Browsing Tag: hong kong tramways

    香港電車 101 底盤測驗 Hong Kong Tramways #101 Chassis Trial
    Articles, Blog

    香港電車 101 底盤測驗 Hong Kong Tramways #101 Chassis Trial

    October 22, 2019


    101 Chassis Trial Hennesy Road to Percival Street (Happy Valley bound) The new chassis designed by Hong Kong Tramways Ltd. The wheels and brake system provided by CRRC Corporation Ltd. The chassis generates bigger noise
    when the wheels friction with the track. Wong Nai Chung Road (Happy Valley bound) The new chassis’ sound different with the older trams’ chassis Tin Lok Lane to Hennesy Road Tram #10 was following tram #101 For pushing the tram #101 when emergency Hong Kong Tramways retrofits the junction rail track to minimize noise.

    Hong Kong | Tramways “Ding Ding” – Getting Around | Travel Guide | Episode# 4
    Articles, Blog

    Hong Kong | Tramways “Ding Ding” – Getting Around | Travel Guide | Episode# 4

    October 17, 2019


    Hipfig Travel Channel offers travel video
    guides for more than 20 cities in Asia, US, and Canada. If you like our travel videos
    subscribe to this channel to see more Welcome to Hipfig’s Video Guide Series
    on Hong Kong. In this video will show you the Hong Kong Tramways also known as a
    Ding Ding and show you how to get around Hong Kong Island side using the Hong
    Kong Trams. Hong Kong Tramway is also known as a Ding Ding was founded in 1904.
    Currently there’s 163 tram cars including two antique trams. Hong Kong
    Trams only runs on the Hong Kong Island side. The Trams are called Ding Ding
    because of the constant noisy ding ding noise they make along their route.
    Passengers should board from the back and exit from the front of a tram. You
    pay when you exit from the front of the tram next to the driver. You can pay your
    fare in exact change or tap your Octopus Card Children below the age of 12 are half-price and children below the age of
    3 are free if accompanied by an adult and they don’t occupy a seat. The Ding Ding has six routes which mostly overlap. Visitors find these routes most helpful
    Kennedy Town (West) to Shau Kei Wan ( East) is the main line that goes all the way across Hong
    Kong Island side. The Skek Tong Tsui to North Point is a shorter route of the main
    line starting at Skek Tong Tsui to North Point. The Kennedy Town to Happy
    Valley overlaps the main line from Kennedy Town to Causeway Bay and then
    loops around Happy Valley Stadium which is a horse race racing area. Happy Valley
    to Shau Kei Wan overlaps from Causeway Bay all the way to Shau Kei Wan. The Tram has a 13
    kilometer route that goes from Kennedy Town on to the west to Shau Kei Wan in
    the east with over a hundred stops. Some useful stops on the main line are:
    Central, Admiralty, Wan Chai, and Causeway Bay At the Central stop there’s the Star Ferry,
    Peak Tram, Statue Square, and Soho area At the Admiralty stop there’s Pacific Place, at Wan Chai there’s shopping and nightlife. At Causeway Bay there’s SOGO, Victoria Park, and Times Square Happy Travels Go to hipfig.com for more information or go to our Hipfig Travel
    Channel on YouTube and be sure to subscribe for regular updates

    Hong Kong | Public Transportation Info – Getting Around | Travel Guide | Episode# 6
    Articles, Blog

    Hong Kong | Public Transportation Info – Getting Around | Travel Guide | Episode# 6

    September 5, 2019


    Hip Fig Travel Channel offers Travel
    Video Guides for more than 20 cities in Asia, US , and Canada. If you like our
    travel videos subscribe to this channel to see more. Welcome to Hipfig’s Video
    Guide Series on Hong Kong. In this video we’ll be showing you the various modes
    of transportation in Hong Kong including the MTR buses, the ding-ding (Trams), Star Ferry, and taxis. The MTR or the subway is the fastest and an economical and easy way
    to get around Hong Kong. You can recognize subway stations’ entrances and exits by the red logo with the spider looking symbol. All signs are in English
    and in Chinese. Announcements in the MTR station are in English and in Cantonese
    and Mandarin. You can purchase your single journey ticket at any vending
    machine at any MTR station. A single journey ticket is a one-way ride to a
    pre-selected destination on the day of purchase. The fare is based on the
    distance traveled. An easier, efficient and faster way to pay for fares is a
    reloadable Octopus card. The Octopus card is a reusable stored valued card for
    making electronic payments in Hong Kong You can buy a reloadable Octopus card at
    any MTR station or convenience stores like 7-11. To use your Octopus card
    at MTR stations, tap your Octopus card over the fare deducting reader when you
    enter and exit at any MTR station. If you have a single journey ticket insert your
    ticket. There is also a discount on fares for using Octopus cards over a single
    journey ticket. You can purchase Octopus cards with the $50 HKD
    refundable deposit with different amounts of stored value in $50 HKD increments. The cost is discounted for children and seniors. You can get
    your deposit back when you return your card to an any customer service
    counter. For more information about the Octopus card visit their website or go
    to the hipfig link below in the description. At each MTR station
    platform and on trains, you will find route maps and signs for the exit in
    English and in Chinese. Once you find your platform, wait in the queue until
    the trains arrive. Let passengers off first then go into the train. If there
    are no seats, stand somewhere so that you can see the trains progress on the route
    map located near each door. Please be aware of your things and kids as the
    trains can get very crowded during peak hours. The MTR has 12 lines and the
    Airport Express trains. Most attractions are along 3 MTR lines: the Tsuen Wan or red MTR subway line, the Island line also known as the blue line, and the Tung
    Chung line also known as the orange line. The Tsuen Wan or red MTR subway line is
    used to travel around the Kowloon side and connects to the Hong Kong Island
    side at Central and Admiralty stations It travels between Central, Tsim Tsa Tsui, Jordan, Mong Kok, and Tsuen Wan . Major stops on the red line are Tsim Tsau
    Tsui station where you can reach the Peninsula hotel or the Avenue of the
    Stars. The Island line or the blue line is the main line to use on the Hong Kong
    Island side. It travels between Kennedy Town station through Central, Admiralty,
    Wan Chai, and Causeway Bay all the way to Chai Wan. Central Station, Admiralty
    station, and Causeway Bay station are popular stops on this island line. The
    third line is the Tung Chung line or the orange line which starts at Hong Kong
    station and goes through Kowloon and Sunny Bay station
    and ends in Tung Chung station. Take this line to the Big Buddha and Ngong Ping
    360. At Sunny Bay Transfer to the Resort line or pink line for Disneyland.
    The newest line is the South Island line which starts from Admiralty station and
    goes to Ocean Park station all the way to South Horizon stop. Use this line to
    get to Ocean Park. Please be aware that MTR stations do not
    have restrooms, no food or drink is allowed on MTR trains, with the exception
    of Airport Express- large luggage is not allowed on MTR trains. Please make a note that from each
    station there can be many exits which can be confusing to find the right exit
    for your destination. If you’re not sure of your exit , look for the exit signs and
    neighborhood map indicating which exit to take after you exit the platform area.
    If you need assistance, ask at the manned booth located at the MTR entry/exit
    gates . Not all exits and entrances have elevators or escalators and will require
    you to take stairs. Hong Kong Buses Buses in Hong Kong are an easy method of getting around town. They are frequent, inexpensive, comfortable, and most are
    air-conditioned, and go everywhere in Hong Kong. In Hong Kong
    private companies run public bus service There are five major bus companies the
    Kowloon motor bus company (KMB), the City bus company, the New World first bus
    company, and the Long Win bus company and the New Lantau bus company. The
    Kowloon Motor Company or KMB provides service mainly in the Kowloon area and
    in the new territories. You have a few routes operating cross harbour to the
    Hong Kong Island side. KMB has over 400 routes in Hong Kong.
    City bus operates mainly on the Hong Kong Island side, Bus Number 15 goes to
    Victoria Peak from Central Station. New world bus company provides bus service
    mainly on the Hong Kong Island side and also has routes in Kowloon and the New
    Territories. You can pay for fares with exact change or with an Octopus card Destinations and bus numbers are
    displayed in English and Chinese on front of each bus. Bus stops clearly
    display the bus numbers and the route maps encased in a plastic box. Once at
    your bus stop, wait in line and enter from the front. Pay with exact change or
    tap your Octopus card if you have one Prices are displayed on the fare box.
    If you’re going a short distance make sure to ride a bus that ends at your
    destination or nearby otherwise you’ll end up paying more because fares are
    based on the end destination. The majority of bus fare rates are based on
    where you board to the last stop of the bus route and not where you get off. Bus
    rides themselves can be an experience especially on the top in the front row
    of a double-decker bus coming from places like Stanley or Victoria Peak. Pay
    attention for your stop on the screen in the bus. To exit your bus make sure to
    press the red button to tell the driver to stop before your destination. Exit
    from the back. Another kind of bus in Hong Kong are mini buses or public light
    buses. Mini buses are small buses run by independent operators . They usually have
    a capacity of up to 16 passengers and no standing passengers are allowed. there
    are two types of mini buses: green and red topped. The green colored top mini
    buses run a fixed route at fixed prices You can pay by exact change or with an
    Octopus card Red-colored minibuses do not have fixed
    routes, schedules, or fares and passengers can get off and on anywhere along the
    route . They are more like a shared taxi.
    You can pay by exact change but only a few
    accept Octopus cards. The buses are slightly more expensive but they tend to
    be faster and more efficient since they operate on diverse routes. Another convenieniet bus
    option for tours are the hop on hop off buses by Big Bus. Big Bus operates
    three routes in Hong Kong. You’ll also see Panda buses on the Kowloon side
    These are for tourists from Japan and tickets must be purchased in Japan
    before arrival. Another transportation option in Hong Kong are the Hong
    Kong tramways or ding-dings. Hong Kong Tramways also known as ding-dings
    was founded in 1904. Currently there’s 163 tram cars including two antique
    trams. Hong Kong Trams operate only on the Hong Kong Island side. The trams or
    ding-dings are cheap and easy option to get around Hong Kong. These double-decker
    trams are one of the oldest forms of transport in Hong Kong. The Trams are
    called ding-dings because of the constant noisy ding ding noise they make
    along their route. You can pay your fare in exact change or tap your Octopus card.
    Passengers should board from the back and exit from the front of the tram. You
    pay when you exit from the front of the tram next to the driver. Children under
    12 are charged half fare and children below the age of 3 are free with an
    adult if they’re not occupying a seat. The Hong Kong Tram is a total of 13
    kilometers. It goes from Kennedy town on the west to Shau Kei Wan in the East with
    over a hundred stops. It has six routes which mostly overlap. Visitors will
    find these routes most helpful: the Kennedy Town to Shau Kei Wan is the main line
    which goes all the way across Hong Kong Island. The Shek Tong Sui to North point
    is a shorter route of the main line starting at Shek Tong Tsui to North Point,
    the Kennedy Town to Happy Valley- overlaps
    the main line from Kennedy town to Causeway Bay and then loops around Happy Valley Stadium which is the horse racing area. Then you have the Happy Valley to
    Shau Kei Wan which overlaps from Causeway Bay all the way to Shau Kei Wan.
    My favorite way to get around Hong Kong is the Star Ferry. The Star Ferry is a
    commuter and tour ferry service in Hong Kong . I’s a fun and inexpensive way to
    spend time in the water and go across the harbour. The Star Ferry links
    Tsim-sha-tsui on the Kowloon side with Central and Wan Chai on the Hong Kong
    Island side. It’s about a 15 minute ride on the Star Ferry across the harbour. To
    get to the ferry on the Kowloon side from Tsim TsauTsui MTR station, take exit L6 and walk to the clock tower along Salisbury Road to the Star Ferry Pier
    and follow the signs to get to the ferry. On the Hong Kong Island side at Wan
    Chai, from Wan Chai MTR station take exit A1. Take the Skybridge to the Hong
    Kong Convention and Exhibition Center and walk to the Ferry. To get to the ferry on the Hong
    Kong Island side at Central, from Hong Kong MTR station- take exit A2 or from
    the MTR Central Station and take Exit A and walk to the pier along Man Yiu street to the
    Central Pier. There are also other many other companies at Central Ferry Piers
    which you can take to outlying islands like Lantau, Lamma, and Park Island. You can
    pay with exact change or with an Octopus card. A convenient way to get around Hong
    Kong are taxicabs. Taxis in Hong Kong are color coded according to their operating
    areas. You can find taxi cabs in abundance throughout Hong Kong. All taxis
    in Hong Kong are metered, air-conditioned, and clean. Red coloured taxis are urban
    taxis which serve all destinations throughout Hong Kong including the
    airport except Tung Chung road and roads in South Lantau – this is probably the
    color taxi you will use most. Taxis are easily hailed along the street except in
    certain restricted areas. In peak hours you might see taxi cues in front of
    hotels or taxi stands. Taxis are required to use the taxi meter. Happy Travels Go to Hipfig.com for more information or go to our Hipfig Travel Channel on
    YouTube and be sure to subscribe for regular updates