Browsing Tag: light rail

    The Future of Rapid Transit in Portland
    Articles, Blog

    The Future of Rapid Transit in Portland

    April 1, 2020


    Hey guys, welcome back to the channel! Since
    you all enjoyed our recent videos on Seattle and Vancouver, we’re travelling down the
    west coast yet again to complete the Pacific Northwest Trifecta, and checking out the past,
    present, and future of rapid transit in Portland, Oregon. Portland is the largest and most populous
    city in the state of Oregon, and with around 3 million residents in the Portland metropolitan
    area, the region needs a great transit system to transport its residents safely to every
    corner of the area. Let’s get started! [Intro] Before we get to the video, we want to give
    a quick shoutout to our newest patrons Raymond and Gregory. Thanks so much for your support!
    Supporting us on Patreon is the best way to help us keep bringing new content to you guys
    frequently, and you’ll also be able to access our exclusive community Discord server for
    a direct channel of communication to us. You can also support us by giving a one-time donation,
    which you can do through our Ko-fi page. And furthermore, we wanted to quickly remind
    everyone to practice social distancing in this difficult time, please stay home and
    keep yourself and your community safe. Alright, time to get back to the main content
    of the day. We’ll first take a look at the intercity
    rail services available here in Portland. Amtrak provides somewhat limited service to
    the city’s Union Station, an intermodal transit hub in the Old Town Chinatown area
    of the city, on the west bank of the Willamette river. Three Amtrak lines pass through the
    city: Cascades, which runs from Vancouver, British Columbia down to Eugene, Oregon; Coast
    Starlight, which runs from Seattle down to Los Angeles; as well as the Empire Builder,
    which runs from Portland over to Chicago. These services may not be the most frequent,
    but there is also a well-connected intercity bus network, offering services to nearby cities
    in the region. The public transit here in the Portland metropolitan
    area is managed by TriMet. Short for the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon,
    the agency was formed in 1969 to replace existing bus companies in the region, and has since
    grown to have 85 bus lines, 5 light rail lines, and one commuter rail line. The different
    systems serve more than 300 thousand riders daily, and although ridership growth has slowed
    down in the recent years, there’s still lots of extensions planned for the systems
    that will connect more and more people within the region. We’ll start by looking at the
    lines currently in the system. First up is WES Commuter Rail. Short for Westside
    Express Service, this is the lone commuter rail service in the region, serving a north-south
    corridor parallel to Oregon Highway 217 and Interstate 5. The line has 5 stations along
    its 14.7 mile, or 23.7 kilometer route, with termini located in Beaverton and Wilsonville,
    and it receives a very modest number of riders at around 1600 daily. Riders are able to transfer
    onto Portland’s light rail system at Beaverton, while bus routes and parking facilities are
    available at other stations. Speaking of light rail, it’s finally time
    to talk about the highlight of rapid transit here in Portland, the MAX Light Rail system.
    First opened in 1986, the system started from one single line and has now developed into
    5 whole lines of light rail service, with around 95 stations in total, and 59.7 miles,
    or 96.1 kilometers of trackage, serving more than 120 thousand riders per day. Many of
    the lines do overlap in the centre of the city, especially near Pioneer Square, the
    centre of the system, as well as the Portland Transit Mall, a transit-priority corridor
    that serves light rail and buses. The first line in the system to be built was
    the Blue Line, a 33 mile, or 53 kilometer long line that cuts across the region horizontally.
    This line is definitely one of the main services of the system, with its 49 stations serving
    more than 55000 riders daily, as well as connecting nearby cities and neighbourhoods of Hillsboro,
    Beaverton, and Gresham, with a transfer at Beaverton Transit Centre to the WES commuter
    rail line. The next line that started service is the
    Red Line, which shares a lot of its tracks with the Blue Line, although diverting north
    at Gateway Transit Center to travel to Portland International
    Airport in an odd single tracked looping route. Opened in 2001, this route has 26 stations,
    with 5.5 miles, or 8.9 kilometers of extra trackage for the airport segment, and it serves
    around 22500 passengers daily. Next up, we have the Yellow Line, which runs
    down the middle of the city through the Transit Mall. Opened in 2004, this line has 14 stations,
    and it serves about 13000 passengers daily, connecting Portland State University through
    downtown to the Expo Center. The next line we’ll look at shares trackage
    with the yellow line, the red line, and the blue line. The Green line is shaped like a
    U, and it diverts from the red and blue line trackage to head south, terminating at Clackamas
    Town Center. The line has 30 stations over 15 miles, or 24.1 kilometers of track, and
    serves more than 20000 riders daily. Finally, we have the Orange Line. This line
    extends further south from where the yellow line terminates, lengthening service from
    downtown Portland to the city of Milwaukie. This is the newest line in the system opened
    in 2015, with 7.5 miles and 11.7 kilometers of track and 17 stations serving around 12000
    riders daily. The Orange Line also shares a major transit only bridge called the Tillicum
    crossing with the Portland streetcar in a very interesting service pattern. Alright, so these are the current rail rapid
    transit services owned and operated by TriMet in the Portland area. We’ll now move onto
    taking a look at the future extensions these systems are getting, so you guys will be able
    to get an idea of what’s to come in the near future. First up, we’ll take a look at a possible
    extension of the WES commuter rail line down to Salem. There’s been a few proposals to
    extend the service along existing P&W tracks down to Salem in order to help with congestion
    along the I-5, but due to the low ridership of the line, none of these proposals were
    able to be passed and actually put on the roadmap. Salem is the second-largest city
    in Oregon, and this extension will no doubt help increase ridership of the line and help
    spur transit-oriented development along the route, but unfortunately it doesn’t seem
    to be happening anytime soon despite the persistent lobbying from Rep. Mitch Greenlick. Hats off
    to you, Mr. Greenlick. Now, we’ll move onto looking at the future
    of the MAX system. Although none of the extensions we will be talking about are currently under
    construction, a few of them are already underway in being designed and studied, with the rest
    on the table as proposals. As the MAX system is used quite extensively, the case for expansion
    of the system is strong, and we look forward to seeing all of these implemented in the
    future in some form or another. The first expansion project we’ll look at
    is the Red Line Improvements project. This project will extend the red line along the
    current blue line trackage all the way west to Hillsboro, so that a fast rail link can
    be created between the airports in the two cities. Existing parts of the route on the
    Portland Airport branch that are currently single-tracked are also getting a second track
    to help with more ridership growth, and TriMet is planning to purchase up to 8 more light
    rail vehicles to accommodate that along with increased frequency. The project is currently
    in the preliminary design stage, and the expected completion date is 2023 to 2024. Next up, we have the Southwest Corridor project,
    an extension to the Green Line. This 12 mile, or 19 kilometer extension will bring the green
    line from its western terminus southwest to connect with WES at Tigard station, and then
    turning to terminate at Bridgeport Village, with 12 new stations added to the route. Although
    there is still a shortfall in the budget, a new budget measure will be voted on this
    year to cover that gap, and if approved the extension could open as early as 2027. The next project currently in the works is
    the Downtown Tunnel project. This project aims to convert the current at-grade corridor
    between Goose Hollow and Lloyd Center into a tunnel, in order to facilitate a grade separated
    fast rail connection through downtown, as well as to provide a much better solution
    to cross the Willamette river than the current 100-year old steel bridge. The exact routing
    of the project has not been determined, but it will be around 3.5 miles, or 5.6 kilometers
    long, and it’ll cost around 4 billion dollars. Currently, the project is still at the feasibility
    study stage, but we think this is a really important project for the city, as it’ll
    cut down travel times, improve ridership, and bring more possibilities of growth to
    the system as well as giving trains more options to get through the congested core of the city
    where trains currently hum along at a charming pace. There’s also quite a few other extensions
    that have been proposed, but these have not been put on the schedule to be developed just
    yet, and we’re not sure if they’ll be light rail or some other form of transit such
    as bus rapid transit. Nonetheless, these will be valuable additions to the system, and we
    hope to see them sometime in the future. These other extensions will connect forest Grove,
    Oregon City, Bridgeport Village, Hillsboro, and Vancouver Washington to the system. Alright, so this is what the future of the
    TriMet rail rapid transit systems will look like. Lots of improved connectivity in the
    works right now, with even more potentially coming in the future. The next part of this video will focus on
    more local rail transit within the city of Portland itself, namely the Portland Streetcar.
    Owned by the city of Portland and managed by TriMet, the streetcar system serves the
    city centre as a more local and lighter alternative to MAX. There are three different routes in
    the system, namely the A Loop, B Loop, and the North-South Line, and they have served
    the areas surrounding downtown Portland since 2001. The Portland Streetcar is by far the largest new streetcar system in the US. That being said though, it does pale in comparison to our favourite streetcar system. The two loop lines combine to become a circle
    line, with the A loop travelling clockwise and the B loop travelling counterclockwise,
    surrounding the urban core of Portland and connecting the neighbourhoods of Pearl District,
    South Waterfront, and Lloyd District. This service is roughly 4.4 miles, or 7.1 kilometers
    long, serving 52 stations along the way, and around 3500 riders daily for each direction.
    The Portland streetcar is by far the largest new streetcar system in the US. That being
    said the system pales in comparison to our favorite streetcar system. The other line is the north south line, which
    travels along the western border of the loop service, heading a bit further to Northwest
    23rd & Marshall as well as Southwest Lowell & Bond at either end. With 39 stations on
    the route over 4 miles or 6.4 kilometers of track, the line serves around 9000 riders
    daily, with the numbers slowly rising. And finally, one last bit of rapid transit
    in Portland is the Aerial Tram. One of only two commuter aerial tramways in the whole
    country, this cute little aerial tram service connects the Oregon Health and Science University
    campus with the south waterfront, where riders can connect with the North South Line of the
    streetcar to their final destinations. Opened in 2006, the service receives nearly 10000
    riders every weekday, and a ride will take about 3 minutes over 3300 feet or 1 kilometer
    of horizontal distance, and 500 feet or 152 meters of vertical distance. A very similar
    connection is proposed in Vancouver British Columbia for Simon Fraser University. We’ll now take a look at the extensions
    coming to the streetcar system, as our final topic in this video. These are more for the
    longer term and nothing is in stone yet, but it’s still exciting to see what could be
    coming to the streetcar system in the future. The first project in the works right now is
    the Lake Oswego project. This project has been considered since 2004, and would have
    extended the streetcar south by 6 miles or 10 kilometers, but unfortunately the city
    officials in Lake Oswego ended up changing their mind about the extension, and the project
    was officially shelved in 2012. The project would have had 10 or 11 stations, and would
    have terminated near a shopping center at N State Street and North Shore Blvd. Hopefully,
    with some more time, the city would change its mind and we’ll see the extension officially
    happening. Next up, we have an extension to Montgomery
    Park in Northwest Industrial District, west of the northern terminus on the river shore.
    Currently, two different alignments have been proposed, and the Federal Transit Administration
    has recently approved a one million dollar fund to continue studies into the extension. And finally, the last possible project in
    the works is the Hollywood District project. This project will extend the streetcar system
    into the Hollywood District in Northeast Portland, just east of where the system currently reaches
    at the north end. This probably won’t materialize for a while, but will be a worthwhile addition
    to the system, extending service to a busy neighbourhood of the city. Alright guys, so this is what the future of
    rail rapid transit in Portland looks like. Portland’s current systems are already quite
    good in serving different parts of the city, and we can’t wait to see where it’ll be
    able to reach in the future, with perhaps even more commuter rail possibilities as well. Like, subscribe, and comment down below to
    tell us what you are most excited for in Portland’s transit future. Follow us on twitter and Instagram,
    and support us on Patreon and Ko-fi if you would like to help us keep making great videos
    for you guys. Thanks for watching, and we’ll see you in the next one! [Music]

    Expo Line Tour: Culver City to Santa Monica (Phase 2)
    Articles, Blog

    Expo Line Tour: Culver City to Santa Monica (Phase 2)

    March 31, 2020


    Alright, so welcome everybody to the Expo Line Phase 2 Extension to Santa Monica We will be departing in just a bit. Our first station stop on the new extension will be Palms Station. A little bit about the Expo Line. The Expo Line is actually the first major project that was funded by Measure R money. So Measure R, for those of you may not remember, was a ballot measure from the 2008 general election that passed. So, we passed Measure R back in 2008 and now you’re seeing the first of the projects from that money coming to fruition. The trains will be running every 12 minutes from beginning of service until 8 o’clock. After 8 o’clock they will be running every 20 minutes. Woohoo! So we’re on now, we’re officially on the extension now. This is all new rail. And again our first station stop will be Palms Station. I will be doing a little bit of talking, but please enjoy the view. Look out the window. There’s some trash here on the left. Please don’t let that discourage you. They are cleaning it up. You’ll see how close it gets to that wall, so… a very good engineering team made it happen. Wasn’t that the same at the pass at Overland? Uh, Pico? National? That I know of this is the only one. The 405. Oh yeah. So yeah. So, you see how close these walls get. Woah! There’s very little room for error in this tunnel. And again, this is an existing trench that was created for the old Red Car that went out of service over 63 years ago. Alright, so now we’re arrive at Westwood/Rancho Park Station. This station will not have any parking. Over here to the left we have Little Osaka, also known as Sawtelle’s Japan Town. So, a lot of Japanese restaurants and shops just over here to the north. A lot of really good eateries. So, now we’re crossing the infamous 405 Freeway. Oooh! That was like 3 inches! We’re almost at the Santa Monica border at this point. Did Measure R money go to doing the parallel bike path? I’m pretty sure. It was part of the project, then yes. It was pulled from the same funds. Like I said there’s a segment in Culver City that connects Phase 1 to Phase 2 That they haven’t yet decided the route they are going to take. How does the payment work with the parking with TAP card? Yeah, so there will be an actual person at the parking lot entrance checking TAP cards. And the reason they’re starting this is cause a lot of stations that were highest in demand a lot of non-transit riders were parking their cars there and leaving them all day. And so as we leave now Expo/Bundy we’re actually going to pass the maintenance facility for the Expo Line which will be on your lefthand side. Ooooh! There’s where the trains go to sleep at night. [Laughter] And you tuck them in… And we’re actually going to switch operators here so you’re not going to zoom past it like you normally would. That is not Metro parking. That belongs to the Bergamot galleries. That is their private parking lot, so please do not park there. It’s speed will be restricted. It can only go as fast as the traffic that is next to it. Both on it’s left and it’s right. So you’ll notice we’re going to kinda just do like a little s-curve onto the street. At this point, like I said, the train will go a little bit slower. And it runs kind of like a streetcar like a bit of a trolly going down the street. Alright, so that brings us to our next station stop. This is 17th Street/Santa Monica College Station There’s also bike sharing and bike lockers at this station. It is a half-mile walk or bike ride to the SMC. Alright, so we’re now approaching the end of the line which is Downtown Santa Monica which is on Colorado. We’re coming up on Lincoln! Big Blue Bus on your left! Also, right across the street is the Santa Monica mall. and the Santa Monica Promenade, so all of that is literally just steps away from the station platform. And again, please exit the train so we can go back around. This trail will actually go back into service so we will have to exit. All of us. And take your stuff? Yes, please make sure you have all your belongings with you. This train will go back into service.

    Houston Metro Rail Various Dates
    Articles, Blog

    Houston Metro Rail Various Dates

    March 23, 2020


    Fulton at Hays Streets Having explain my hobby to a guy at Moody Park. He seemed the friendly sort. Arriving at Lindale Park Station The second towering bridge on the Northline, this one over the BNSF, formerly the Fort Worth & Denver Fulton and Theron Streets Purple Line car Central Station Rusk MLK & Stuyvestant Lane MLK Blvd. and Cortelyou Lane The Shrine of the Black Madonna heading toward Old Spanish Trail and MLK/Mac Gregor Park Station MLK and Arvilla Lane headed toward Old Spanish Trail and MLK/Mac Gregor Park Station This operator is having trouble with the track switching. This is more than just teething, As Josef Stalin said, “It was worse than a crime. It was a mistake.” Alongside Wheeler Avenue at Rockwood Drive. The University off Houston is behind me. Purple Line train alongside Wheeler having just crossed Cullen Blvd. Texas Southern University/University of Houston athletics complex. Purple Line train leaving MLK/Mac Gregor Park Station southbound. Purple Line Scott at Anita Purple Line on Scott at Coyle. Purple Line Leeland/Third Ward Station EaDo (Short for east downtown)/Stadium station Green Line Train Purple Line train crossing Emancipation (There is a Wokester name for you) along Texas Avenue Green Line crossing the former Dowling Avenue (named after some Confederate Lieutenant) while wokesterism denies our history. Another Purple Line train crossing ahem! Emancipation Way Harrisburg used to be a four-lane street. Metro expropriated two lanes for their cut under the Houston, Belt & Terminal RR Houston paves their rights of way to give access to repair vehicles. Harrisburg and Velasco Street Coffee Plant.Second Ward Station Leaving Lockwood/Eastwood Station easrbound station Convention District Station Harrisburg UPRR overpass. They were going to build an underpass but found 30,000 gallons of subterranean gasoline, . The railroad crossing is now a hazardous waste site. That structure on the right is the right if the Shrine of the Black Madonna Private right of way east of downtown on the Purple Line. Harrisburg Blvd, ar Velasco Street Swinging from Texas onto Hamilton and thence to Capitol Red Line northbound at Mc Gowen Station Fulton and Canadian Streets Leaving Fulton and Cavalcade Convention District Station onto private right of way, Convention District Station up ahead. By now I am panting heavily From Convention District turning onto private right of way. Old Spanish Trail and MLK/Mac Gregor Park Station Scott Street at Polk southbound. Green Line Lockwood–Eastwood Station

    METRO RIDESPONSOR TESTIMONIAL VIDEO
    Articles, Blog

    METRO RIDESPONSOR TESTIMONIAL VIDEO

    February 16, 2020


    METRO Park and Ride service is a
    great way for commuters to relax and avoid the rigors of rush-hour traffic. Our mission is to make travel simple by connecting commuters with high quality bus service. That’s safe reliable and affordable. METRO offers 27 Park and Ride locations
    throughout the service area. Plus, 21 strategically placed transit
    centers provide convenient connections to even more destinations through
    our local bus and light rail network. To find the park and ride or transit center near
    you, just visit RideMETRO.org to get started. There’s a long list of benefits to riding METRO
    versus driving and saving money is right at the top. One thing I love about the METRO
    experience is the money that I save and the time that it gives me to think and follow up on personal tasks. One thing I really like about METRO that it is 100% ADA accessible. You can get in and out of the
    bus and the train in no time. I’ve been in public transit all of my life and coming to Houston, METRO buses and trains get me to where I need to go. According to AAA, the national average commute
    costs approximately nine thousand nine hundred dollars a year…which includes ownership
    costs, maintenance, fuel and parking. The cost to ride a METRO Park and Ride bus
    ranges between $2.50 and $4.50 per trip. Need to transfer to another bus or
    train to complete your trip? METRO offers free transfers good for up
    to three hours of travel in any direction. when paying with your Metro queue fare card. Saving money is great; however, riding METRO also gives you the opportunity to:
    Catch up on work. Send texts or emails. Or just relax and read on the way to work. Plus, every time you ride, that’s one less vehicle on our roadways, which translates to less congestion and
    improved air quality across the region. When I drive, there’s too much uncertainty
    whether it be a wreck on the freeway… What will I have to deal with? But, when I ride
    METRO, all I have to worry about is getting on and off the bus. METRO Park &Ride buses feature comfortable seats. Cool AC. Reading lights. and some vehicles come equipped with charging outlets for your mobile device. Riding Metro is not only great for getting to work,
    ut employers can also benefit like the ability to attract and maintain new talent. Employers can also offer a tax-free transit or vanpool subsidy of up to two hundred and sixty dollars a month Employers can learn more about becoming a Metro corporate commute partner by visiting RideMETRO.org or by contacting us at client.services
    at RideMETRO.org. At METRO, our goal is to keep Houston moving, but we can’t do it without you. METRO is safe. METRO is convenient. And, of course, they are affordable. Come on and make the change. Drive less and travel more. The Ride Way…on METRO. METRO is MY ride.

    METRO TRIP App – Bus Stop Tracker
    Articles, Blog

    METRO TRIP App – Bus Stop Tracker

    February 12, 2020


    This video will show you the Track Bus
    Stop feature. Without planning a trip, you can track a single bus stop and be
    notified when you’ve arrived at the proper place. Start out by clicking the
    route that’s related to that stop. Choose the route and the direction.
    The stop that is located closest to you is represented by a blue bus icon. This icon
    is larger than the other bus icons on the route. The route name also points to
    the selected stop. If this is the correct stop, click Track Bus Stop, or touch
    one of the other bus stops if it is not the correct stop once track bus stop is
    clicked confirm your choice. Now you are actively tracking the stop. A green
    radar icon will appear in the upper right hand corner of the app. Next, walk toward the
    tracked stop. You can follow your progress and locate yourself on the map
    by following the dark blue solid circle. A small blue arrow shows the
    direction that you are walking. When you’re approximately 1/3 of a block away from
    the stop, you’ll start to feel pulse vibrations. (PHONE VIBRATION SFX) These vibrations will intensify
    the closer you walk to the stop. A notification and alarm vibration
    will occur when you’ve reached your stop. (MULTIPLE PHONE VIBRATION SFX) You can then dismiss the
    notification or review the next arrivals.

    METRO TRIP App – First Time Running the App
    Articles, Blog

    METRO TRIP App – First Time Running the App

    February 8, 2020


    Welcome to the METRO Trip app. This video will show you many of the important features of the app the first time you run it. Start out by
    clicking the green METRO Trip app icon. After reviewing the quick tip screens
    you’ll then see the main screen. Starting from the top, you’ll see
    three lines that represent the menu icon. To the right are the search and
    plan a trip icons. Looking again to the left part of the screen, you’ll see
    multiple circles. These are bus routes. You can scroll up and down to see
    what routes are near your location. The blue icon in the upper right corner of the
    map is the center button. Click this icon to recenter the map on your location.
    Lastly, the dark blue solid circle located at the center of the larger circle
    shows your current location on the map. The small blue dots show the locations
    of the closest bus stops near you. Now, let’s set up the app. Click the
    menu icon to reveal the menu. Click the settings icon near the bottom of the menu. You’ll then be asked to set a notification. There are two kinds of notifications:
    pulse vibrations and background vibrations. If you have an older version of Android, you
    may not see background vibration option. Click the toggle on the right part of the
    menu to activate these features. Now, close the menu to activate these
    features and return to the main screen. Clicking one of the routes launches a pop-up
    which will ask what direction you’re traveling. Just choose your direction. Once you’ve
    selected your direction, the bus route is displayed as a black line. The bus stop closest to your location is shown as a large blue bus icon. with the stop name pointing at the stop. After the data has been sent to the
    app the live location of the buses on the route you chose will be revealed on
    the app. Green moving icons denote live buses. A gray bus icon represents a bus
    that is not reporting its location. These buses will move according
    to the schedule of the chosen route. The bottom portion of the map now shows
    the route name, its direction, the stop name, and the and the stop ID. You can the map as well as pinch and zoom. At the bottom of the app are the predicted At the bottom of the app are the predicted
    arrival times. Real-time predictions project the bus arrival time to within a
    five minute window. If the bus is not reporting, the time will be grayed over,
    denoting the scheduled arrival time. Pressing the up arrow in the lower right
    part of the app, displays the predictions in a clock like format. Another major
    feature is the plan a trip. Click the plan a trip icon in the top right hand
    corner of the app — its shaped like an arrow. If you’re planning a trip from
    your current location, just enter your destination address on
    the To line. Now pick your destination from the drop-down. Click the three
    vertical dots to change when you want to leave. Or just go straight to the itineraries down below. Once you’ve chosen your itinerary, clicking
    the up arrow shows more of the trip. If you’ve turned on pulse vibrations, the track
    itinerary button will also appear. Click the track itinerary button and confirm tracking. A green radar icon will now appear on the screen to show the actively tracked trip. Clicking the track itinerary
    once more, enables you to cancel the tracking.

    A Hiring Event and a New App Among T2050 Light Rail Updates – City Update
    Articles, Blog

    A Hiring Event and a New App Among T2050 Light Rail Updates – City Update

    February 7, 2020


    [SHOW THEME MUSIC]>>HELLO, AND WELCOME TO ANOTHER
    “CITY UPDATE.” I’M DEBORAH SEDILLO DUGAN. WE ARE HERE IN THE DOWNTOWN
    AREA, RIGHT HERE IN THE HEART OF PHOENIX. I’M HERE WITH MARKUS COLEMAN. HE IS A LIGHT-RAIL
    ADMINISTRATOR. WE ARE GOING TO GET AN UPDATE ON
    WHAT’S GOING ON WITH LIGHT RAIL. NICE SEEING YOU.>>IT’S NICE TO SEE YOU AGAIN
    AS WELL.>>I LOVE THE DOWNTOWN AREA. LIGHT RAIL IS HAPPENING. RIDERS ARE HAPPENING. ASU DOWNTOWN,
    IT’S A BUSTLING AREA.>>WE HAVE A LOT GOING ON
    RIGHT NOW.>>SO LET’S TALK ABOUT 2050,
    TRANSIT 2050, BIG PICTURE. LOT OF VOTERS VOTED FOR THIS.>>BIG PICTURE, I WOULD SAY THE
    THING THAT PEOPLE NEED TO REALIZE, AND WE KEEP CLOSE TO
    THE CHEST, IS THAT IN 2015, TAX WENT OUT TO THE VOTERS. VOTERS CAME OUT AND
    SUPPORTED TRANSIT. AND NOT ONLY SUPPORTED TRANSIT
    IN A WAY OF SAYING 7/10THS OF A CENT, BUT SUPPORTED TRANSIT
    TO MAKE SURE THAT WE’RE INCREASING SERVICES. INCREASING THE WAY THAT
    WE’RE PROVIDING TRANSIT TO THE COMMUNITY. AND ALSO INCREASING THE WAY THAT
    WE’RE LISTENING AND HEARING AND ENGAGING WITH THE COMMUNITY. AND SO THAT MEANS THAT WE’VE
    BEEN ABLE TO LOOK AT OUR INCREASE OF OUR BUS SERVICE, OUR
    INCREASE TO OUR RAIL SERVICE, AND ALSO BRINGING ON NEW SERVICE
    THAT’S GOING TO BE NEW TO THE VALLEY, WHICH IS OUR
    BUS RAPID TRANSIT, BRT SERVICE.>>I LOVE IT, AND YOU KNOW
    I’M A RAPID — I LOVE IT. I LOVE THE COMFORT OF THE RAPID
    AND GETTING TO AND FROM WORK. SO WITH THIS 2050, TRANSIT 2050,
    THERE ARE SOME EXTENSIONS GOING ON, TOO, FOR NORTHEAST,
    SOUTH CENTRAL. TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THAT.>>SO WE ACTUALLY HAVE THREE
    EXTENSIONS THAT ARE RIGHT NOW CURRENTLY PART OF THE PROJECT
    PILOT PROGRAM. AND ONE OF THE PROJECTS IS THE
    SOUTH CENTRAL EXTENSION. SOUTH CENTRAL EXTENSION IS ABOUT
    FIVE AND A HALF MILES. IT STARTS IN DOWNTOWN PHOENIX. HEADS DOWN THE CENTRAL ALIGNMENT
    ALL THE WAY TO BASELINE ROAD. THAT’S WHERE THE TERMINUS IS. THAT EXTENSION WILL ALSO INCLUDE
    A DOWNTOWN HUB STATION. IT HAS APPROXIMATELY 18 LOCAL
    ARTISTS, 14 OF THEM — WITH 18 ARTISTS TOTAL, 14 OF THEM
    WHICH ARE LOCAL. THAT WAS REALLY A BIG KEY FOR US
    TO MAKE SURE WE HAVE THAT LOCAL IMPACT TO THE PROJECT. AS WELL AS WE’VE PARTNERED WITH
    KIEWIT, WHO IS OUR CONTRACTOR ON THE PROJECT, TO MAKE SURE THAT
    WE HAVE SOME OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOCAL RESIDENCE ALONG
    THE ALIGNMENT. AS WELL THEN WE HAVE OUR CAPITAL
    I-10 PROJECT, WHICH IS A 10-MILE EXTENSION. THAT’S GOING TO BE DONE IN
    TWO PHASES CURRENTLY. THE FIRST PHASE GIVES US FROM
    DOWNTOWN TO THE CAPITAL. THEN FROM THE CAPITAL, IT WILL
    FOLLOW THE I-10 ALIGNMENT ALL THE WAY OUT TO 79TH AVENUE.>>WOW, WAY OUT WEST. IT’S ALMOST TO CALIFORNIA. THAT’S GREAT.>>NORTHWEST EXTENSION PHASE 2
    IS A PROJECT THAT WILL START FROM 19TH AVENUE AND DUNLAP,
    EXTENDING OVER TO METRO CENTER MALL. AND WE’RE REALLY EXCITED ABOUT
    THIS, BECAUSE THIS WOULD BE THE FIRST TIME THEY’RE GOING TO HAVE
    AN ELEVATED BRIDGE GOING OVER THE I-17 FREEWAY,
    WITH THE TERMINUS BEING IN METRO CENTER MALL. THIS IS GOING TO ALLOW US TO
    EXTEND THAT 19TH AVENUE AND DUNLAP LOCATION ALL THE WAY OVER
    TO THE MALL, MAKING SURE THAT WE HAVE A SEAMLESS CONNECTION FROM
    METRO CENTER ALL THE WAY TO DOWNTOWN PHOENIX.>>WELL, AFTER ALL, FOLKS,
    WE ARE THE FIFTH LARGEST CITY IN THE COUNTRY, AND THIS IS
    LIFE IN THE BIG CITY. TRANSPORTATION IS KEY. SO THE COMMUNITY KNOWS
    THIS IS ALL HAPPENING. TALK ABOUT COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
    AND HOW PEOPLE, IF THEY HAVE QUESTIONS OR NEED TO GET MORE
    INVOLVED, AND WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THEIR HOOD.>>SO ACTUALLY WE’VE BEEN REALLY
    FOCUSED, AND OUR COUNCIL AND OUR PARTNERS AT VALLEY METRO HAVE
    BEEN REALLY FOCUSED ON THE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PIECE OF
    ALL THREE OF THE PROJECTS. REALLY MAKING SURE THAT WE
    GET THAT MESSAGE OUT TO THE COMMUNITY. THAT THEY’RE INVOLVED, THEY’RE
    ABLE TO GIVE THEIR FEEDBACK, AND THEY’RE ABLE TO GET PROJECT
    INFORMATION AS CLOSE TO REAL TIME AS POSSIBLE. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT VALLEY
    METRO HAS ACTUALLY BEEN ABLE TO DO WITH THE LAUNCH OF THE SOUTH
    CENTRAL PROJECT IS THIS PAST MONDAY, WE’VE LAUNCHED
    “CONSTRUCT VALLEY METRO.” IT’S THE APPLICATION THAT YOU
    CAN GET ON YOUR iPHONE. YOU CAN GET ON YOUR ANDROID. AND THAT APP WILL ALLOW YOU TO
    GET UP-TO-DATE NOTIFICATIONS. IT ALLOW YOU TO GET PROJECT
    INFORMATION THAT’S UP TO DATE. IT’LL ALSO LET YOU CUSTOMIZE
    SOME OF THE NOTIFICATION THAT YOU HAVE, AND GET REAL-TIME
    INFORMATION, AND ALSO GIVE FEEDBACK ON THE PROJECT.>>WOW, THAT’S GREAT,
    THAT’S EXCELLENT. EVERYTHING’S VERY INTERACTIVE
    FOR FOLKS. AND YOU CAN ALWAYS GO USE THE
    PUBLIC LIBRARY TO GET INFORMATION, OR A SENIOR CENTER,
    COMMUNITY CENTER. ALL THOSE PLACES HAVE COMPUTERS. I LOVE IT, THAT’S GREAT. YOU HAVE A JOB FAIR COMING UP,
    TOO. LET’S TALK ABOUT THAT, BECAUSE
    IT’S GOING TO OFFER A LOT OF POSITIONS AND JOBS
    FOR THE COMMUNITY.>>SO WE HAVE A JOB FAIR
    COMING UP FEBRUARY 11. AND WE PARTNER WITH ARIZONA AT
    WORK AND OUR CONTRACTOR KIEWIT TO MAKE SURE THAT WE CAN
    MAKE THIS HAPPEN. AND SO WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN IS
    WE’RE HAVING PEOPLE COME IN, BEING ABLE TO GET HELP WITH
    THEIR RESUMES RIGHT THERE ON THE SPOT. BEING ABLE TO MEET WITH THE
    CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS RIGHT THERE ON THE SPOT. BECAUSE WE’RE LOOKING, BETWEEN
    THE SOUTH CENTRAL PROJECT AND NORTHWEST EXTENSION PHASE 2,
    WE’RE LOOKING AT APPROXIMATELY 2,000 JOBS — 1,000 TO 2,000
    JOBS THAT WE’LL HAVE COMING ON BOARD IN CONSTRUCTION
    AND SKILL WORK. THEN SO WITH THAT, WE’RE
    EXPECTING AT LEAST 200 OF THOSE JOBS TO BE PEOPLE
    WHO ARE FIRST-TIME INTO CONSTRUCTION FIELDS.>>OH, THAT’S EXCELLENT. SO NOT ONLY WE’RE BRINGING
    TRANSIT AND MORE OF TRANSIT IN LIFE IN THE BIG CITY. WE’RE ALSO BRINGING MORE JOBS
    WITH THIS PROJECT. SO IF YOU WANT TO CHECK OUT THIS
    JOB FAIR, WE’RE PUTTING IT RIGHT HERE ON THE SCREEN TO FIND OUT
    HOW TO GO AND ATTEND TO IT. SO MARKUS, IT’S GREAT SEEING YOU
    AS ALWAYS. GREAT UPDATE ABOUT LIGHT RAIL. I’M SO EXCITED, BECAUSE I AM
    A TRANSIT USER, FOR SURE, FOR SURE.>>YOU SHOULD BE.>>ABSOLUTELY, I AM.>>EVERYONE OUT THERE SHOULD BE
    AS WELL.>>THAT’S RIGHT, THAT’S RIGHT. FOR “CITY UPDATE,”
    I’M DEBORAH SEDILLO DUGAN. PostCAP LLC
    postcapllc.com
    844-335-0911 [MUSIC]

    METRO Presents: Voices in My Commute
    Articles, Blog

    METRO Presents: Voices in My Commute

    February 5, 2020


    (RELAXING MUSIC PLAYS UNDER) (POOF SFX) Whaaaat? Pssst, Lisa. By riding METRO, you can save $10,000 a year. And avoid…this. Aww, c’mon man!! Recalculating…
    Your arrival time is 1.5 hours. (SIGH)
    Seriously? Seriously. (POOF SFX)
    Hey, Lisa. Let’s get you back on METRO.

    Streetcars and Metro Vancouver: Urban Planning History Explained
    Articles, Blog

    Streetcars and Metro Vancouver: Urban Planning History Explained

    January 29, 2020


    Vancouver was built around the streetcar. If you want to understand Vancouver you have to understand the streetcar. In its first 40 years Vancouver developed with surprisingly little government involvement. The Canadian Pacific Railway laid out and named its streets in a flexible grid pattern before the city government even existed. The streetcar company determined which streets would be major One of the great shapers of Metro Vancouver was Robert Horne-Payne, President of the BC Electric streetcar Company which he incorporated on Threadneedle Street in London London was the inspiration an unplanned City whose order arose incrementally from human actions not human design From his home and wheelchair in Brentwood England he personally made all major streetcar decisions, harnessing market forces to build the transportation and hydroelectric Infrastructure of the region. The 1880s changed world cities – first electric street lights then electric streetcars. In one week Vancouver got both an instant modern city The Marchetti Constant says a city area is limited by an average 1/2 hour commute Even great ancient cities only had a 2.5 kilometer walkable radius Streetcars tripled this to 7.5 kilometers The increase in area became the streetcar suburb requiring a new form of housing. In Europe the worst living was the ground-floor the best, the next floor up the Piano Nobile called the first floor in Britain and some Vancouver buildings With no elevators, the cheapest floor was the highest the opposite of today. Growing grass or gardens not food gave status The single detached house elevated with stairs was perfect for the 1890s. Almost all Vancouver houses were built On Spec that is by speculators. Horne-Payne offered discounted transit to populate the new neighborhoods.A healthy streetcar line needs a catchment area on both sides for maximum riders A line beside water or Park or close to another line will have reduced ridership Major streets were set just under one kilometer apart Homeowners on successful streetcar lines built stores on their front yards All our neighborhood shopping streets started this way Some of the original houses can still be seen today With zoning, conversions like this became illegal Streetcar extensions that developed after zoning have few stores Main Street has retail up to 33rd Avenue the original streetcar stop. On Fraser retail follows the original line to 51st Avenue. On Victoria North of Kingsway no streetcar no retail. South of Kingsway the shopping street ends at the old stop on 43rd Avenue Streets like Knight Cambie and Macdonald got transit after zoning and have almost no retail at all Retail prefers flat land Davie and Robson have few stores on their hill Commercial Drive had ample housing thus healthy retail but Venables went through a swampy area It became industrial The original geography of Vancouver can be discerned. Park school and industrial sites were often marshy areas not suitable for housing BC Electric powered homes and industries Horne-Payne switched from coal to hydroelectric by linking Coquitlam Lake to Buntzen Lake named after a company manager Then power stations on Indian arm He linked Alouette Lake to Stave Lake power and diverted the Bridge River for Seton Lake power Horne-Payne built a factory in New Westminster that produced hundreds of streetcars BC Electric’s focus on technology and experts influenced culture Its corporate headquarters was B C’s first modernist high-rise now a condominium Studies show BC Electric invested more and took less than most other city systems. Voters refused to purchase BC Electric believing government ownership would mean increased taxes. Indeed, after the Province nationalized BC Electric in 1961 tax payers have subsidized transit ever since Horne- Payne faced a boom and bust economy. The value of Vancouver building permits peaked 1913 and 1929 twenty million dollars plunging to two million dollars shortly after The gas powered automobile expanded the city radius to 20 km One landowner built the Lions Gate Bridge so car driving home buyers could reach his properties BC Electric shifted to gas buses although even today Electric trolley buses largely follow the original streetcar lines Vancouver’s expansion began with the Powell line to the original High Street Cordova, then Granville and Pender Westminster now Main Street crossed a company bridge the High Street then Granville and Pacific Over the Granville Bridge on Broadway seven trestles over streams Eventually the looping Fairview Beltway In New Westminster Columbia climbing to Queens Park to 6th and 6th the Central Park interurban line like Kingsway avoided crossing water by taking the highest route linking these isolated settlements initiating Metrotown and Collingwood leading South Vancouver and Burnaby to incorporate Hastings role strengthened. The Robson line opened the West End Stanley Park line by the all-important post office down Pender and Georgia The planned Bidwell line was changed to Denman then up Davie Main and Powell were extended BC Electric acquired the Kitsilano Trestle and a line serving industry on False Creek Main Street to 33rd to the Mountain View Cemetery and the rock quarries making possible the Queen Elizabeth Gardens A ferry bringing passengers to the North Shore was at the Inner Harbour,s widest slowest moving point Four times a day this large body of water rushed through the treacherous First Narrows at often ten times the speed Horne-Payne had wanted a rational line on 3rd Street but the region’s first public consultation process forced a substandard route The main line up Lonsdale another to Lynn Valley Horne-Payne purchased the forest up to the Capilano Suspension Bridge and gifted it as the park we enjoy today The Sockeye Express climbed around the Quilchena Park plain source of some of the world’s largest timber to a place it called, Kerrisdale Downtown Point Grey with a City Hall and now residential towers This line to Steveston led fishing and farming to flourish Georgia and Keefer, Broadway to Fraser Robson to Recreation Park The Royal Columbian British Columbia’s first hospital. A freight line to a brickyard led to the flatter Marpole Line for heavy goods from New Westminster on to Vancouver Fourth Avenue was the original line West to Alma giving its finer-grained retail Powell the original line to East Vancouver to the PNE entrance Hastings gained prominence with a line to -Boundary Road . A line went up Kingway then Fraser to 51st then Victoria to 43rd. Cordova linked to Granville. A bridge enabled the Fraser Valley line opening up new communities Lumber mills and farms flourished and BC Electric brought thousands of gallons of milk to Vancouver every day It avoided the massive but shallow Sumas Lake. The province built the Vedder Canal and drained the lake Chilliwack incorporated anticipating the arrival Broadway only went to Trafalgar the end of CPR property Main extended to 50th then 63rd Richards and Cambie to Hastings The Burnaby Lake Line is now the Trans Canada freeway. Its boulevard on First Avenue veered off at Nanaimo to join Commercial Drive First Avenue was never meant to be an arterial and still looks residential Powell to Venables on Commercial Kingsway to Joyce, Broadway to Commercial Granville to King Edward Main to the Marpole Line, Fraser to 59th Fourth up Alma to Tenth to Sasmat to Fourth later to Drummond 41st to Dunbar To the Fraser Mills the largest in Canada. A connector on Sixth Street a bridge over the Fraser to Queensborough The Highland Park cut off which is still used by the Expo Line today Granville to Oak on 33rd Oak to Broadway then Oak to Main on 16th The Connaught or Cambie Bridge linked to Robson Richards to Drake, Nanaimo to Broadway The east half of False Creek was filled from the Grandview Cut The Crown Bypass 16th to Dunbar 41st from Boulevard to Main Oak Street to Marpole Victoria to 54th Kingsway to Earles Hastings to Ellesmere. Fraser connected to Marine Drive The Powell line linked to Hastings and the PNE entrance moved though it still feels like the back door Granville Island streets follow the old BC Electric rails Broadway to Alma then the Dunbar bypass led Crown to close Horne- Payne cancelled the streetcar to Rupert Street and instituted Metro Vancouver’s first bus line Signaling the beginning of the end for streetcars BC Electric had expanded its network conservatively Many streetcar companies had gone broke and there was no government to bail them out Horne -Payne rarely approved extensions unless there were contributions by landowners and there was development already in the area He refused to get involved in land speculation or property development, focusing solely on the core business Because decisions were made in London.there was a buffer from public and political pressure Metro Vancouver was more compact because of BC Electric Robert Horne-Payne sold BC Electric and passed away Leaving a region that had grown organically through market forces with little government involvement