Browsing Tag: for

    African American history embedded in B&O railroad
    Articles, Blog

    African American history embedded in B&O railroad

    August 12, 2019


    ARTIFACTS ON DISPLAY. JENNIFER: THE B AND O RAILROAD
    BEGAN IN 1828, AND INSIDE THE
    MUSEUM ON PRATT STREET, YOU’LL
    FIND PEICES THAT DEPICT ITS
    HISTORY IN MARYLAND AND ACROSS
    THE COUNTRY. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY BEGINS
    HERE DURING THE CIVIL WAR, WHEN
    RUNAWAY SLAVES BECAME WHAT’S
    KNOWN AS CONTRABAND SOLDIERS PUT
    TO WORK BY THE UNION ARMY.>>TOOK THOSE GUYS, MADE THEM
    WORKERS PAID THEM, GAVE THEM
    , CLOTHING, HAD THEM HELP
    REBUILD RAILROADS OR REBUILD
    WALLS. RINGS LIKE THAT. JENNIFER: IF YOU WANT TO SEE
    WHAT TRAVEL WAS LIKE FOR AFRICAN
    AMERICANS POST CIVIL WAR JUST
    STEP INSIDE THIS RAIL CAR WHERE
    YOU CAN SEE HOW THE SEATING’S
    BEEN CHANGED TO ACCOMMODATE SEGREGATION. JIM CROW LAWS EXPANSIVE SEATING
    IN THE REAR FOR WHITE TRAVELERS
    WITH LIMITED SEATING FOR BLACK
    PASSENGERS,CLOSE TO THE FREIGHT
    AREA AND NEXT TO THE STOVE.>>IT IS PROBABLY BLAZING HOT
    AND NOT COMFORTABLE. NOT THE BEST SEATING. IT IS A LITTLE DIFFERENT THAN
    THE OTHER. IT MAKES YOU FEEL LESS OF A
    HUMAN BEING FOR SURE. JENNIFER: IT WAS IN THE 1880’S
    AND 1890’S WHEN AFRICAN
    AMERICANS PLAYED A SIGNIGICANT
    ROLE IN THE RAIL SERVICE
    INDUSTRY. PULLMAN CARS WERE IN STYLE. THINK FANCY TRAVEL FOR THE
    WEALTHY, WITH THE FIRST SLEEPER
    CARS. THEY WANTED PASSENGERS TO HAVE
    TOP-NOTCH SERVICE.>>THE PULLMAN COMPANY MADE SU
    ON ALL THOSE CARS WERE PORTERS. PRETTY MUCH ALL OF THEM WERE
    AFRICAN AMERICANS ALL THROUGH
    THE COUNTRY. FOLKS WHO WOULD HELP THE
    TRAVELERS GET WHAT THEY NEEDED,
    SET UP THE BEDS, CARRY THEIR
    BAGS, THINGS LIKE THAT. THE RED CAPS WERE THE ONES
    HELPING AT THE STATION AND
    LOADING IN THE BAGS. ON THE TRAIN ALL THE PULLMAN
    PORTERS WERE IN THE WHITE COATS
    WITH THE BLACK TIES. THEY STOOD UP SO YOU KNEW WHO
    THEY WERE. JENNIFER: THE RAIL INDUSTRY
    WOULD KNOW THEM WELL FOR ANOTHER
    REASON.

    The 10 Most Dangerous Jobs In The World
    Articles, Blog

    The 10 Most Dangerous Jobs In The World

    August 12, 2019


    [Music] the 10 most dangerous jobs in the world underwater welder underwater welders face a series of dangers on the job every day including the risk of shock explosion decompression sickness and even wear on their dental fillings about 30 welders die out of 200 welders on the job annually crab fishermen 128 Alaskan crab fishermen died in 2007 alone which is 26 times more dangerous than the average job 80% of fatalities are due to hypothermia or being thrown overboard and drowning crab fishermen also suffer from serious injuries due to heavy machinery and gear loggers the logging industry has some of the highest work-related fatalities in the country with loggers being 30 times more likely to die on the job than most other career fields the majority of logging related deaths comes from equipment errors or trees falling on workers microchip manufacturers computer chips are created with numerous hazardous chemicals including arsenic and while manufacturing chips may not be immediately fatal there are long-term effects to health such as high rates of miscarriages birth defects cancer and respiratory illnesses bush pilots bush pilots have more risks in their career for less pay than average commercial pilots with a rate of 13 point 59 accidents for a hundred thousand flight hours the general aviation accident rate for pilots in Alaska is two times higher than pilots in the rest of the US [Music] bull riders bull riding his search in popularity since the 1990s with promises of big money for an eight-second ride but bull riders can suffer at least one significant injury per every 15 events they partake in including concussions broken bones and fractures which may not be worth of potential cash payout Steel Workers all those safety harnesses have been implemented Steel Workers still risk a fall from great heights the job also includes risk of serious injury from steel beams or walls collapsing on workers in 2005 Steel Workers still had a fatality rate of 56 deaths per 100,000 workers oil riggers most offshore oil riggers work 16-hour shifts often with very little sleep fires and oil rig explosions topped the list for job-related dangers with the rate of 27.1 deaths per hundred thousand offshore workers annually prostitutes prostitutes always run the risk of being arrested for selling sexual favors to John’s but even more dangerous are the threats of STDs rape and even physical assault or death the death rate for prostitutes is 204 deaths for every $100,000 snake milking is a dangerous yet completely necessary job that saves numerous lives per year while there are safety procedures in place each milking procedure has a high risk factor in fact snake milking has a low rate of people who have not been bitten while on the job [Music]

    Erwin and former employees moving forward after CSX lays off hundreds in 2015
    Articles, Blog

    Erwin and former employees moving forward after CSX lays off hundreds in 2015

    August 11, 2019


    A TOWN IS IN RECOVERY MODE AFTER LOSING HUNDREDS OF JOBS AND A MAJOR INDUSTRY. C-S-X SHUT DOWN ITS ERWIN RAILYARD, CUTTING ALMOST 300 JOBS IN OCTOBER 2015. NEWS CHANNEL 11’S ALLIE HINDS JOINS US LIVE IN ERWIN WHERE SHE FOUND OUT HOW THE TOWN AND FORMER EMPLOYEES ARE MOVING FORWARD MORE THAN A YEAR AFTER THIS SHOCKING BLOW. I’M HERE IN ERWIN THIS IS THE RAILYARD BEHIND ME…RIGHT IN THE HEART OF TOWN..THIS INDUSTRY WAS THE LIFEBLOOD HERE FOR DECADES. BACK IN 2015 I TALKED WITH SEVERAL EMPLOYEES SHOCKED AT THE CLOSURE, PREDICTING THEIR LIVES WERE GOING TO DRAMATICALLY CHANGE BECAUSE OF IT.. SO WE CHECKED IN WITH THEM A YEAR AND A HALF LATER…THEY SAY THEIR PREDICTIONS CAME TRUE. (CSX PKG:00:32:26) “IM A FIFTH GENERATION RAILROADER HERE IN UNICOI COUNTY.” THIS IS MICHAEL ALLEN JUST A FEW DAYS AFTER HE FOUND OUT HE’D BE LOSING HIS JOB AT C-S-X HERE IN ERWIN.. (CSX PKG :01:16:12) “NOBODY HAS A CLUE WHATS GOING TO HAPPEN” ALLEN SAYS HE COULDN’T FIND A JOB UNTIL AUGUST OF 2016 WHEN HE DECIDED TO WORK AT CSX IN WEST VIRGINIA… (:12:41:25) “ERWIN IS WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED AND IT’S A BIG CHANGE YOU KNOW TO HAVE TO STEP OUT AND IT’S HARD ON ME AND HARD ON MY FAMILY” WE CAUGHT UP WITH ALLEN ON OVER THE PHONE IN HIS KENTUCKY APARTMENT WHERE HE LIVES DURING THE WEEK. (12:43:53) “IT WAS DEFINITELY LIFE-CHANGING” WITH HIS WHOLE FAMILY STILL IN ERWIN, HE COMMUTES FOUR HOURS HOME AND FOUR HOURS BACK EVERY WEEKEND. (12:44:12) “IT’S HARD BEING AWAY FROM YOUR FAMILY ALL WEEK LONG BUT I ALWAYS SAY ME AND MY WIFE WE ALWAYS TELL EACH OTHER THAT THINGS COULD ALWAYS BE WORSE” BACK IN 2015…NOT ONLY WAS ALLEN UNCERTAIN ABOUT HIS FUTURE, HE WAS CONCERNED FOR THE FUTURE OF HIS HOMETOWN. (CSX PKG 00:41:24) “THIS TOWN WAS BUILT BY THE RAILROAD, AND THIS TOWN MAY GO DOWN WITH THE RAILROAD” BUT ERWIN MAYOR DORIS HENSLEY SAYS THEY ARE MAKING SURE THAT DOESN’T HAPPEN. (HENSLEY) “WE ARE TRYING TO ATTRACT NEW BUSINESSES, WERE TRYING TO START A NEW MOVEMENT FOR TOURISM IN TOWN, AS WELL AS A DRAW FOR RETAIL” SHE SAYS SINCE THE CLOSURE, ABOUT 10 SMALL BUSINESSES HAVE OPENED UP DOWNTOWN, AND SHE HOPES THAT TREND CONTINUES. (HENSLEY) “SINCE THEN IN OCTOBER 2015 OUR UNEMPLOYMENT RATE WAS 7.3%, OCTOBER 2016 IT WAS 6.6% SO WE CAN SEE THAT WE’RE IN THE RECOVERY MODE RIGHT NOW” AS FOR ALLEN, HE SAYS HE IS ALSO TRYING TO KEEP MOVING FORWARD, LOOKING AT THE BRIGHT SIDE. “I STILL THANK THE LORD EVERY DAY THAT HE HAS BLESSED ME WITH A GOOD JOB IT’S JUST KIND OF INCONVENIENT FOR ME BUT MY INCONVENIENCE ALSO IS A BLESSING” AS FOR THIS BUILDING BEHIND ME, MAYOR HENSLEY SAYS IT STILL BELONGS TO C-S-X..AND SHE’S NOT SURE WHAT THE FUTURE LOOKS LIKE FOR THIS PROPERTY. BUT SHE SAYS THERE ARE OTHER AREAS FOR DEVELOPMENT. SINCE 2015 THE TOWN HAS RECEIVED TWO GRANTS, ONE THAT WILL HELP IDENTIFY AND MARKET THE AVAILABLE PROPERTIES IN ERWIN. THE OTHER WILL DEMOLISH AN OLD BUILDING HERE IN ERWIN AND MAKE IT SITE READY FOR NEW DEVELOPMENT. ENDING BUT STAYING CLOUDY THIS MORNING WITH A MOSTLY

    Articles

    B&O Railroad Museum TV Network: Dining on the B&O (February 2014)

    August 11, 2019


    Hi, I’m Michael Gross, host of the B&O
    Railroad Museum Television Network. African-American waiters and commissary staff who worked on B&O dining cars were renowned for their top-notch
    customer service. The B&O’s employee magazine
    was constantly filled with complimentary letters extolling their qualities and the B&O’s reputation for elegant
    cuisine and high standards of service. The compliments were well-earned and well-deserved when one considers the physical conditions of a cramped dining car racing down the tracks and the challenges faced by the
    B&O chefs and waiters. The opportunity to work as
    a waiter or chef for the B&O provided an avenue of
    advancement for black men not widely available to African-Americans
    in general in the early 20th century. B&O waiter Reverend James Kearse considered it a “privilege to assist
    passengers” for the railroad. He received impeccable training
    and worked in an “exacting world, where the railroad waiters were expected
    to keep their shoes polished, pants pressed, hair groomed, and fingernails clean.” Many served as career employees with 20, 30
    or more years of dedicated service. The courteous, reliable, and precise waiters of the B&O also served as a recognizable face of
    the railroad’s advertising campaign. The friendly smile of the staff in the neat, clean, pressed white linen uniforms, offered the finest fair the B&O had to offer. Their smiles were seen as part of the uniform and often hid the long hours spent on their feet serving thousands of hungry travelers. In addition to waiting tables,
    waiters were responsible for: cleaning and setting tables before
    and between meals; placing table cloths, napkins, and place settings; and ensuring the dishes and silver
    were clean and free of fingerprints. Additional duties included prepping
    salads and washing dishes. Preparing food for passengers
    was always difficult, at best, but dining car chefs faced
    the added challenge of cramped quarters, rocking tables,
    and a kitchen on wheels that moved at speed of 80 to 100 mph. Just imagine preparing and
    serving Thanksgiving dinner for countless travelers in a kitchen
    the size of a closet being shared by several cooks, much less carrying a tray full of food at high speeds with the rhythmic motion of the car under your feet. This is exactly what B&O waiters had to do
    all along the railroad’s line, often serving as many as 450 meals on one train. Stay tuned for information on upcoming
    events at the B&O Railroad Museum. Thomas the Tank Engine’s visiting
    B&O Railroad Museum, April 25-27 and May 2-4 with a trainload of family fun! Kids of all ages can enjoy a ride with
    Thomas the Tank Engine and meet Sir Topham Hatt! There’ll be storytelling, live entertainment,
    and much, much more. Tickets are on sale now at ticketweb.com/dowt or call 1-866-468-7630. Don’t miss Day Out With Thomas:
    The Go-Go Thomas Tour! Promotional opportunities were few for
    African-American waiters. The dining car stewards were all white men who oversaw the operation of each B&O dining car. African-Americans could be promoted
    to Waiter in Charge with the responsibility for running Club Cars, Observation Cars, and smaller dining cars. Waiters in Charge could have as many as three waiters and cooks under their supervision. They waited tables as needed and if working the Club Car also served
    as bartender and short order cook preparing a light fare such as
    breakfast and sandwiches. Waiters and chefs on the B&O
    faced discrimination, derogatory comments, institutional racism,
    and had very limited privileges. They were not admitted to the
    African-American Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters for many years and had no representation for salary issues, seniority,
    and other working condition protections. Benefits could be arbitrarily taken from them. Waiters often had to sleep in the dining car and received 8 hours of pay,
    even if they worked longer shifts. When they finally could join the Brotherhood, they were given access to sleeping berths and received extra pay for working longer hours. These conditions began to change
    during the Civil Rights era as America was forced to confront racism; however, conditions remained less than ideal and doors that remained closed to
    African-Americans took some time to open wider. When factoring in their ability to work
    in a racially charged environment and handle their duties African-American dining car staff of
    the B&O made the adage “Dinner the Diner, Nothing Could be Finer”
    a reality. When visiting the B&O Railroad Museum, be sure to visit the exhibit on
    African-American dining car service as well as the elegant collection
    of dining car china on display. This is Michael Gross, and thanks for watching the B&O Railroad Museum Television Network. Interested in learning more about the
    B&O Railroad Museum and Ellicott City Station? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter! With daily updates on upcoming events, coupons, photographs, history, and things to do in Baltimore, you’ll never be off track.

    Tri-Rail Double GP & At Different Railroad Crossings
    Articles, Blog

    Tri-Rail Double GP & At Different Railroad Crossings

    August 11, 2019


    Hello ladies and gentlemen, for those of you who don’t know Tri Rail is a commuter rail line that goes from Miami International Airport to WPB. It’s about 70 miles and has 18 stations in between. You’re going to see 4 different Tri Rails in this video. Enjoy! Wow, no gate runners in FT. Lauderdale! That’s nice. It’s going to be a Tri-Rail over here. train horn train horn Please Subscribe, Like, or share. Thank you for viewing guys. bye.

    Crews remove railroad tracks from road in Southampton
    Articles, Blog

    Crews remove railroad tracks from road in Southampton

    August 11, 2019


    MACHADO FOR 22 NEWS. BARRY: A SOUTHAMPTON ROAD WAS CLOSED TODAY SO CREWS COULD REMOVE RAILROAD TRACKS. 22NEWS REPORTER MIKE MASCIADRELLI JOINS US FROM OUR HAMPSHIRE COUNTY BUREAU TO TELL US WHAT MADE THIS PROJECT NECESSARY. MIKE: THE SOUTHAMPTON HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT WANTS TO MAKE THE ROAD SAFER FOR DRIVERS. BRICKYARD ROAD WAS CLOSED FOR MOST OF TUESDAY, WHILE CREWS REMOVED A SECTION OF RAILROAD TRACKS ON THE ROAD. THE SOUTHAMPTON HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT WORKED WITH CREWS FROM PINSLY RAILROAD COMPANY. BRICKYARD ROAD WAS CLOSED FROM VALLEY ROAD TO GILBERT ROAD. RESIDENTS WERE FORCED TO USE GILBERT ROAD TO GET HOME. THIS PROJECT WAS THE RESULT OF A COMPLAINT MADE BY A SOUTHAMPTON RESIDENT WHO CRASHED WHILE RIDING HIS BIKE OVER THE TRACKS. RANDALL KEMP: SUPERINTENDENT, SOUTHAMPTON HIGHWAY DEPT. IT WAS ADVANTAGEOUS FOR THEM TO REMOVE THEM, WE ADDRESS A CONCERN AS WELL AS GET THE BASE READY FOR A SMOOTH OVERLAY WHEN WE REPAVE THE ROAD. MIKE: KEMP TOLD 22NEWS THIS SECTION OF THE ROAD HAS BEEN FILLED WITH GRAVEL AND YOU’LL BE ABLE TO RIDE OVER IT TONIGHT. HE SAID THEY’LL PAVE IT NEXT WEEK TO ALLOW SOME TIME FOR THE GRAVEL TO SETTLE. MIKE: KEMP SAID ALL OF BRICKYARD ROAD WILL BE RE-PAVED IN THE NEXT COUPLE WEEKS. LIVE FROM THE HAMPSHIRE COUNTY BUREAU, IN NORTHAMPTON, MIKE

    Southwest Hits the Red Carpet at Sundance
    Articles, Blog

    Southwest Hits the Red Carpet at Sundance

    August 11, 2019


    >>Hi, Brooks Thomas at Sundance
    Film Festival 2013. Southwest Airlines is a proud sponsor. We got to do something really
    interesting this year. We got on the press lines to
    ask the actors and crew members of these movies what their travel quirks were.>>Ok, I have two baby pillows that I call
    Pookie Number One and Pookie Number Two.>>Ok.>>I have this thing from childhood
    where I always bring a deck of cards. I always feel like you never know
    when you need a deck of cards. Somebody once said to me if you’re ever stuck
    on a desert island you should play solitaire because somebody will always come up with
    you should put the jack on the three.>>It’s trouble. We have a lot of trouble with
    the rivalry between the Pookies.>>You know, you’re like pack the coat behind
    you and your scarf is your pillow, right?>>Are you a neck pillower?>>I’m not, but I can never
    figure out how to work them.>>One goes here and the other lays here, so –>>Why the front pillow?
    >>I’m like a sandwich. I need one for the neck, right? And then here to be like,
    shh, nobody talk to me or –>>I like to have my own pillow. I like very, very flat pillows, and usually
    luxurious hotels give you big fluffy pillows, but for some reason, because my
    head is bald or my neck is funny or something, I like very flat pillows.>>It’s the head shave do
    you think that does that?>>I don’t know if it’s that or maybe my head
    gets swelled so much from being an actor.>>I always bring too many books. I like, I have too many like big hard
    cover books and I’ve got an iPad, and I’m like should put my books in here,
    but I like the physical object too much, and so I’m always like have a
    backpack stuffed full of books.>>I [Inaudible] singing [Inaudible]. I always have [Inaudible]. I always have [Inaudible] oil and French Press.>>I think three times as many
    socks as you would think, you know, because that’s the one thing that just like keeps everybody sane when
    you’re in a crowded space.>>Socks?>>Yeah, just like clean feet. [ Host laughing ]>>A lot of boxers, a lot of underwear. I buy boxers and underwear compulsively
    because they always seem to disappear. And water and my [Inaudible]. That’s pretty much it.>>Oh my God! I’m in the movie!>>You’re in the movie. You got to go.>>Yeah. I got to go. >>I got to go.>>Alright. Well –>>Love you.>>We’ll miss you.

    Soo Line Railroad cab ride,  Bensenville, IL to Sabula, IA 1995
    Articles, Blog

    Soo Line Railroad cab ride, Bensenville, IL to Sabula, IA 1995

    August 11, 2019


    Soo Line SD40-2 6602 & GP40 4600, power for 437 west. Train crew: Tom Meirhoff, conductor and George Brinson, engineer. I was making a conductor territory familiarization trip. 473 proceeding to west end of Bensenville yard for departure. Note on right the long dormant steel water tower once used to supply water for Milwaukee Road steam locomotives. Hump yard movement signals for hump track leads. Metra “scoot” (commuter train) heading west on mainline. Actually, the recording came out pretty good considering the video camera technology for the time! Lunar (white) pot or dwarf signal giving permission to enter mainline tracks at restricted speed (actually, 10 mph yard speed). Control operator tower B 17 on right. Crossing over from two main to one main. Bensenville Metra depot. MP 17.2 Tower B 17 reported 437 has passed his tower location (entire train all on one main). Wood Dale Metra depot. MP 19.1 Itasca Metra depot. MP 21.0 Eastbound “scoot” on two main. Pingree Grove MP 41.9. Waiting for eastbound “Davis Turn” to pass on two main before proceeding west onto single track mainline. Spring switch set for eastbound trains to enter two main. A few miles west of Davis Junction at about MP 82.0 Bridge crossing Rock River (east of Byron, IL). Byron, IL. Where former CGW (Chicago Great Western Railroad) mainline crossed these tracks at grade. Eastbound train ahead in Adeline siding informing 437 crew that west end of siding switch is open (requiring 437 to stop and line west switch to proceed west). Trackside warning detector (hot box) MP 98.6 Trackside warning detector at MP 98.6 with automatic recording providing “no defects” for any defective journals (overheated wheel bearings or “hot box”). Approaching Adeline siding MP 101.3 with eastbound train “in the hole” (siding). Note hardly any graffiti painted on the sides of the freight cars. Today, you’d be hard pressed to find a freight car without any sort of graffiti!!! Approaching Savanna, IL and Mississippi River drawbridge. Savanna, IL MP 138.3 Burlington Northern Railroad (BNSF today) diamond (crossing at grade). Mississippi River on right. Sabula drawbridge over Mississippi River MP 140.8. Bridge operator’s shanty on left. Sabula, Iowa

    Search Resumes To Unearth The Remains Of Railroad Workers From 1832
    Articles, Blog

    Search Resumes To Unearth The Remains Of Railroad Workers From 1832

    August 11, 2019


    RADIO FOR CBS-3 “EYEWITNESS NEWS”. WELL, SEARCH IN THE MEANTIME DOES RESUME FOR DOZENS OF IRISH WORK HOURS DIED WHILE BUILDING PENNSYLVANIA’S FIRST RAILROAD ALONG THE MAIN LINE. TODAY A TEAM OF VOLUNTEERS EXPLORED DUFFY’S CUT ARCHEOLOGICAL DIG SITE IN EAST WHITELAND WITH THE GROUND RADAR. THEY ARE LOOKING FOR REMAINS OF 50 RAIL WORKERS FROM 1832, WHO ARE BELIEVED TO BE BURIED IN A MASS GRAVE.