Browsing Tag: light rail

    METRO RIDESPONSOR TESTIMONIAL VIDEO
    Articles, Blog

    METRO RIDESPONSOR TESTIMONIAL VIDEO

    February 16, 2020


    METRO Park and Ride service is a
    great way for commuters to relax and avoid the rigors of rush-hour traffic. Our mission is to make travel simple by connecting commuters with high quality bus service. That’s safe reliable and affordable. METRO offers 27 Park and Ride locations
    throughout the service area. Plus, 21 strategically placed transit
    centers provide convenient connections to even more destinations through
    our local bus and light rail network. To find the park and ride or transit center near
    you, just visit RideMETRO.org to get started. There’s a long list of benefits to riding METRO
    versus driving and saving money is right at the top. One thing I love about the METRO
    experience is the money that I save and the time that it gives me to think and follow up on personal tasks. One thing I really like about METRO that it is 100% ADA accessible. You can get in and out of the
    bus and the train in no time. I’ve been in public transit all of my life and coming to Houston, METRO buses and trains get me to where I need to go. According to AAA, the national average commute
    costs approximately nine thousand nine hundred dollars a year…which includes ownership
    costs, maintenance, fuel and parking. The cost to ride a METRO Park and Ride bus
    ranges between $2.50 and $4.50 per trip. Need to transfer to another bus or
    train to complete your trip? METRO offers free transfers good for up
    to three hours of travel in any direction. when paying with your Metro queue fare card. Saving money is great; however, riding METRO also gives you the opportunity to:
    Catch up on work. Send texts or emails. Or just relax and read on the way to work. Plus, every time you ride, that’s one less vehicle on our roadways, which translates to less congestion and
    improved air quality across the region. When I drive, there’s too much uncertainty
    whether it be a wreck on the freeway… What will I have to deal with? But, when I ride
    METRO, all I have to worry about is getting on and off the bus. METRO Park &Ride buses feature comfortable seats. Cool AC. Reading lights. and some vehicles come equipped with charging outlets for your mobile device. Riding Metro is not only great for getting to work,
    ut employers can also benefit like the ability to attract and maintain new talent. Employers can also offer a tax-free transit or vanpool subsidy of up to two hundred and sixty dollars a month Employers can learn more about becoming a Metro corporate commute partner by visiting RideMETRO.org or by contacting us at client.services
    at RideMETRO.org. At METRO, our goal is to keep Houston moving, but we can’t do it without you. METRO is safe. METRO is convenient. And, of course, they are affordable. Come on and make the change. Drive less and travel more. The Ride Way…on METRO. METRO is MY ride.

    METRO TRIP App – Bus Stop Tracker
    Articles, Blog

    METRO TRIP App – Bus Stop Tracker

    February 12, 2020


    This video will show you the Track Bus
    Stop feature. Without planning a trip, you can track a single bus stop and be
    notified when you’ve arrived at the proper place. Start out by clicking the
    route that’s related to that stop. Choose the route and the direction.
    The stop that is located closest to you is represented by a blue bus icon. This icon
    is larger than the other bus icons on the route. The route name also points to
    the selected stop. If this is the correct stop, click Track Bus Stop, or touch
    one of the other bus stops if it is not the correct stop once track bus stop is
    clicked confirm your choice. Now you are actively tracking the stop. A green
    radar icon will appear in the upper right hand corner of the app. Next, walk toward the
    tracked stop. You can follow your progress and locate yourself on the map
    by following the dark blue solid circle. A small blue arrow shows the
    direction that you are walking. When you’re approximately 1/3 of a block away from
    the stop, you’ll start to feel pulse vibrations. (PHONE VIBRATION SFX) These vibrations will intensify
    the closer you walk to the stop. A notification and alarm vibration
    will occur when you’ve reached your stop. (MULTIPLE PHONE VIBRATION SFX) You can then dismiss the
    notification or review the next arrivals.

    METRO TRIP App – First Time Running the App
    Articles, Blog

    METRO TRIP App – First Time Running the App

    February 8, 2020


    Welcome to the METRO Trip app. This video will show you many of the important features of the app the first time you run it. Start out by
    clicking the green METRO Trip app icon. After reviewing the quick tip screens
    you’ll then see the main screen. Starting from the top, you’ll see
    three lines that represent the menu icon. To the right are the search and
    plan a trip icons. Looking again to the left part of the screen, you’ll see
    multiple circles. These are bus routes. You can scroll up and down to see
    what routes are near your location. The blue icon in the upper right corner of the
    map is the center button. Click this icon to recenter the map on your location.
    Lastly, the dark blue solid circle located at the center of the larger circle
    shows your current location on the map. The small blue dots show the locations
    of the closest bus stops near you. Now, let’s set up the app. Click the
    menu icon to reveal the menu. Click the settings icon near the bottom of the menu. You’ll then be asked to set a notification. There are two kinds of notifications:
    pulse vibrations and background vibrations. If you have an older version of Android, you
    may not see background vibration option. Click the toggle on the right part of the
    menu to activate these features. Now, close the menu to activate these
    features and return to the main screen. Clicking one of the routes launches a pop-up
    which will ask what direction you’re traveling. Just choose your direction. Once you’ve
    selected your direction, the bus route is displayed as a black line. The bus stop closest to your location is shown as a large blue bus icon. with the stop name pointing at the stop. After the data has been sent to the
    app the live location of the buses on the route you chose will be revealed on
    the app. Green moving icons denote live buses. A gray bus icon represents a bus
    that is not reporting its location. These buses will move according
    to the schedule of the chosen route. The bottom portion of the map now shows
    the route name, its direction, the stop name, and the and the stop ID. You can the map as well as pinch and zoom. At the bottom of the app are the predicted At the bottom of the app are the predicted
    arrival times. Real-time predictions project the bus arrival time to within a
    five minute window. If the bus is not reporting, the time will be grayed over,
    denoting the scheduled arrival time. Pressing the up arrow in the lower right
    part of the app, displays the predictions in a clock like format. Another major
    feature is the plan a trip. Click the plan a trip icon in the top right hand
    corner of the app — its shaped like an arrow. If you’re planning a trip from
    your current location, just enter your destination address on
    the To line. Now pick your destination from the drop-down. Click the three
    vertical dots to change when you want to leave. Or just go straight to the itineraries down below. Once you’ve chosen your itinerary, clicking
    the up arrow shows more of the trip. If you’ve turned on pulse vibrations, the track
    itinerary button will also appear. Click the track itinerary button and confirm tracking. A green radar icon will now appear on the screen to show the actively tracked trip. Clicking the track itinerary
    once more, enables you to cancel the tracking.

    A Hiring Event and a New App Among T2050 Light Rail Updates – City Update
    Articles, Blog

    A Hiring Event and a New App Among T2050 Light Rail Updates – City Update

    February 7, 2020


    [SHOW THEME MUSIC]>>HELLO, AND WELCOME TO ANOTHER
    “CITY UPDATE.” I’M DEBORAH SEDILLO DUGAN. WE ARE HERE IN THE DOWNTOWN
    AREA, RIGHT HERE IN THE HEART OF PHOENIX. I’M HERE WITH MARKUS COLEMAN. HE IS A LIGHT-RAIL
    ADMINISTRATOR. WE ARE GOING TO GET AN UPDATE ON
    WHAT’S GOING ON WITH LIGHT RAIL. NICE SEEING YOU.>>IT’S NICE TO SEE YOU AGAIN
    AS WELL.>>I LOVE THE DOWNTOWN AREA. LIGHT RAIL IS HAPPENING. RIDERS ARE HAPPENING. ASU DOWNTOWN,
    IT’S A BUSTLING AREA.>>WE HAVE A LOT GOING ON
    RIGHT NOW.>>SO LET’S TALK ABOUT 2050,
    TRANSIT 2050, BIG PICTURE. LOT OF VOTERS VOTED FOR THIS.>>BIG PICTURE, I WOULD SAY THE
    THING THAT PEOPLE NEED TO REALIZE, AND WE KEEP CLOSE TO
    THE CHEST, IS THAT IN 2015, TAX WENT OUT TO THE VOTERS. VOTERS CAME OUT AND
    SUPPORTED TRANSIT. AND NOT ONLY SUPPORTED TRANSIT
    IN A WAY OF SAYING 7/10THS OF A CENT, BUT SUPPORTED TRANSIT
    TO MAKE SURE THAT WE’RE INCREASING SERVICES. INCREASING THE WAY THAT
    WE’RE PROVIDING TRANSIT TO THE COMMUNITY. AND ALSO INCREASING THE WAY THAT
    WE’RE LISTENING AND HEARING AND ENGAGING WITH THE COMMUNITY. AND SO THAT MEANS THAT WE’VE
    BEEN ABLE TO LOOK AT OUR INCREASE OF OUR BUS SERVICE, OUR
    INCREASE TO OUR RAIL SERVICE, AND ALSO BRINGING ON NEW SERVICE
    THAT’S GOING TO BE NEW TO THE VALLEY, WHICH IS OUR
    BUS RAPID TRANSIT, BRT SERVICE.>>I LOVE IT, AND YOU KNOW
    I’M A RAPID — I LOVE IT. I LOVE THE COMFORT OF THE RAPID
    AND GETTING TO AND FROM WORK. SO WITH THIS 2050, TRANSIT 2050,
    THERE ARE SOME EXTENSIONS GOING ON, TOO, FOR NORTHEAST,
    SOUTH CENTRAL. TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THAT.>>SO WE ACTUALLY HAVE THREE
    EXTENSIONS THAT ARE RIGHT NOW CURRENTLY PART OF THE PROJECT
    PILOT PROGRAM. AND ONE OF THE PROJECTS IS THE
    SOUTH CENTRAL EXTENSION. SOUTH CENTRAL EXTENSION IS ABOUT
    FIVE AND A HALF MILES. IT STARTS IN DOWNTOWN PHOENIX. HEADS DOWN THE CENTRAL ALIGNMENT
    ALL THE WAY TO BASELINE ROAD. THAT’S WHERE THE TERMINUS IS. THAT EXTENSION WILL ALSO INCLUDE
    A DOWNTOWN HUB STATION. IT HAS APPROXIMATELY 18 LOCAL
    ARTISTS, 14 OF THEM — WITH 18 ARTISTS TOTAL, 14 OF THEM
    WHICH ARE LOCAL. THAT WAS REALLY A BIG KEY FOR US
    TO MAKE SURE WE HAVE THAT LOCAL IMPACT TO THE PROJECT. AS WELL AS WE’VE PARTNERED WITH
    KIEWIT, WHO IS OUR CONTRACTOR ON THE PROJECT, TO MAKE SURE THAT
    WE HAVE SOME OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOCAL RESIDENCE ALONG
    THE ALIGNMENT. AS WELL THEN WE HAVE OUR CAPITAL
    I-10 PROJECT, WHICH IS A 10-MILE EXTENSION. THAT’S GOING TO BE DONE IN
    TWO PHASES CURRENTLY. THE FIRST PHASE GIVES US FROM
    DOWNTOWN TO THE CAPITAL. THEN FROM THE CAPITAL, IT WILL
    FOLLOW THE I-10 ALIGNMENT ALL THE WAY OUT TO 79TH AVENUE.>>WOW, WAY OUT WEST. IT’S ALMOST TO CALIFORNIA. THAT’S GREAT.>>NORTHWEST EXTENSION PHASE 2
    IS A PROJECT THAT WILL START FROM 19TH AVENUE AND DUNLAP,
    EXTENDING OVER TO METRO CENTER MALL. AND WE’RE REALLY EXCITED ABOUT
    THIS, BECAUSE THIS WOULD BE THE FIRST TIME THEY’RE GOING TO HAVE
    AN ELEVATED BRIDGE GOING OVER THE I-17 FREEWAY,
    WITH THE TERMINUS BEING IN METRO CENTER MALL. THIS IS GOING TO ALLOW US TO
    EXTEND THAT 19TH AVENUE AND DUNLAP LOCATION ALL THE WAY OVER
    TO THE MALL, MAKING SURE THAT WE HAVE A SEAMLESS CONNECTION FROM
    METRO CENTER ALL THE WAY TO DOWNTOWN PHOENIX.>>WELL, AFTER ALL, FOLKS,
    WE ARE THE FIFTH LARGEST CITY IN THE COUNTRY, AND THIS IS
    LIFE IN THE BIG CITY. TRANSPORTATION IS KEY. SO THE COMMUNITY KNOWS
    THIS IS ALL HAPPENING. TALK ABOUT COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
    AND HOW PEOPLE, IF THEY HAVE QUESTIONS OR NEED TO GET MORE
    INVOLVED, AND WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THEIR HOOD.>>SO ACTUALLY WE’VE BEEN REALLY
    FOCUSED, AND OUR COUNCIL AND OUR PARTNERS AT VALLEY METRO HAVE
    BEEN REALLY FOCUSED ON THE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PIECE OF
    ALL THREE OF THE PROJECTS. REALLY MAKING SURE THAT WE
    GET THAT MESSAGE OUT TO THE COMMUNITY. THAT THEY’RE INVOLVED, THEY’RE
    ABLE TO GIVE THEIR FEEDBACK, AND THEY’RE ABLE TO GET PROJECT
    INFORMATION AS CLOSE TO REAL TIME AS POSSIBLE. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT VALLEY
    METRO HAS ACTUALLY BEEN ABLE TO DO WITH THE LAUNCH OF THE SOUTH
    CENTRAL PROJECT IS THIS PAST MONDAY, WE’VE LAUNCHED
    “CONSTRUCT VALLEY METRO.” IT’S THE APPLICATION THAT YOU
    CAN GET ON YOUR iPHONE. YOU CAN GET ON YOUR ANDROID. AND THAT APP WILL ALLOW YOU TO
    GET UP-TO-DATE NOTIFICATIONS. IT ALLOW YOU TO GET PROJECT
    INFORMATION THAT’S UP TO DATE. IT’LL ALSO LET YOU CUSTOMIZE
    SOME OF THE NOTIFICATION THAT YOU HAVE, AND GET REAL-TIME
    INFORMATION, AND ALSO GIVE FEEDBACK ON THE PROJECT.>>WOW, THAT’S GREAT,
    THAT’S EXCELLENT. EVERYTHING’S VERY INTERACTIVE
    FOR FOLKS. AND YOU CAN ALWAYS GO USE THE
    PUBLIC LIBRARY TO GET INFORMATION, OR A SENIOR CENTER,
    COMMUNITY CENTER. ALL THOSE PLACES HAVE COMPUTERS. I LOVE IT, THAT’S GREAT. YOU HAVE A JOB FAIR COMING UP,
    TOO. LET’S TALK ABOUT THAT, BECAUSE
    IT’S GOING TO OFFER A LOT OF POSITIONS AND JOBS
    FOR THE COMMUNITY.>>SO WE HAVE A JOB FAIR
    COMING UP FEBRUARY 11. AND WE PARTNER WITH ARIZONA AT
    WORK AND OUR CONTRACTOR KIEWIT TO MAKE SURE THAT WE CAN
    MAKE THIS HAPPEN. AND SO WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN IS
    WE’RE HAVING PEOPLE COME IN, BEING ABLE TO GET HELP WITH
    THEIR RESUMES RIGHT THERE ON THE SPOT. BEING ABLE TO MEET WITH THE
    CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS RIGHT THERE ON THE SPOT. BECAUSE WE’RE LOOKING, BETWEEN
    THE SOUTH CENTRAL PROJECT AND NORTHWEST EXTENSION PHASE 2,
    WE’RE LOOKING AT APPROXIMATELY 2,000 JOBS — 1,000 TO 2,000
    JOBS THAT WE’LL HAVE COMING ON BOARD IN CONSTRUCTION
    AND SKILL WORK. THEN SO WITH THAT, WE’RE
    EXPECTING AT LEAST 200 OF THOSE JOBS TO BE PEOPLE
    WHO ARE FIRST-TIME INTO CONSTRUCTION FIELDS.>>OH, THAT’S EXCELLENT. SO NOT ONLY WE’RE BRINGING
    TRANSIT AND MORE OF TRANSIT IN LIFE IN THE BIG CITY. WE’RE ALSO BRINGING MORE JOBS
    WITH THIS PROJECT. SO IF YOU WANT TO CHECK OUT THIS
    JOB FAIR, WE’RE PUTTING IT RIGHT HERE ON THE SCREEN TO FIND OUT
    HOW TO GO AND ATTEND TO IT. SO MARKUS, IT’S GREAT SEEING YOU
    AS ALWAYS. GREAT UPDATE ABOUT LIGHT RAIL. I’M SO EXCITED, BECAUSE I AM
    A TRANSIT USER, FOR SURE, FOR SURE.>>YOU SHOULD BE.>>ABSOLUTELY, I AM.>>EVERYONE OUT THERE SHOULD BE
    AS WELL.>>THAT’S RIGHT, THAT’S RIGHT. FOR “CITY UPDATE,”
    I’M DEBORAH SEDILLO DUGAN. PostCAP LLC
    postcapllc.com
    844-335-0911 [MUSIC]

    METRO Presents: Voices in My Commute
    Articles, Blog

    METRO Presents: Voices in My Commute

    February 5, 2020


    (RELAXING MUSIC PLAYS UNDER) (POOF SFX) Whaaaat? Pssst, Lisa. By riding METRO, you can save $10,000 a year. And avoid…this. Aww, c’mon man!! Recalculating…
    Your arrival time is 1.5 hours. (SIGH)
    Seriously? Seriously. (POOF SFX)
    Hey, Lisa. Let’s get you back on METRO.

    Streetcars and Metro Vancouver: Urban Planning History Explained
    Articles, Blog

    Streetcars and Metro Vancouver: Urban Planning History Explained

    January 29, 2020


    Vancouver was built around the streetcar. If you want to understand Vancouver you have to understand the streetcar. In its first 40 years Vancouver developed with surprisingly little government involvement. The Canadian Pacific Railway laid out and named its streets in a flexible grid pattern before the city government even existed. The streetcar company determined which streets would be major One of the great shapers of Metro Vancouver was Robert Horne-Payne, President of the BC Electric streetcar Company which he incorporated on Threadneedle Street in London London was the inspiration an unplanned City whose order arose incrementally from human actions not human design From his home and wheelchair in Brentwood England he personally made all major streetcar decisions, harnessing market forces to build the transportation and hydroelectric Infrastructure of the region. The 1880s changed world cities – first electric street lights then electric streetcars. In one week Vancouver got both an instant modern city The Marchetti Constant says a city area is limited by an average 1/2 hour commute Even great ancient cities only had a 2.5 kilometer walkable radius Streetcars tripled this to 7.5 kilometers The increase in area became the streetcar suburb requiring a new form of housing. In Europe the worst living was the ground-floor the best, the next floor up the Piano Nobile called the first floor in Britain and some Vancouver buildings With no elevators, the cheapest floor was the highest the opposite of today. Growing grass or gardens not food gave status The single detached house elevated with stairs was perfect for the 1890s. Almost all Vancouver houses were built On Spec that is by speculators. Horne-Payne offered discounted transit to populate the new neighborhoods.A healthy streetcar line needs a catchment area on both sides for maximum riders A line beside water or Park or close to another line will have reduced ridership Major streets were set just under one kilometer apart Homeowners on successful streetcar lines built stores on their front yards All our neighborhood shopping streets started this way Some of the original houses can still be seen today With zoning, conversions like this became illegal Streetcar extensions that developed after zoning have few stores Main Street has retail up to 33rd Avenue the original streetcar stop. On Fraser retail follows the original line to 51st Avenue. On Victoria North of Kingsway no streetcar no retail. South of Kingsway the shopping street ends at the old stop on 43rd Avenue Streets like Knight Cambie and Macdonald got transit after zoning and have almost no retail at all Retail prefers flat land Davie and Robson have few stores on their hill Commercial Drive had ample housing thus healthy retail but Venables went through a swampy area It became industrial The original geography of Vancouver can be discerned. Park school and industrial sites were often marshy areas not suitable for housing BC Electric powered homes and industries Horne-Payne switched from coal to hydroelectric by linking Coquitlam Lake to Buntzen Lake named after a company manager Then power stations on Indian arm He linked Alouette Lake to Stave Lake power and diverted the Bridge River for Seton Lake power Horne-Payne built a factory in New Westminster that produced hundreds of streetcars BC Electric’s focus on technology and experts influenced culture Its corporate headquarters was B C’s first modernist high-rise now a condominium Studies show BC Electric invested more and took less than most other city systems. Voters refused to purchase BC Electric believing government ownership would mean increased taxes. Indeed, after the Province nationalized BC Electric in 1961 tax payers have subsidized transit ever since Horne- Payne faced a boom and bust economy. The value of Vancouver building permits peaked 1913 and 1929 twenty million dollars plunging to two million dollars shortly after The gas powered automobile expanded the city radius to 20 km One landowner built the Lions Gate Bridge so car driving home buyers could reach his properties BC Electric shifted to gas buses although even today Electric trolley buses largely follow the original streetcar lines Vancouver’s expansion began with the Powell line to the original High Street Cordova, then Granville and Pender Westminster now Main Street crossed a company bridge the High Street then Granville and Pacific Over the Granville Bridge on Broadway seven trestles over streams Eventually the looping Fairview Beltway In New Westminster Columbia climbing to Queens Park to 6th and 6th the Central Park interurban line like Kingsway avoided crossing water by taking the highest route linking these isolated settlements initiating Metrotown and Collingwood leading South Vancouver and Burnaby to incorporate Hastings role strengthened. The Robson line opened the West End Stanley Park line by the all-important post office down Pender and Georgia The planned Bidwell line was changed to Denman then up Davie Main and Powell were extended BC Electric acquired the Kitsilano Trestle and a line serving industry on False Creek Main Street to 33rd to the Mountain View Cemetery and the rock quarries making possible the Queen Elizabeth Gardens A ferry bringing passengers to the North Shore was at the Inner Harbour,s widest slowest moving point Four times a day this large body of water rushed through the treacherous First Narrows at often ten times the speed Horne-Payne had wanted a rational line on 3rd Street but the region’s first public consultation process forced a substandard route The main line up Lonsdale another to Lynn Valley Horne-Payne purchased the forest up to the Capilano Suspension Bridge and gifted it as the park we enjoy today The Sockeye Express climbed around the Quilchena Park plain source of some of the world’s largest timber to a place it called, Kerrisdale Downtown Point Grey with a City Hall and now residential towers This line to Steveston led fishing and farming to flourish Georgia and Keefer, Broadway to Fraser Robson to Recreation Park The Royal Columbian British Columbia’s first hospital. A freight line to a brickyard led to the flatter Marpole Line for heavy goods from New Westminster on to Vancouver Fourth Avenue was the original line West to Alma giving its finer-grained retail Powell the original line to East Vancouver to the PNE entrance Hastings gained prominence with a line to -Boundary Road . A line went up Kingway then Fraser to 51st then Victoria to 43rd. Cordova linked to Granville. A bridge enabled the Fraser Valley line opening up new communities Lumber mills and farms flourished and BC Electric brought thousands of gallons of milk to Vancouver every day It avoided the massive but shallow Sumas Lake. The province built the Vedder Canal and drained the lake Chilliwack incorporated anticipating the arrival Broadway only went to Trafalgar the end of CPR property Main extended to 50th then 63rd Richards and Cambie to Hastings The Burnaby Lake Line is now the Trans Canada freeway. Its boulevard on First Avenue veered off at Nanaimo to join Commercial Drive First Avenue was never meant to be an arterial and still looks residential Powell to Venables on Commercial Kingsway to Joyce, Broadway to Commercial Granville to King Edward Main to the Marpole Line, Fraser to 59th Fourth up Alma to Tenth to Sasmat to Fourth later to Drummond 41st to Dunbar To the Fraser Mills the largest in Canada. A connector on Sixth Street a bridge over the Fraser to Queensborough The Highland Park cut off which is still used by the Expo Line today Granville to Oak on 33rd Oak to Broadway then Oak to Main on 16th The Connaught or Cambie Bridge linked to Robson Richards to Drake, Nanaimo to Broadway The east half of False Creek was filled from the Grandview Cut The Crown Bypass 16th to Dunbar 41st from Boulevard to Main Oak Street to Marpole Victoria to 54th Kingsway to Earles Hastings to Ellesmere. Fraser connected to Marine Drive The Powell line linked to Hastings and the PNE entrance moved though it still feels like the back door Granville Island streets follow the old BC Electric rails Broadway to Alma then the Dunbar bypass led Crown to close Horne- Payne cancelled the streetcar to Rupert Street and instituted Metro Vancouver’s first bus line Signaling the beginning of the end for streetcars BC Electric had expanded its network conservatively Many streetcar companies had gone broke and there was no government to bail them out Horne -Payne rarely approved extensions unless there were contributions by landowners and there was development already in the area He refused to get involved in land speculation or property development, focusing solely on the core business Because decisions were made in London.there was a buffer from public and political pressure Metro Vancouver was more compact because of BC Electric Robert Horne-Payne sold BC Electric and passed away Leaving a region that had grown organically through market forces with little government involvement

    Houston METRORail, Afternoon Rush Hour at Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, 4K
    Articles, Blog

    Houston METRORail, Afternoon Rush Hour at Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, 4K

    January 28, 2020


    Texas Medical Center (T.M.C.) is one of the largest medical center in the world. In this station, you can access to several hospital or enter to Houston Zoo (few blocks from the station). Houston Zoo and Hermann Park is located at the right-side of the screen (background) The bus that passed by the station (on your right) is a transit service for Fort Bend County. Automobile and trains share the road in most part of T.M.C. It would be neat if METRO burry this train underground so the train won’t interfere traffic. Also, the train will go much faster. Elevated would be impossible because of the sky bridges that goes above the train tracks. This is one of the busiest station in Houston. You see, sometimes the train has to stop for the traffic signal. This station is also one of the busiest. Train almost reared end the car… The O’Quinn Medical Tower. On the right-side, the man with the yellow jacket is a METRO Fare Inspector. Approaching Red line northbound train.

    Riding Houston METRORail from Texas Medical Center to Downtown
    Articles, Blog

    Riding Houston METRORail from Texas Medical Center to Downtown

    January 6, 2020


    Welcome to Texas Medical Center (TMC) Transit Center. I am heading to the rail station via the sky bridge. Then take the METRORail Red line to Downtown Houston (going north). Crossing over the skybridge. Fun Fact: TMC is one of the largest medical center in the world. Another bus terminal. Facing southeast of Houston. I’m heading down to the rail platform. Arriving METRORail Red line (north bound). Friday morning rush hour. At the background, there is a blue bus called “Quickline”. Quickline is a service that bypass several bus stops. It’s kind-of like an express local bus. Leaving TMC Transit Center. Going under Holcombe underpass. Leaving the TMC District. At the background is Rice University. Entering the Museum District. Entering Midtown. Entering Downtown Houston.