Browsing Tag: india

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    Main Tota Hare Rang Ka | मैं तोता मैं तोता | Hindi Kids Rhymes By Kids TV

    September 16, 2019


    Meethu Meethuuu… Meethu Meethuuu… Main Tota…Main Tota… Hare rang ka hun dikhta Main Tota…Main Tota… Hare rang ka hun dikhta Choch mere laal rang ki… Meethu Meethu mein karta… Choch mere laal rang ki… Meethu Meethu mein karta… Meethuuu Meethuuu… Meethuuu Meethuuu… Main Tota…Main Tota… Neel gagan mein hun udta… Main Tota…Main Tota… Neel gagan mein hun udta… Fal, Sabjiya, Daana khata Meethu Meethu main karta Fal, Sabjiya, Daana khata Meethu Meethu main karta Meethu Meethuuuu…. Main Tota…Main Tota… Kalakar bhi main hota Main Tota…Main Tota… Kalakar bhi main hota… Karta hun main sabki nakal Meethu Meethu main karta… Karta hun main sabki nakal Meethu Meethu main karta… Meethu Meethuuuu…. Meethu Meethuuuu…. Main Tota…Main Tota… Hare rang ka hun dikhta Main Tota…Main Tota… Hare rang ka hun dikhta Thumak Thumak kar chalta hun Meethu Meethu main karta… Thumak Thumak kar chalta hun Meethu Meethu main karta… Meethu Meethuuuu….

    🚋 Tramway Exotica: Trams of Indian Subcontinent – Documentary | Kolkata | Part 3
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    🚋 Tramway Exotica: Trams of Indian Subcontinent – Documentary | Kolkata | Part 3

    September 12, 2019


    Although the Calcutta tramways company did remain british-owned for many years following independence It was managed by the state of West Bengal after August 1967 Now the state-owned CTC operates India’s last surviving tramway the Calcutta story begins with a short-lived meter gauge horse line opened in 1873 This was followed by a larger network of lines probably built to the four foot eight and a half inch gauge these were open progressively by the Calcutta tramways Company between 1880 and 1884 At times Steam trams were also used Electric trams first appeared in 1902 and for the next 30 years of variety of two-axle first-class single-decker motorcars were built together with matching second-class trailers Starting in 1948 and continuing well into the 60s many were rebuilt and permanently coupled together Known as streamlined trains or utility cars M-class numbers 1 to 179 would have special interest to visiting British Enthusiasts as some had trucks acquired from systems such as Leeds Leicester Oldham and Stockport Eventually their collection of inherited motors would be replaced by imports from Hungary These M’s feature prominently in the following film sequences taken between 1960 and 1978 by Messrs Cunningham Healy Matthews Santorelli and Todd The CTC never operated double deckers and only a handful of conventional bogie cars These were J class numbers 301 to 306 built by English Electric in 1931 on maximum traction bogies Somewhat rebuilt this view shows one later in life coupled to a 4-wheel trailer English electric also provided the first three examples of the much more successful que class Like the J’s 307 2 309 were delivered in 1931 referred to by the CTC as the articulated or English cars a further 180 KS numbers 3 10 2 4 8 9 were built locally between 1932 and 1939 Conceived and first tested in England each end has a powered maximum traction truck with an unpowered Equal wheel truck under the articulation all the trucks motors and controllers coming from English Electric Like the Jake laughs they were fitted with air brakes as where all subsequent new cars The caves had two entirely separate body sections each with its own drop center entrance There being no physical connection between the first and second class saloons The official overall capacity of about a hundred and twenty was often exceeded During the early sixties when these Sequences were filmed most case still looked relatively smart in their gray and cream a color scheme Which had displaced the original chocolate and cream with delivery of the J’s and KS in 1931 After the case came the streamline L class articulated 492 five five nine built between 1942 and 1951 When first delivered these cars supported a top-heavy cowling on the roof of the first class saloon Which had concealed the resistances as on these post-war ELLs this cowling was later reduced in size Like the case each car carried a crew of three supplemented in P cars on the busiest sections by extra conductors known as line conductors Although all their equipment was from English electric the elves differed from the earlier case in riding on three equal wheel trucks During the 50s several caves have been rebuilt with lengthened bodies and slightly different rear ends to the ELLs in This view the rebuilt K is on the left This shows the more rounded front end Nonno polka works handled everything from building new bodies to keeping older veterans on the road When the state took over the company in 1967 it had envisaged phasing out the trams by the early seventies but oil prices Pollution and a change of heart by planners led to the decision to retain the system Using some of the second-hand equipment purchased from Bombay 201 – 206 entered service in the mid sixties these were experimental first-class, PA. Ye cars Several older vehicles were also adapted for PA. Ye and painted in this striking cream and blue livery However the PA. Ye concept proved impractical and was dropped about 1970 There was no doubt the trams played a major part in moving Calcutta’s Millions For example in 1959 there were some twenty six services Operating from eight depots over the 42 mile system and they carried a staggering 400 million passengers Prior to the introduction of route numbers in 1958 coloured symbols and lights have been used You You

    [HYDERABAD METRO RAIL] PM मोदी हैदराबाद मेट्रो का उद्घाटन करेंगे THE NEWS INDIA
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    [HYDERABAD METRO RAIL] PM मोदी हैदराबाद मेट्रो का उद्घाटन करेंगे THE NEWS INDIA

    September 12, 2019


    Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a Hyderabad tour today. During this time PM Modi will inaugurate the Hyderabad Metro. PM has reached Hyderabad

    Chuk Chuk Karti Rail Chali | Hindi Nursery Rhymes For Children
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    Chuk Chuk Karti Rail Chali | Hindi Nursery Rhymes For Children

    September 11, 2019


    Chuk Chuk karte aati hai… Chuk Chuk geet gaati hain… Ha ha ha ha … Chuk chuk karke aati hain Chuk Chuk ke geet gaati hain… Sabko sair karati hai,rail gaadi Ha ha ha rail gaadi Chuk chuk karke aati hain Chuk Chuk ke geet gaati hain… Sabko sair karati hai,rail gaadi Ha ha ha rail gaadi … Gaav sheher jungle ghane,dariya parvat aur jharne Gaav sheher jungle ghane,dariya parvat aur jharne Sabkuch humme dikhati hain rail gaadi Ha Ha Ha rail gaadi… Chuk chuk karke aati hain Chuk Chuk ke geet gaati hain… Sabko sair karati hai,rail gaadi Ha Ha Ha rail gaadi… Jao chahe kitne dur… Kabhi na hote thakkar chur… Ha Jao chahe kitne dur… Kabhi na hote thakkar chur. Manzil par pahochati hai rail gaadi… Ha Ha Ha rail gaadi… Chuk chuk karke aati hain Chuk Chuk ke geet gaati hain… Sabko sair karati hai,rail gaadi Ha Ha Ha rail gaadi…

    [HYDERABAD] Hyderabad metro railway designed by foreign technical THE NEWS INDIA
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    [HYDERABAD] Hyderabad metro railway designed by foreign technical THE NEWS INDIA

    September 8, 2019


    There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken. There is a short time left for the metro rail in the city to start soon. The special thing is that with the adoption of complete foreign technology for this Metro Rail, the help of consultants from abroad has been taken.

    India to get Worlds Fastest Bullet Train that will Go Under the Sea
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    India to get Worlds Fastest Bullet Train that will Go Under the Sea

    September 5, 2019


    India to get Worlds Fastest Bullet Train that
    will Go Under the Sea . In AHMEDABAD The groundbreaking ceremony for
    the ambitious Mumbai-Ahmedabad High Speed Rail Project, commonly referred to as the
    bullet train project, will be performed here on September 14 by Prime Minister Narendra
    Modi and his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe, officials said today. The groundbreaking ceremony (bhoomi-pujan)
    for the project, coming up at an estimated cost of Rs 98,000 crore, will be held at a
    ground near the Sabarmati railway station in the city, said a senior government official. Both the leaders are expected to stay here
    for three days, starting from September 13. Japanese PM Shinzo Abe and our PM would arrive
    in Gujarat on September 13 afternoon. The next morning, they would attend the groundbreaking
    ceremony of the high speed rail project at the Sabarmati railway station. Both of them are expected to leave on September
    15 morning,” the official said. Apart from this project, various MoUs related
    to investments and tie-ups will also be signed in the presence of these leaders, the official
    said, adding that bilateral talks will also be held between the two here. The high speed railway line between Ahmedabad
    and Mumbai is expected to cover 508 kilometers in about two hours with an operating speed
    of around 320 kmph. It is expected to become operational by 2023. Eighty-one per cent of the project cost will
    be in the form of a loan from Japan. As per the detailed project report by the
    Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), while most part of the corridor is proposed
    to be on the elevated track, there will be a stretch after Thane creek towards Virar
    which will go under the sea. Last year, when Modi visited Japan in November,
    it was announced through a joint statement that the construction will commence by the
    end of 2018, while the groundbreaking ceremony will be held in 2017. So what do you think of the prime minister
    of India Narendra Modi giving away the world’s fastest bullet train to the Indian people. Will it help to reduce the traffic of India
    or these are just stepping stones for the traffic source. Post your Comments below
    And if you like this Video please Give a Thumbs-Up And follow us on Social Networks
    And Subscribe to our Channel And Thanks for Watching
    This is WC Daily Think Big Think Different
    Bye

    Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course World History #32
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    Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course World History #32

    August 27, 2019


    Hi, I’m John Green; this is Crash Course
    World History, and today we’re going to discuss the series of events that made it
    possible for you to watch Crash Course. And also made this studio possible. And made the
    warehouse containing the studio possible. A warehouse, by the way, that houses stuff
    for warehouses. That’s right, it’s time to talk about the Industrial Revolution. Although it occurred around the same time
    as the French, American, Latin American, and Haitian Revolutions – between, say, 1750 and
    1850 – the industrial revolution was really the most revolutionary of the bunch. Past John: No way, dude. All those other revolutions
    resulted in, like, new borders and flags and stuff. Present John: [sigh] We’ve studied 15,000
    years of history here at Crash Course, Me from the Past. And borders and flags have
    changed plenty, and they’re going to keep changing. But in all that time, nothing much changed
    about the way we disposed of waste or located drinking water or acquired clothing. Most people lived
    on or very close to the land that provided their food. Except for a few exceptions, life expectancy
    never rose above 35 or below 25. Education was a privilege, not a right. In all those
    millennia, we never developed a weapon that could kill more than a couple dozen people
    at once, or a way to travel faster than horseback. For 15,000 years, most humans never owned
    or used a single item made outside of their communities. Simon Bolivar didn’t change that and
    neither did the American Declaration of Independence. You have electricity? Industrial Revolution.
    Blueberries in February? Industrial Revolution. You live somewhere other than a farm? Industrial
    Revolution. You drive a car? Industrial Revolution. You get twelve years of free, formal education?
    Industrial Revolution. Your bed, your antibiotics, your toilet, your contraception, your tap
    water, your every waking and sleeping second: Industrial Revolution. [theme music] Here’s one simple statistic that sums it
    up: Before the industrial revolution, about 80% of the world’s population was engaged
    in farming to keep itself and the other 20% of people from starving. Today, in the United States,
    less than 1% of people list their occupation as farming. I mean, we’ve come so far that we don’t
    even have to farm flowers anymore. Stan, are these real, by the way? I can’t tell if
    they’re made out of foam or digital. So what happened? TECHNOLOGY! Here’s my definition: The Industrial Revolution was an increase
    in production brought about by the use of machines and characterized by the use of new
    energy sources. Although this will soon get more complicated, for our purposes today,
    industrialization is NOT capitalism – although, as we will see next week, it is connected
    to modern capitalism. And, the industrial revolution began around 1750 and it occurred
    across most of the earth, but it started in Europe, especially Britain. What happened?
    Well, let’s go to the Thought Bubble. The innovations of the Industrial Revolution
    were intimately interconnected. Like, look, for instance, at the British textile industry:
    The invention of the flying shuttle by John Kay in 1733 dramatically increased the speed
    of weaving, which in turn created demand for yarn, which led to inventions like the Spinning
    Jenny and the water frame. Soon these processes were mechanized using water power, until the
    steam engine came along to make flying shuttles really fly in these huge cotton mills. The most successful steam engine was built
    by Thomas “They Didn’t Name Anything After Me” Newcomen to clear water out of mines.
    And because water was cleared out of those mines, there was more coal to power more steam
    engines, which eventually led to the fancying up of the Newcomen Steam Engine by James “I
    Got a Unit of Power and a University Named After Me” Watt, whose engine made possible
    not only railroads and steamboats but also ever-more-efficient cotton mills. And, for the first time, chemicals other than
    stale urine (I wish I was kidding) were being used to bleach the cloth that people wore
    – the first of which was sulfuric acid, which was created in large quantities only thanks
    to lead-lined chambers, which would’ve been impossible without lead production rising
    dramatically right around 1750 in Britain, thanks to lead foundries powered by coal. And all these factors came together to make
    more yarn that could be spun and bleached faster and cheaper than ever before, a process
    that would eventually culminate in $18 Crash Course Mongols shirts. Available now at DFTBA.com.
    Thanks, Thought Bubble, for that shameless promotion of our beautiful, high-quality t-shirts
    available now at DFTBA.com. So, the problem here is that with industrialization
    being so deeply interconnected, it’s really difficult to figure out why it happened in
    Europe, especially Britain. And that question of why turns out to be one of the more contentious
    discussions in world history today. For instance, here are some Eurocentric reasons
    why industrialization might have happened first in Europe: There’s the cultural superiority
    argument that basically holds that Europeans are just better and smarter than other people.
    Sometimes this is formulated as Europeans possessing superior rationality. By the way,
    you’ll never guess where the people who make this argument tend to come from – unless
    you guessed that they come from Europe. And then, others argue that only Europe had
    the culture of science and invention that made the creation of these revolutionary technologies
    possible. Another argument is that freer political institutions encouraged innovation and strong
    property rights created incentives for inventors. And, finally, people often cite Europe’s
    small population because small populations require labor-saving inventions. Oh, it’s
    time for the Open Letter? An Open Letter to the Steam Engine. But first,
    let’s see what’s in the secret compartment today. Oh, it’s a TARDIS. Truly the apex
    of British industrialization. Dear Steam Engine, You know what’s crazy?
    You’ve really never been improved upon. Like this thing, which facilitates time travel,
    probably runs on a steam engine. Almost all electricity around the world, whether it’s
    from coal or nuclear power, is just a steam engine. It’s all still just water and heat, and
    it speaks to how truly revolutionary the Industrial Revolution was that since then, it’s really
    just been evolution. Best Wishes, John Green So, you may have heard any of those rationales
    for European industrialization, or you may have heard others. The problem with all of
    them, is that each time you think you’re at the root cause it turns out there’s a
    cause of the root cause. To quote Leonardo DiCaprio, James Cameron, and coal mine operators,
    “We have to go deeper.” But, anyway, the problem with these Eurocentric
    why answers, is that they all apply to either China or India or both. And it’s really
    important to note that in 1800, it was not clear that Europe was going to become the
    world’s dominant manufacturing power in the next hundred years. At the time, China,
    India, and Europe were all roughly at the same place in terms of industrial production. First, let’s look at China. It’s hard
    to make the European cultural superiority argument because China had been recording
    its history since before Confucius, and plus there was all that bronze and painting and
    poetry. It’s also kind of difficult to make a blanket
    statement that China was economically inferior to Europe, since they invented paper money
    and led the world in exports of everything from silk to china. I mean, pre-Industrial
    Revolution, population growth was the surest sign of economic success, and China had the
    biggest population in the world. I guess that answers the question of whether they’re
    digital. It’s also difficult to say that China lacked
    a culture of invention when they invented gunpowder, and printing, and paper, and arguably
    compasses. And China had more free enterprise during the Song dynasty than anywhere in the
    world. Some argue that China couldn’t have free
    enterprise because they had a long history of trying to impose monopolies on items like
    salt and iron. And that’s true, but when it comes to enforcing those monopolies, they
    also had a long history of failure. So really, in a lot of ways, China was at least as primed
    for an Industrial Revolution as Britain was. So, why didn’t it happen? Well, Europeans
    – specifically the British – had two huge advantages: First, Coal. When you trace the
    story of improved transportation, or communication, or industrial efficiency, or better chemical
    manufacturing, it always comes back to coal, because the Industrial Revolution was all about
    using different forms of energy to automate production. And England had large supplies of coal that
    were near the surface, which meant that it was cheap to mine, so it quickly replaced
    wood for heating and cooking and stuff. So that encouraged the British to look for more
    coal. The only problem with coal mining, aside from it being, you know, like, deadly and
    everything, is that the coal mines flooded all the time. I guess coal mining is also
    a little problematic for, like, the health of, you know, like, the planet. But, because there was all this incentive
    to get more coal out of the ground, steam engines were invented to pump water out of
    the mines. And because those early steam engines were super inefficient, they needed a cheap
    and abundant source of fuel in order to work – namely, coal, which meant they were much
    more useful to the British than anyone else. So steam engines used cheap British coal to
    keep British coal cheap, and cheap British coal created the opportunity for everything
    from railroads to steel, which like so much else in the Industrial Revolution, created
    a positive feedback loop. Because they run on rails, railroads need steel. And because
    it is rather heavy, steel needs railroads. Secondly, there were Wages. Britain (and to
    a lesser extent the Low Countries) had the highest wages in the world at the beginning
    of the 18th century. In 1725, wages in London were the equivalent of 11 grams of silver
    per day. In Amsterdam, they were 9 grams. In Beijing, Venice, and Florence, they were
    under 4. And in Delhi, they were under 2. It’s not totally clear why wages were so
    high in Britain. Like, one argument is that the Black Death lowered population so much
    that it tightened labor markets, but that doesn’t explain why wages remained low in,
    like, plague-ravaged Italy. Mainly, high wages combined with cheap fuel costs meant that
    it was economically efficient for manufacturers to look to machines as a way of lowering their
    production costs. To quote the historian Robert Allen: “Wages were high and energy was cheap.
    These prices led directly to the industrial revolution by giving firms strong incentives
    to invent technologies that substituted capital and coal for labor.” Ugh, Stan, I’m a little worried that people
    are still going to accuse me of Eurocentrism. Of course, other people will accuse me of
    an anti-European bias. I don’t have a bias against Europe. I love Europe. Europe gave
    me many of my favorite cheeses and cross-country skiing and Charlie Chaplin, who inspired today’s
    Danica drawing. Like, the fact of coal being near the surface
    in Britain can’t be chalked up to British cultural superiority. But the wages question
    is a little different because it makes it sound like only Europeans were smart enough
    to pay high wages. But here’s one last thing to consider: India
    was the world’s largest producer of cotton textiles, despite paying basically the lowest
    wages in the world. Indian agriculture was so productive that laborers could be supported
    at a very low cost. And that, coupled with a large population, meant that Indian textile
    manufacturing could be very productive without using machines, so they didn’t need to industrialize. But more importantly from our perspective,
    there’s a strong argument to be made that Indian cotton production helped spur British
    industrialization. It was cotton textiles that drove the early Industrial Revolution,
    and the main reason that Britain was so eager to produce cottons was that demand was incredibly
    high. They were more comfortable than woolens, but they were also cheaper, because cottons
    could be imported from India at such a low cost. So, Indian cottons created the market and
    then British manufacturers invested in machines (and imported Indian know-how) to increase
    production so that they could compete with India. And that’s at least one way in which
    European industrialization was truly a world phenomenon. For those of you who enjoy such
    highly contentious and thorny, cultural historical debates, good news. Next week, we’ll be
    talking about capitalism. Thanks for watching, I’ll see you then. Crash Course is produced and directed by Stan
    Muller. Our script supervisor is Danica Johnson. The show is written by my high school history
    teacher, Raoul Meyer, and myself. We are ably interned by Meredith Danko. And our graphics
    team is Thought Bubble. Last week’s phrase of the week was “The
    New England Revolution.” That was challenging. If you want to suggest future phrases of the
    week or take a guess at this week’s, you can do so in comments, where you can also ask
    questions about today’s video that will be answered by our team of historians. Thanks for watching Crash Course, and as we
    say in my hometown, don’t forget to be awesome.

    Ambassador Juster completes one year in India
    Articles, Blog

    Ambassador Juster completes one year in India

    August 22, 2019


    Hi. I’m Ken Juster. I’ve now been in
    India for one year as the U.S. ambassador. It’s truly been an eventful year. The
    ties between our countries continue to grow stronger in so many ways. Last
    January, shortly after my arrival I said that the United States and India were on
    the path to forming an enduring partnership that would help define the
    21st century. My experience over the last year has given me even greater faith in
    this assessment. Our security cooperation has expanded and deepened. This was
    highlighted at the inaugural 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue held in New Delhi
    in September, when we signed a major communications and security agreement
    known as COMCASA. Our levels of bilateral trade and
    investment have reached new highs. We showcased the United States and India as
    leaders in innovation and technology at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit last
    November. And we launched our strategic energy dialogue and enhanced cooperation
    in aviation and railroad transportation. We celebrated the 18th anniversary of
    the Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum. And continue to do promising work in the
    healthcare and agricultural sector. And the United States and India worked
    together on regional connectivity in South Asia and peacekeeping in Africa,
    all as part of our broader coordination to promote a free and open Indo-Pacific
    region. Of course, all of these efforts are built on the foundation of
    extraordinary people-to-people ties between our two countries. And the
    dedication and cooperation of our Indian partners. My colleagues and I appreciate
    all that you do to enhance our relationship. It is truly a special
    privilege and honor to be the U.S. ambassador in this magnificent country.
    Thank you for all of your support. Please know that India has a true friend in the
    United States embassy.

    FROM DEFENCE TO BULLET TRAIN: WHERE ARE INDIA-JAPAN TIES HEADING?
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    FROM DEFENCE TO BULLET TRAIN: WHERE ARE INDIA-JAPAN TIES HEADING?

    August 21, 2019


    WELCOME TO World action and Reaction News…
    todays News is FROM DEFENCE TO BULLET TRAIN: WHERE ARE INDIA-JAPAN
    TIES HEADING? Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrived
    this week in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s home state of Gujarat for what was the tenth
    meeting between the two leaders since Modi came to power in 2014. The centrepiece of the visit has been the
    Mumbai-Ahmedabad high-speed rail project. Modi and Abe laid the foundation stone for
    the bullet train in Ahmedabad on Thursday, with the former lauding Japan as India’s friend
    for having extended a Rs 88,000 crore loan at just 0.1 per cent interest. Further cementing their bilateral ties, India
    and Japan on Thursday also signed 15 memorandums of understanding (MoUs), which dealt with
    wide-ranging issues such as bilateral relations, defence and security cooperation, and supporting
    each other for a permanent seat on the United Nations� expanded Security Council. It remains to be seen if the bullet train
    will prove to be economically viable and whether India and Japan’s joint front against China
    will yield any dividends for either of the nations going ahead. Japanese firms to invest Rs 5 lakh crore in
    India While no figure was released on how much Japanese
    companies planned to invest in India, some sources said it would be around Rs 5 lakh
    crore, including the flagship bullet train project. One of the more import MoUs was on civil aviation
    cooperation and open skies. (Read all the details here) Apart from fresh investment proposals at the
    summit, Modi claimed Japan�s foreign direct investment (FDI) to India had actually trebled
    in the past few years, a testimony to the growing economic ties. So far, around $25.7 billion has flown in
    as FDI from Japan; the plan now is to double this by 2019. Bullet train project kicks off Modi and Abe on Thursday laid the foundation
    stone for the proposed Ahmedabad-Mumbai High-Speed Rail Network, commonly known as the bullet
    train, in the Gujarat city of Ahmedabad. (Read our full coverage on the viability of
    the bullet train project here) Around Rs 1.10 lakh crore will be spent on
    the project that is being partially funded by Japan. Out of the Rs 1,10,000 crore, Japan is giving
    a loan of Rs 88,000 crore. The interest on this loan is minimal at 0.1
    per cent and it is to be repaid in 50 years, with a grace period of 15 years. The train will stop at each of the 12 railway
    stations on the route, but only for 165 seconds. A 21-km-long tunnel will be dug between Boisar
    and BKC in Mumbai, of which seven km will be under water. Enhancing Defence ties with an Eye on China,
    Countering Terrorism During the visit, Abe and Modi agreed to deepen
    defence ties and push for more cooperation with Australia and the United States, as they
    seek to counter growing Chinese influence across Asia. (Read all the details here) Abe’s visit comes less than three weeks after
    New Delhi and Beijing agreed to end the longest and most serious military confrontation along
    their shared and contested border in decades. In fact, Japan had come out in full support
    for India in its protracted military standoff with China at Doklam, near the Sikkim-Tibet-Bhutan
    tri-junction, saying no country should use unilateral forces to change the status quo
    on the ground. In a lengthy joint statement, India and Japan
    said deepening security links was paramount. This included collaboration on research into
    unmanned ground vehicles and robotics and the possibility of joint field exercises between
    their armies. There was also “renewed momentum” for cooperation
    with the United States and Australia. Both nations addressed the other’s security
    concerns beyond China too. Modi and Abe used the summit to jointly condemn
    North Korea�s latest nuclear test and uranium enrichment activities, urging the hermit nation
    to comply with UNSC resolutions. Further, one of the most significant joint
    announcements was when the two called upon all countries to work towards rooting out
    terrorist safe havens. India and Japan vowed to cooperate to tackle
    terrorist groups and the joint statement by the two countries mentioned names such as
    Al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba, and Jaish-e-Mohammed. The two leaders also demanded Pakistan to
    initiate action against terrorist outfits responsible for attacks in Mumbai (2008) and
    Pathankot (2016). Progress On India-Japan Trade Will Take Time
    to Fructify Though the India-Japan joint statement mentioned
    �enhancing free, fair and open trade�, the industry specific trade developments will
    take time to fructify. India�s trade with Japan fell 16 per cent
    in four years from 2013-14 to 2016-17, mostly on account of falling petroleum demand and
    prices. (Take a look at India’s major imports and
    exports with Japan here) Petroleum products like liquid paraffin, mineral
    oils and transformer oils form the highest exported component (at the 8-digit HS code
    level), but their exports to Japan have bottomed over the years, from more than a third of
    total exports at $2.4 billion to $70 million. By and large, this can be attributed to fallen
    oil prices and reduced demand from advanced economies, including Japan. On the other hand, petrochemical exports � especially
    those of naphtha and some oils � to Japan have improved, but there is a caveat. �Naphtha is getting exported without adding
    value domestically as a raw material,� Mahendra Singh, general secretary of the Chemicals
    and Petrochemicals Manufacturer�s Association (CPMA) of India told Business Standard. Throwing the Doors Open for Japanese Industrial
    Townships and Expats With India and Japan declaring that the key
    to global economic progress lies in the development of both the Indian and Pacific Ocean regions,
    PM Modi on Thursday invited more Japanese investments in India even as agreements were
    announced for setting up four Japanese industrial townships in India. “Today, four locations have been announced… Gujarat, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil
    Nadu… for setting up Japanese industrial townships,” Modi said on Thursday in his address
    at the India-Japan Business Plenary, which was held
    in Gandhinagar.

    China’s New “Silk Road”: Future MEGAPROJECTS
    Articles, Blog

    China’s New “Silk Road”: Future MEGAPROJECTS

    August 18, 2019


    Having recently completed both the world’s
    most extensive system of expressways and the planet’s longest high speed rail network,
    China is now looking beyond its borders for opportunities to keep building. President Xi Jinping announced at a recent
    summit that Beijing has sealed megaproject deals with 65 countries throughout Eurasia
    and Africa to construct ports, power stations, rail lines, roads, and all the tunnels and
    bridges needed to connect them back to mainland China. At a total cost of over $1 trillion, the One
    Belt, One Road initiative is unprecedented in size and scope. So is the bold funding mechanism: China will
    use its large, state-run banks to provide most of the financing, a risky move, when
    you consider how few of the nations in the O.B.O.R. could afford something like this
    on their own. “Oh,” say the leaders of economically-challenged,
    underdeveloped Laos, Yemen, or Ethiopia — or the blood-soaked regime of Bashar al-Assad
    in war-ravaged Syria — “you want to loan us billions of dollars to build some cool
    stuff in our countries? Of course, why not!?” China is hard-selling the project as a way
    to boost its westward connections, an update of the silk road trade route that played a
    significant role in developing China and the rest of the region 1,000 years ago. But many analysts see this comparison as little
    more than a marketing pitch. Al Jazeera clip: “Is the real point of this,
    East-West service then simply to boost China’s westward connections? [Pauline Loong] “Well I wouldn’t say simply
    to boost China’s westward connections, but I totally agree with Charles that it’s more
    a PR stunt. To call it the “Silk Road,” that’s really
    brilliant—evocative of romantic camel travels in the past. When, you know, you have these lovely silks
    and trade and so forth. And it’s good, because look at all the headlines
    it has been getting, but in practical terms, it’s early days yet.” [Bryce] Aside from the lessons China learned
    from its own recent infrastructure boom, Beijing is also drawing inspiration from the American
    Marshall Plan which financed the rebuilding of Western Europe after it was decimated during
    the second world war. That program was worth the equivalent of $130
    billion in today’s dollars and ensured the US had reliable export markets for the manufactured
    goods and machinery its growing economy had become dependent on producing. China’s modern version — first announced
    in 2013 — is the signature initiative of President Xi Jinping. Several projects have already been completed. Earlier this year London became the 15th European
    city connected directly to China through an ever-expanding global rail system, meaning
    freight trains loaded with goods can now arrive after a 12,000km journey all the way from
    the east coast of the landmass. And, at a cost of $4 billion, China also just
    completed Africa’s first transnational electric railway, which runs 466 miles from Djibouti
    to Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia. Chinese companies designed the system, built
    the line, and supplied the train cars. The many other projects under the O.B.O.R.
    umbrella include: A $6 billion, 260-mile railway connecting
    eight Asian countries. Desperately needed power plants to address
    Pakistan’s chronic electricity shortage, part of a larger $46 billion investment by
    China in Pakistan aimed at offsetting the American and Japanese-backed building boom
    happening in neighboring India, China and Pakistan’s mutual rival. Train lines will connect Budapest to Belgrade,
    Serbia, providing another artery for Chinese goods to reach Europe after arriving in a
    Chinese-owned port in Greece. And — in a move that adds prestige to O.B.O.R. — China is financing more than a third of
    the $23.7 billion cost of the Hinkley Point C nuclear power plant in southwest England. Part of the challenge in analyzing whether
    this building boom is ultimately good for the world is its sheer complexity. Nothing like this has ever been done before
    in human history. Yes, providing underdeveloped countries a
    chance to have better transportation infrastructure, or cleaner power plants is a good thing. But, by funding infrastructure that’s designed
    to enhance commerce and trade — instead of basic services many of these countries
    need more, like clean drinking water, affordable housing, and better education — China’s
    motives seem to favor the wealthy, elite business class. Here are other factors that explain why China
    is undertaking a project of this magnitude: The Communist Party has staked its reputation
    on non-stop economic growth. Since they hold all the power, the Chinese
    people expect them to deliver. But with its domestic megaproject boom nearing
    completion, China must find new buyers for all the steel, cement, and construction machinery
    its economy produces, or many of its factories could grind to a halt. It has decided the solution is One Belt, One
    Road, but lending hundreds of billions of dollars to many countries with weak credit
    ratings and unstable political systems is very risky. Which reveals an underlying sense you get
    when you look closely at One Belt One Road: China’s increasing desperation. The country’s national debt is already very
    high, but borrowing continues to accelerate at historic levels as state owned banks loan
    more and more money to state owned companies. The prime example of the risks associated
    with the tight rope the Communist Party is trying to walk was the government bailouts
    issued during China’s recent stock market collapse. That crisis was caused by the same sense of
    impatience that’s driving O.B.O.R.—the Party’s need to feed the insatiable economic
    growth monster. Using its powerful propaganda machine, Beijing
    urged its own people to invest their savings heavily in its immature, unstable market—causing
    inexperienced citizens to treat investments in companies like bets at a casino, creating
    a huge bubble that, naturally, burst. The government then suspended trading for
    a while and pumped billions into the system to avoid a total collapse. So really, when you step back, the core motivation
    for One Belt, One Road boils down to the Communist Party’s need to buy itself more time in
    order to come up with its next scheme to prop up the economy, because when it inevitably
    slows down, which it’s already starting to do, the Party’s promise to deliver a
    fantastic economic dream world will have been proven false for everyone in China but the
    elites. The silver lining is that many of the ventures
    China has undertaken will pay long-term dividends, like building up its high-tech manufacturing
    sector, with the anticipation that when OBOR’s transportation networks are complete, it will
    be ready to use them to deliver higher-cost goods like iPhones, drones, and green energy
    technologies to the rest of the world. The other major motivating factor here is
    the unmistakable opportunity to gain even-power status with the United States in Asia. The election of Donald Trump, and then his
    decision to walk away from the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal that would have hurt
    China, are massive geopolitical mistakes—completely unforced errors that China intends to take
    full advantage of. When it first announced the O.B.O.R. back
    in 2013, Barack Obama had just begun his second term and the US pivot to Asia was in full
    force. With rivals like Japan, South Korea, and Vietnam
    challenging China’s efforts to control maritime trade routes, it was clear China was being
    hemmed in on its Eastern flank. Despite the election of Trump, this is still
    true. So by instead turning instead to the vast
    land mass to the west for new opportunities, China minimizes its reliance on maritime trade
    routes that could be cut off in the event of a destabilizing military conflict. At the end of the day, China is all about
    business. It doesn’t matter if you’re a democracy,
    a dictatorship, or a failed state, China wants to work with you. But this willingness to embrace some of the
    world’s more unsavory characters could backfire. Just look who Xi is sitting next to at the
    O.B.O.R. summit: Russia’s Vladimir Putin and Turkey’s Erdogan—two men who look
    more and more like dictators clinging to power with each passing day. That’s not a good look for China, and it
    reminds us that the Communist Party is even less transparent. But in a world where the President of the
    United States is a bumbling fool, these partnerships create much less of an image problem now than
    they would have just a few months ago, when the widely admired Barack Obama was leading
    the free world. If you ask the Chinese, the O.B.O.R. is all
    about peace, an embrace of the concept of coop-etition. A generation ago it was unthinkable for a
    country to invest billions of dollars on infrastructure in another country, but in our hyper-globalized
    world, dominated by interconnected markets, it may become the norm, especially when we
    consider the intangible benefits—greater economic interdependence lowers the risk that
    groups of countries will want to fight with other groups of countries, many of whom are
    bound together by military alliances. Every one of these projects increases China’s
    soft power, giving Beijing more and more leverage in any future negotiation or military conflict. The many foreign seaports it will build and
    manage for the next half century will be particularly valuable chess pieces. Its understandable that Chinese policymakers
    are romanticizing One Belt, One Road as a crowning achievement for their nation—further
    recognition that it has regained its former status as a great civilization that deserves
    recognition around the world. But the reality is that it still has a long
    way to go. Combined, the following factors may weaken
    the optimistic sales pitches being made to foreign officials: a recent Oxford business
    school study argued that half of Chinese domestic megaprojects actually destroyed, not generated
    economic value; a few of China’s previous efforts to build megaprojects in foreign countries
    — like the A2 motorway in Poland — failed miserably; landowners and their representatives
    in the national assemblies of host countries are pushing back hard against attempts to
    take away their land; and public demonstrations against some the projects are beginning to
    take root, and spread. Another dose of reality that should sober
    Beijing is that— after analyzing China’s overleveraged financial position — its credit
    rating was just downgraded by a major agency, whose analysts concluded that its borrowing
    is raising red flags, and its economic growth will continue to slow down. Of course, none of these speed bumps is going
    to stop the Communist Party from attempting to execute their great leap. They are committed 100% to embracing a fundamental
    history lesson — one we were all reminded of by Brexit’s improbable win and the unlikely
    ascendence of Donald Trump — that fortune favors the bold—at least, in the short run. Thanks for watching. Get caught up on all of China’s major domestic
    megaprojects with the mini-documentary I made last year, which started some interesting
    conversations. To learn even more, and to support our work,
    sign up for a free 30-trial of Audible.com — linked below — and you’ll get one
    free audio download, like the great courses on The Fall and Rise of China. Until next time, for TDC, I’m Bryce Plank.