated on the same principle – it’s a big railroad car in a pneumatic tube. Neither of them works well enough for commercial
    operation, atmospheric propulsion becomes a solution in search of a problem after third
    rail and overhead electrification is developed, right? ALICE: Yeah, just kind of a novelty. JUSTIN: But this is not the last application
    of vacuums to, y’know, rail transportation, right? Which means we have to talk about… the vacuum
    tube train. ALICE: [awed] Ahhh, that’s a *sick* drawing! JUSTIN: Oh yeah. LIAM: Oh, yes. ALICE: Really like this one. JUSTIN: So, Robert Goddard, who was a famous
    rocket scientist, right, he wrote a short story when he was in college called ‘The High-Speed
    Bet’. This is in 1904. It was published in 1909 in Scientific American,
    along with an editorial critique, which was called ‘The Limit of Rapid Transit’, right. And this is the first recorded conception
    of the idea of a vacuum tube train. So, what is this thing, right? What’s the thing that’s going on here? So, when you have a train, right, any kind
    of train, even an atmospheric railway, you have a lot to overcome in terms of forces
    to operate at very high speed, right? Y’know, there’s wheel wear, there’s the amount
    of power you can supply to the motors, but at some point the biggest factor is air resistance,
    right? LIAM: Right. ALICE: Yeah. Which is why we love the Metroliner, or those
    Soviet diesel locomotives that are just a big brick, that have absolutely no aerodynamics
    to them, at all. JUSTIN: I always thought like a fully loaded,
    big long manifest freight train going 80mph, with like 200 cars, which are all different
    shapes, that’s the biggest ‘fuck you’ to aerodynamics out there. [laughter]
    ALICE: You just look at the wind tunnel schematics of that and it’s just all red. JUSTIN: Yeah. But the idea with the vacuum tube train is
    that air resistance is the biggest problem – what if you got rid of the air? LIAM: Aha!
    [derisive laughter] ALICE: That’s *also* a ‘fuck you’ to aerodynamics,
    but in a different way. You’re just like, “Well, we just lop off the
    first two syllables and now it’s just dynamics, what now, mothefucker?” JUSTIN: This is actually like something I
    don’t understand – if there’s no air, why is this streamlined? Why is it not just a blunt end? ALICE: Yeah. Why can’t you run like a Soviet TEM through
    this? JUSTIN: Yeah. So a vacuum tube train is usally – or a ‘vac
    train’ if you wanna be, y’know, cool. A cool term. Usually a magnetic levitation train, or a
    maglev train, that runs in a vacuum tube, at very high speed, right? ALICE: But a maglev train in atmosphere is
    already very high speed, right? JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: You can take the maglev in Shanghai
    and it gets you from one place to another at like 200mph, right? JUSTIN: I think that one tops out at like
    250 or something like that. The Japanese one they’re developing right
    now tops out at like 300-something? So the vacuum tube train was developed at
    the Research And Development Corporation in 1970, that’s where they really did sort of
    engineering- ALICE: RAND Corp?! JUSTIN: Yeah, RAND! ALICE: Ah, they took time out of, like, making
    up punch cards for Robert Macnamara to say that the Vietnam War was going well, to do
    like, ‘what if we just sucked all the air out of a big tunnel?’ JUSTIN: Yeah, they finally did some suck.
    [laughter] JUSTIN: So, there have been many proposals
    for this over the years, some of which got a whole bunch of traction, actually. So what we’re looking at here is a render
    for what was gonna be called SwissMetro, which is the idea they were gonna dig vacuum tube
    tunnels from, like, major Swiss cities between each other, and they’d go, y’know, you’d have
    this fast ass train. ALICE: Given the, uh, CERN, I want to know
    what the Swiss know that we don’t that they’re just, like, “Ah, we have to dig all of these
    tunnels under our country for some reason. Don’t ask any questions.” JUSTIN: Cause they have mountains. It’s always mountains, is the thing. ALICE: It’s definitely the mountains and not,
    like, the same thing that led to every Swiss apartment building having to have a bunker
    until, like, last year. [TASTY beer can snap]
    ALICE: Yeah, no, I’m not worried about this at all. JUSTIN: It’s because all the Swiss have guns. Cause they’re all terrified of each other,
    secretly. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah, that’s true. Although, they have the Chris Rock kind of
    gun control, where after their first kind of mass shooting, they kept letting you have
    the gun at home, but they strictly controlled the bullets? LIAM: I always liked that idea! ALICE: Yeah! So if you do national service, which almost
    all Swiss men do, you get your SG552, at home, in a closet, but you get one sealed can of
    ammunition. And then, I guess, you get the order to open
    that if the Germans roll over the border again. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: If the Germans rolled over the border here, I would be pretty unhappy, I would definitely… LIAM: I too would be pretty unhappy. ALICE: Sure. LIAM: Not again, motherfuckers!
    [laughter] JUSTIN: So, other ideas have been pretty outlandish
    for how to use these vacuum tube trains, like… one idea which got a documentary on a show
    called Extreme Engineering in, like, the early 2000s, was ‘let’s have a submerged floating
    tunnel under the Atlantic Ocean,’ from New York to London, right? ALICE: Oh cool! Well, if we can do England to Northern Ireland,
    why not? JUSTIN: I mean, you would also need some kind
    of floating doohickey for that, otherwise you’re just trying to anchor foundations into
    a seabed made exclusively of bombs. [laughter]
    ALICE: No, yeah, this is fine. In each case, we’ll just like, send train
    after train into a flooded tunnel that goes nowhere. Yeah. Great. JUSTIN: “I’m sending in more trains.” [laughter]
    JUSTIN: So the idea is, y’know, you would build this long submerged floating tunnel,
    and you would send large, y’know, trains at a high frequency, and using vacuum tube maglevs,
    you could top out at 10, 15,000mph. ALICE: Oh cool. JUSTIN: And that gets you end-to-end in about
    45 minutes. Your top speed is limited by passenger comfort,
    at that point. You can’t accelerate too fast or everyone’s
    gonna, y’know, fuckin’ hurl. ALICE: Become… yeah, or worse. We have moved in the realm of, like, fucking
    around with pressure and railways, from ‘we kill a bunch of rats, and we liquefy the rats,’
    to ‘we liquefy the passengers,’ and you just like open the doors at the other end, and
    there’s just like this mulch of commuters. LIAM: Efficiency! JUSTIN: We fulfil the Victorian prophecy of,
    y’know, high speed sucking the air out of your lungs. Finally. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: These ideas are outlandish… they’re not *impossible*. They can be done with modern engineering. It would take a lot of money and a lot of
    effort. ALICE: Which we can’t even muster up to, uh,
    stop all of us from broiling to death, but we’re gonna do it for, like, the sake of a
    45 minute commute from London to New York. Sure. JUSTIN: And the thing is, you gotta do something
    about air travel eventually. LIAM: Ship! ALICE: Yeah, it’s called boats! It’s called boats! LIAM: I do like boats. JUSTIN: Boat would probably do it, it’s more
    practical in this, yeah. ALICE: Or, like, fucking, I don’t know, any
    of the, like, long haul, electric mostly-gliders covered in solar panels planes that people
    have been fucking around with. JUSTIN: I dunno, I think there should be – I
    think we should just do the vacuum tube train. This is my – I think it’s a good idea, we
    should do it. LIAM: Yep. Yes. Co-sign. [laughter]
    ALICE: No, no no no. Bring back flying boats. I want an electric flying boat, and I want
    to land in New York harbor. JUSTIN: That would also be cool. ALICE: Right? Yeah. It’d be cool as hell. JUSTIN: The thing is, we have this wild idea
    for vacuum tube trains, which is *technically* feasible although it’s a long time in the
    future. And then we have this guy who shows up, named
    Elon Musk. LIAM: [settling in for a long one] Oh, boy. JUSTIN: Let’s take the vacuum tube train,
    and make it dumber and worse. LIAM: Yes. Of course. ALICE: Let’s make the energy sword from Halo,
    for some reason. JUSTIN: Yeah. ALICE: That is the vibe I get off of this
    concept art, it’s so, like, Bungie circa 2000, it’s, uugh. JUSTIN: So, Elon Musk’s atmospheric railway
    is, y’know, the Hyperloop, right? And the Hyperloop, the idea is, rather than
    doing a full vacuum, we have slightly less than a full vacuum, right, and in order to
    compensate for that, the front of the vehicle is a big air compressor turbine. ALICE: Ah, cool. JUSTIN: That funnels the air into a tiny pipe,
    that then exhausts out the back. And then there’s other factors here, like,
    instead of having a big train… ALICE: Yeah? JUSTIN: There’s a tiny pod, right. ALICE: Of course! To encourage, like, independence and innovation. Whomst among us, has not wanted to be in the
    middle part of a running jet engine? LIAM: It would make your commute exciting,
    yeah. Exactly. JUSTIN: With, like, eight other people. The other idea is that you run these pods
    at, like, ridiculous frequencies, like once every thirty seconds through your mostly-evacuated
    tube. And despite these very high frequencies, the
    capacity is still absurdly low. Like, much lower than any rail line. Because the pods are so small. As described by Mr Elon Musk, if you wanted
    a Hyperloop system that had the same capacity as, like, a subway train with a 1000 people
    each train that arrives every 5 minutes, you’d need a pod arriving every 2.5 seconds. ALICE: But this is the thing, we’ve come back
    to Mecca, or the Ganges, or the Western Wall again, of there being too many people and
    it being too crowded. LIAM: All the goddamn time. ALICE: I mean, the thing is, also, this doesn’t
    have a weather flap, which means it’s doomed to failure. JUSTIN: That is true, yes. ALICE: Like, how are you gonna protect all
    of the tallow? [laughter]
    JUSTIN: The other thing is that these pods are also optionally supposed to be able to
    take, as opposed to eight passengers, they can take one automobile. ALICE: Mm. You can drive your Tesla Model Grimes into
    the thing, right? JUSTIN: Yes. LIAM: Ugh. ALICE: And, you can, I guess, drive back out,
    from the one on-ramp, along with everybody else who drove their Tesla off, 2.6 seconds
    before you. JUSTIN: Oh, that’s different, that’s the regular
    Loop, not the Hyperloop. LIAM: Don’t you feel foolish. ALICE: Ah, okay, I’m behind the Loops. JUSTIN: The regular Loop came after the Hyperloop,
    right. ALICE: Of course. JUSTIN: It’s very confusing. ALICE: It’s like the franchise, it’s like
    the horror movie franchise Cube. There’s Cube, and then there’s Cube 2: Hypercube. [laughter]
    LIAM: God. ALICE: I think there was also Cube 3, which
    I think they just called it Cubed, because of the 3? LIAM: Fair enough, I guess? JUSTIN: Ah, that’s clever. I like it. So anyway, this system is proclaimed to be
    cheaper to construct than high-speed rail, which it clearly is not. Elon Musk claimed it would be cheaper to buy
    a ticket for the Hyperloop than for high-speed rail, which it clearly is not, because of
    BASIC CAPACITY CONSTRAINTS. This concept has found a whole shitload of
    investment capital, has a lot of private companies pursuing the idea. ALICE: Listen, once again, listen to Trashfuture
    for an understanding of why our financial system works this way, but suffice it to say,
    we have maybe, like, a year at most before the bill comes due on this [it was a month
    lol], and it’s gonna be *interesting*. JUSTIN: We now have the wonderful situation
    where governments are giving money to study Hyperloops. LIAM: UGGGGGH. JUSTIN: In Missouri, I believe, they just
    released several million dollars in tax credits for a potential Hyperloop that would go from-
    LIAM: Fucking stupid. ALICE: No. Other. Pressing. Issues. In. Missouri. JUSTIN: Obviously not. The main thing they want is a Hyperloop from
    Kansas City to St Louis. ALICE: Of course, of course. I’m just looking here at, like, ‘list of US
    territories by educational attainment,’ and finding Missouri down here, in like, the mid
    to bottom tier, and being like, you could build… maybe some schools, or something? Um, or. Or, you could have your Hyperloop. JUSTIN: You can get like six guys with shovels,
    and like a weekend, and you could shave probably two or three hours off of the existing Amtrak
    train that runs between St Louis and Kansas City. But what do I know? [laughter]
    ALICE: But those six guys with shovels aren’t cool, is the thing. And Elon Musk is cool. And if you don’t think he’s cool, you’re,
    y’know, a nerd. JUSTIN: And we can’t convince Elon Musk to
    pick up a shovel and do any work, obviously. ALICE: God, no. JUSTIN: Yeah, so, we got government agencies
    doing studies into Hyperloop, and of course, this entire thing is a grift and sort of a
    thing to prevent any actual investment into public transportation that works, cause Elon
    Musk wants to sell more cars. LIAM: [anger noise]
    JUSTIN: Yeah, Hyperloop is dumb. I will go into this in more detail at some
    point, I’m sure. LIAM: YOU HAVE A WHOLE VIDEO ABOUT IT. ALICE: You have a video going into… yes. JUSTIN: No, that’s about the regular Loop. ALICE: Oh, for fuck’s sake! We cannot keep our Loops… JUSTIN: There’s the regular Loop and the Hyperloop. The Hyperloop is the one that runs in a vacuum,
    ish. The regular Loop is the one that moves cars
    under cities. It’s… I can’t keep these ideas straight either. LIAM: All of them are dumb. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yes. JUSTIN: Here’s something which is surprising,
    though, which is that the original atmospheric railway concept has come back. So this is something called Aeromovel. This is a modern atmospheric railway system
    that came out of Brazil. I can’t get any good information as to how
    exactly it works, because the website was entirely in Portuguese…
    [laughter] JUSTIN: And also it looked like it came out
    of, um, like 1998. ALICE: We’re gonna get a bunch of YouTube
    comments featuring the word ‘caralho’ now. So, looking forward to that. I’m assuming the concrete bit underneath the
    train and the rail that it’s riding on contains the tube? JUSTIN: Yes, and you can also see this ducting
    here, which I also assume assists it in some way. This is installed in only a couple of locations,
    um, which, I believe this one is at a theme park in Jakarta, in Indonesia. But this is a modern atmospheric railway that
    exists. ALICE: I guess it’s a lot easier when you
    have continuous, more or less uninterruptible ways of generating that power, and doing that
    work to create the vacuum than, the, like, building full of horse guts? JUSTIN: Yes. [laughter]
    ALICE: You can use, like, I don’t know, nuclear power, or any number of things. And so I guess it’s not that weird now, it’s
    just inefficient? Which I guess you don’t mind for the novelty
    on a theme park thing. JUSTIN: I think there’s also one that’s an
    airport people mover. ALICE: Ah. Why is it always airports and theme parks
    where you do these fucking novel things? Glasgow Airport is getting individual people-moving
    pods, after having cancelled a railway link because it was too expensive. LIAM: Jesus fuck. JUSTIN: Like the fuckin’ PRT in Heathrow? ALICE: Yes! LIAM: Fuuuuuuuuuuck. ALICE: They’re gonna put in… JUSTIN: [anger noise]
    ALICE: They were gonna put in a tram line, and then they decided they were gonna stop
    the tram line halfway. LIAM: Nope, fuck that, that’s crazy. ALICE: You have to get the tram to Paisley,
    which is the nearest city south of Glasgow, and then change to a PRT, that takes you in
    your personal little private wanky pod, to the airport. Because I think it’s the largest airport in
    the UK that you can only reach by road, right now? JUSTIN: Oh my God. ALICE: I know, it sucks so bad. It’s got a decent bus there, but like, we
    almost invested in the rail link, to the point where there is Train Simulator DLC of it,
    because they made it as driver training, and then they cancelled it. JUSTIN: Oh my God. ALICE: So cool. JUSTIN: Just build a fuckin’ train. ALICE: Build, build, rebuild the Glasgow Airport
    Rail Link. JUSTIN: So we came full circle. There’s still an atmospheric railway in operation. There’s a new, modern atmospheric railway. And if you wanna learn more about it… learn
    Portuguese. [laughter]
    ALICE: Yeah, I’m gonna learn Portuguese to… we have to conduct a rat audit of this system. Uh, we need to, like, determine the extent
    of their rat problem. We need to see if there’s an Indonesian guy
    who has to, like, sweep all of the rats out, and give him our support. JUSTIN: “I’m the guy who wipes down the rat
    guts.” LIAM: Rat smoothies are good protein, I don’t
    know what your problem is. [laughter]
    ALICE: Rat Juicero. [laughter]
    LIAM: That’s an engineering success! ALICE: You know you can just squeeze the rat
    with your hands. [laughter]
    LIAM: Yeah, but this is more theatrical, and therefore better. JUSTIN: I feel like it might start biting
    me. [laughter]
    ALICE: You just get two big plates, it’s easy. Yeah. JUSTIN: “Welcome to the hydraulic press channel!”
    [laughter] ALICE: Instantly kicked off of YouTube for
    their rat episode. And before they could even release the horse
    one! [laughter]
    JUSTIN: We came full circle. Next episode’ll be about the Tacoma Narrows
    Bridge disaster. LIAM: Oh, finally. JUSTIN: Yep. I guess, uh, does anyone have any commercials? ALICE: Uhhh, no, I did mine up front. JUSTIN: Ah, very nice. You can follow me on the Twitter @donoteat02. LIAM: HA. JUSTIN: Because I was tragically killed recently. So this is my from beyond the grave account. I also wanna say, shout out to @bigmoodenergy
    on Twitter, who is doing a YouTube series called ‘The Failure and Success of Great American
    Transit,’ which is a Cities: Skylines series sort of like mine, which, y’know, is talking
    about real life urban issues. She’s focusing primarily on public transportation,
    uh, it’s very good, she just released the first episode, everyone should go check it
    out if you enjoy the stuff I do. Also the stuff I do is still going on. I’ve gotten a whole bunch of-
    ALICE: Did you model that lion yet? JUSTIN: Oh my God. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: No, I still need to do something about that, I’m not looking forward to it. I’ve, I’m close enough to where I’m gonna
    have all the models in-game probably by the end of next week. I hope. Or the end of this week. ALICE: Oh, some good Well There’s Your Problem
    news. Our art, for our forthcoming shirt, which
    you’ll be able to wear on your human body, is done. LIAM: YAAAAAY
    ALICE: We are just now, we have only to bully Justin into talking to the union printer guy. LIAM: Talk to the union printer guy. Please. JUSTIN: Yeah. ALICE: And then, hopefully, we will have a
    shirt, for you to, like, cover your nakedness with. JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: It’s very good. We’re very excited for it. JUSTIN: You can finally cover your shame. ALICE: You won’t keep getting kicked out of
    restaurants now for not wearing a shirt, because you’ll have a shirt! JUSTIN: Yes. ALICE: It is a joke that will only make sense
    to you if you subscribe to the Patreon, so you should do that too. Do that now. JUSTIN: I was about to say, yeah, subscribe
    to the Patreon and listen to the van episode. Then you’ll want to buy a shirt. LIAM: And you’ll also understand what the
    hell we’re talking about. [laughter]
    LIAM: Maybe. JUSTIN: Yeah, this is true. Yeah, and if you don’t want a shirt, you can
    cut the sleeves off, and then it’s a tank top. LIAM: That’s actually what I’m gonna do. That’s what I’m gonna do. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: That’s kind of appropriate for the artwork on there. LIAM: Yeah, exactly. It’s scumbag season, bud. ALICE: Yeah, for sure. It pairs so well with, like… well, an Eagles
    cap, for one. LIAM: Go birds. ALICE: But also, like, cargo shorts, go birds. LIAM: No. I do not wear cargo shorts, I just wear gym
    shorts, I wear basketball shorts, despite not being very athletic. [laughter]
    LIAM: I am an expert on this. ALICE: What’s the shoe situation with that
    shirt like, do you think? LIAM: I’m wearing Sperrys right now because
    I’m a class traitor. JUSTIN: Just wear boat shoes. [laughter]
    LIAM: Yeah. Leave me alone. ALICE: How come they make boat shoes but no
    train shoes? And how come you, uh, drive on the parkway,
    and you park in the driveway? JUSTIN: [groan]
    ALICE: What’s the deal with airline food? JUSTIN: These questions and more should be
    answered in a future bonus episode. [laughter]
    [long pause] ALICE: Well, goodbye. [laughter]
    LIAM: Awkward silence! JUSTIN: I was about to say, awkward silence. We probably won’t actually do that bonus episode. Alright. So. Uh, having done that I believe we are all
    done with doing podcasting, right? ALL: Yes. ALICE: Permanently. [laughter]
    JUSTIN: Okay. LIAM: That’s it, that’s it. Seventeen episodes. We had a good run. ALICE: We nailed it, yeah. JUSTIN: Bye everyone, forever. LIAM: Bye everybody. [laughter]

    CallConnect – How to Track Your Bus
    Articles, Blog

    CallConnect – How to Track Your Bus

    April 8, 2020


    Welcome to CallConnect! CallConnect is a unique rural bus service that responds to your requests. When you’ve made a booking on a CallConnect bus you can track the progress of your service using either your desktop or mobile. As a registered CallConnect member, simply click on the Book, Check, Cancel button on the website which will direct you to the login page. here you can enter your account details as covered in our ‘make a booking’ film. Simply choose ‘my bookings’, followed by ‘view my single trips’ and you’ll be shown a list of your booked and pending bus journeys. You can find the details of your booking request by clicking the orange details button. If your pick-up time is within one hour you can track the location of your bus simply by clicking on ‘wheres my service’. You will then be presented with a Google map and a vehicle symbol together with the status of your bus which is shown at the top of the screen. The message will display as ‘on time’ or a delay shown in minutes If you see the message ‘status unknown’ This means your bus is without on-board tracking equipment or has no GPRS signal. If you’re on your smartphone, login to the OpenDRT website and head to ‘my bookings’ then select ‘where is my next booking?’ As with the desktop site you will see the status of your bus on Google Maps. This feature is especially useful when you’re out and about and want to check whether your bus is
    running on time. For more information on our OpenDRT booking portal please go to the help pages on our website at www.lincsinterconnect.com or call 0345 2343344 and select option 3 followed by 3