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    The 10 Best Places To Live In Pennsylvania For 2018

    August 17, 2019


    Living in Pennsylvania puts outdoor lovers
    near trout-filled streams, scenic hikes and cross-country skiing trails. While Pittsburgh and Philadelphia offer urban
    environments loaded with entertainment options, much of Pennsylvania is made of up small towns
    and dense forest areas. Steel production, train manufacturing, banking
    and agriculture drive the economy in Pennsylvania. Here are the 10 best places to live in Pennsylvania: 1. Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh is on the verge of greater heights. Emerging from a dying steel industry, Pittsburgh
    is earning another name: reinvention city. Since the steel mills closed in the 1980s,
    Pittsburgh feels cleaner and full of energy. Pittsburgh now encompasses more acres of park
    per capita and trees per square mile than any other major US metro area,
    and it’s attracting major corporations looking to set up shop. A rise in job opportunities has made Pittsburgh
    an attractive place for families and graduates. Pittsburgh also offers a cheaper housing market
    and proximity to other large metro areas. Summers are hot and humid while winters are
    cold and snowy. Spring and autumn are unpredictable: frosty
    and cold in the mornings, warm and muggy in the afternoon. It’s one of the top 10 safest cities in Pennsylvania,
    as well as one of the most affordable. 2. Philadelphia. Philadelphia offers a unique setting for an
    eclectic mix of modern lifestyles, mingling both the edgy and the sophisticated. History and art are pervasive in the city
    proper. Walking through downtown,
    you’ll likely spot murals and mosaics coating the sides of industrial warehouses and ivy
    climbing the walls of 300-year-old brick buildings. Culture is well-established in Philly, too,
    as evidenced by the array of art galleries, music venues and theaters, as well as the
    nation’s oldest art museum. Families tend to leave the center city area
    in favor of the quality schools and larger home options of areas like Manayunk, East
    Falls and Roxborough. Small public parks are interspersed in the
    gridwork of Philadelphia, an important aspect of William Penn’s design for Philadelphia. These green spaces bring welcome relief from
    the daily hustle and bustle and are an integral part of the City of Brotherly Love. 3. Penn Wynne. Penn Wynne is a suburb in Montgomery County
    with roughly 6,000 residents and often shows up on many livability polls. That is because everything seems to be going
    swimmingly in Penn Wynne. It has an excellent school system ranked A+
    by Niche.com, a website that crunches public data to provide ratings and rankings for schools
    and neighbourhoods. Indeed, this system is responsible for a 13%
    higher high school graduation rate that the rest of the state. Crime rate in this suburb, which mostly comprises
    residential streets, is virtually non-existent. The residents, with a large Orthodox Jewish
    population amongst them, is keen on promoting a green lifestyle,
    working together as a community to conserve the natural assets in the area. 4. State College. State College might not immediately come to
    mind as a great place to live, because it is most widely known as a college town. Despite the fact that Penn State students
    outnumber other residents here, it can be a wonderful place to live due to its safety
    and the fun activities that the area provides. Of course you probably know that some of the
    best ice cream in the country can be found here,
    at the Penn State Creamery. There are great schools, if you’re going to
    raise a family here — and the plethora of college students means that
    there’s always fun events and activities taking place. Low crime rate. Low commute time with most residents spending
    16 minutes on average to get to their stations. Vibrant nightlife. Plenty of outdoor activities. State College is one of the best places to
    live in Pennsylvania. 5. Mount Lebanon. If a higher than average high school graduation
    rate, higher than average income, low crime rate and
    multiple local amenities sound like a nice combination for you when choosing a place
    to live in, consider Mount Lebanon. The cost of living in this town of 33,000
    residents is slightly higher than what you would contend with in other places in Pennsylvania. Median home value is $225,000 and rent is
    a little over $100 more than national average. But with all the aforementioned positives
    promised by this Pittsburgh suburb, you can absolutely justify making a move here. 6. Radnor Township. Radnor Township is located in Delaware County
    and is home to 32,000 people. We admit this is not the most pocket-friendly
    of towns in the state, but if education is one of the influencing factors when choosing
    an ideal place to live, you can’t do better than Radnor Township. The population here is well-educated, with
    good public schools ranked A+ on Niche.com, and great universities that include the likes
    of Eastern College and Villanova University. It thus comes as no surprise to know the median
    income of $106,538 is double that the national average and one of the highest in the state. That is more than enough to cushion the residents
    from the high cost of living in a place where homes average $622,500. 7. Bethel Park. This Pittsburgh suburb of 32,000 residents
    gives you plenty of reasons to call it home. The education system is one of the best in
    Pennsylvania, and there is little crime happening here. The cost of living is some way below the national
    average, and the area is steeped in so much natural
    beauty, it is hard to believe an average three-bedroom home goes for $160,000. You won’t venture a mile in Bethel Park
    without coming across green space that is not meticulously maintained. This means there is plenty of space for your
    children to play and run around, and all these together make for compelling reasons to raise
    a family here. 8. West Chester. Speaking of Chester County, if you prefer
    living in the vicinity of Philadelphia, one of the best places to live is West Chester. The suburb of 19,000 people is a feast for
    the history lover looking to immerse themselves in the deep past of Pennsylvania. It is littered with historic homes and buildings
    so precious they are protected, and setting foot here is akin to stepping into a time
    capsule. Understandably, the cost of living is high,
    with median home value sitting at $313,000. The education system, however, can hold its
    own with the very best in the state, boasting the highest graduation rate in the state. 9. Emmaus. The quaint suburb of Emmaus is nestled in
    the picturesque Lehigh County near Allentown. It is a historic community with a population
    of 11,000 residents who love the area for more than just the peace and quiet. The education system is excellent and the
    cost of living is low, with homes going for $170,000 on average. Emmaus is a close community noted for its
    friendly atmosphere, and its livability didn’t escape the attention of Money Magazine which
    has featured the suburb more than once in its 100 best places
    to live in the US list. Anyone who has watched the comedy drama Marley
    & Me might be surprised to know Emmaus is the real-life home of the family that inspired
    the film. 10. Philadelphia Main Line .
    The Philadelphia Main Line, known simply as the Main Line, is an informally delineated
    historical and social region of suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It derives its name from the fact that towns
    were built along the “Main Line” of the Pennsylvania Railroad. If money is no object for you, then the Main
    Line is a great place to live. It includes the top school districts in the
    state – Tredyffrin/Easttown School District, Lower
    Merion School District, and Radnor Township School District. It’s also an extremely safe and beautiful
    area with an endless array of fun restaurants and activities. It is within close proximity to Philadelphia
    and offers easy public transportation into the city.

    A Bridge Between the USA and Russia
    Articles, Blog

    A Bridge Between the USA and Russia

    August 15, 2019


    The relationship between the USA and Russia is complicated. JFK: “It shall be the policy of this nation to regard any nuclear missile, launched from Cuba against any nation in the Western Hemisphere as an attack by the Soviet Union on the United States.” *Intense laughter* JFK: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade, and do the other things. Not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” Their rivalry defined the second half of the 20th century. Reagan: “Mr. Gorbachev tear down this wall.” Millions are spent each year trying to improve relations, and even more spent undermining them again. To many their opposites; chalk and cheese, vodka and apple pie, Oceania vs Eurasia, East vs West. It’s easy to forget that only 51 miles separates them. If we’re going to spend so much time, energy and money trying to build bridges between Russia and America, then why not just build an actual bridge? In 1986 Ronald Reagan gave engineer Tung Yun Lin a National Medal of Science, Lin handed back to him a 16-page plan for an intercontinental peace bridge. Whether for environmental, financial, or political reasons a bridge across the Bering Strait has been on someone’s agenda ever since. Most of this talk has come to nothing, but in 2015 Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping started to make some actual plans. *Theme music* The Bering Strait is a 51 mile sea passage separating Siberia and Alaska. In 1867 the US bought Alaska for 7.2 million dollars or 2 cents an acre. This created a new border right down the middle separating two small islands, Big Diomede (Russian), and Little Diomede (now American). The same boundary is followed today by the International Date Line, giving the Diomedes the adorable nicknames of “Tomorrow Island” and “Yesterday Isle”. Ever since the Cold War Big Diomede and most of Russia’s Eastern Shore has been a military zone. No travel is permitted. In fact, you can’t arrive or depart there even with a Russian visa. The closest you can get is the port of Provideniya, and even then you should probably get permission before rocking up. This hasn’t stopped people trying though, in 2006 Karl Bushby and Dimitri Kieffer navigated the strait’s ice floes on foot. However Lynne Cox swam between the Diomedes in 1987, The public support was so immense that Reagan and Gorbachev thanked her at the signing of the nuclear forces treaty. Gorbachev: “It took a daring American girl by the name of Lynne Cox a mere two hours to swim the distance separating our two countries, By her courage she showed how close to each other our two peoples live.” Trump: “We’re not gonna let them violate a nuclear agreement, and go out and do weapons. So we’re going to terminate the agreement. We’re gonna pull out.” We could really do with another Lynne Cox right now. Something to bring the US and Russia together. The whole world a little closer. Even if it has to be marketed to us as a trade deal or a “Trans-Pacific Infrastructure Investment”. A bridge would be a common project, a physical link forcing superpowers to cooperate. But ignoring all political and financial hurdles for now. Is it even possible? Currently the world’s longest sea bridge is 34 miles across, Connecting Hong Kong to Zhuhai and Macau in China. And although the Bering Strait is 51 miles, the longest bridge you’d actually have to build would only be 26. The Diomedes make two perfect stopping points. You could build a US bridge on one side and a Russian bridge on the other. In fact, make it a race the loser has to build the three-mile bridge connecting the two. Construction would be slow, for seven months of the year the temperature is well below freezing, and although the Strait rarely freezes large chunks of ice are funneled through the passage from the Arctic. These ice floes would exert enormous pressure on any structure we built. There may be engineering solution around this, but perhaps the simplest would be to scrap the bridge and dig a tunnel. Tunnels may not lend themselves to metaphors as well, but they’re warmer, often cheaper over long distances, you can lay gas, oil, and electricity alongside. They’re protected from harsh weather, and ships can still pass above them. With the Arctic ice caps melting, the Bering Strait could become a very busy shipping lane in the next 20 years. The Strait is relatively shallow, the maximum depth is only 55 metres. The Channel Tunnel is a hundred metres below sea level. That opened in 1994 connecting the UK to Europe, and that relationship is going swimmingly. A tunnel (unlike a bridge) doesn’t have to intersect the Diomedes, it can start and end at more convenient points. But therein lies the problem. There are no convenient points. Here’s a map of the Alaskan and Siberian road networks, the closest highways are 2,000 miles apart. In Russia anything east of Magadan is impossible to get to by car. And although there are plans for major Alaskan routes, anything west of Fairbanks is tricky. Tunnelling under the Bering Strait would be the easy part, you’d also have to build thousands of miles of roads, over rough terrain, in incredibly harsh conditions. And after all that you’ve still got to persuade people to drive it. The only sensible option would be a train. You’ll still face all the same obstacles during construction, but a warm high-speed railroad from Anchorage to Vladivostok is way more convenient than a 60 hour drive through the Arctic. The main use of such a railroad would be freight. If we extend the network through North America and into China, it could transport a significant amount of the world’s cargo. But now we’ve got one of the biggest engineering projects in the world, costing hundreds of billions of dollars. Is there a need for it? An Arctic railroad would have to compete with our existing freight network, boats and planes. The busiest shipping route in the world by cargo is China to North America. So let’s say we want to ship one metric ton between the two busiest ports, Shanghai to Vancouver. We’ve got four options; ship, air, rail ,and road. A boat can do it in 15 to 20 days, cost us $300, and produce 225kg of CO2. Plane: 1 day, $3,500, 4,400kg. A train: 2 to 4 days, $400, 630kg. And a truck: 7 to 10 days, $900, 1,050kg. If speed is the priority and money no object, a plane is the way to go. But if speed doesn’t matter and you want the best value for money then shipping is the clear winner. Ships and planes account for 90% of global trade, that is a lot of fuel being burned all day, every day. Diesel trains are not environmentally friendly, but both Alaska and Siberia have stores of untapped geothermal energy. We need to replace as many major transport routes as possible with renewable alternatives, and high-speed electric trains are one of them. There’d definitely be a market for an Arctic railroad, it would dramatically improve travel time without an enormous increase in price. Whether it would be profitable for whoever built it though is another matter. It would have to be a financier with very deep pockets, and probably an ulterior motive. That pretty much leaves three options; Russia, America, or China. China are building railways and shipping ports everywhere. They’re already building high-speed railways connecting Europe, Africa and Asia. All with China as the central hub. They don’t just want to be at the crossroads. They want to be the crossroads, for all future international trade and transport. That means North and South America are definitely on the agenda. In fact, they proposed a high-speed railway connecting china to the US in 2007. Putin has given China approval to build through Siberia. And then in 2015 China and Russia announced they were collaborating, to build the Siberia and Alaska passage together. This is mostly just talk, but it’s getting louder and more frequent. There’s a reasonable chance of it happening with or without US involvement. It would be a real shame if multiple countries didn’t cooperate on this project. Not to mention the dangerous power dynamic it could create. An Arctic railroad connecting China, Russia, and the US would be an amazing achievement. An opportunity for three superpowers, currently jostling for their place in the century, to collaborate on a common project. One that could genuinely improve the world, environmentally, financially, and politically.

    Ultra High Speed Cameras – How do you film a tank shell in flight or a Nuclear bomb test?
    Articles, Blog

    Ultra High Speed Cameras – How do you film a tank shell in flight or a Nuclear bomb test?

    August 15, 2019


    In my last video I looked railguns, now
    whilst I was reviewing the footage I started wondering how they filmed the
    projectiles in flight. These are not the typical sort of high-speed camera shots
    where you see a bullet hitting a target for example, these are tracking the
    projectile from the barrel down the firing range. From the footage it looks
    like the camera is panning around and following the projectile but that would
    be impossible, the tank round is traveling at over 1,500 meters per
    second and would normally look like this. For all of you out there who said it’s
    done with mirrors then you are absolutely correct.
    It works by having a computer-controlled high-speed rotating mirror in line of
    sight of a high-speed camera. The speed of the rotation of a mirror matches that
    of the object being followed so the faster the object is traveling like a
    railgun projectile the faster the mirror would turn to keep up with it. Using this
    method the object can be kept in the field of view for a hundred meters or so
    or about ninety degrees of the mirrors movement. In this example the tracker 2
    from specialized imaging you can see the mirror and to its left where the camera
    is. Because the mirror is computer-controlled it can be programmed
    to follow objects that accelerate even linearly or non linearly. Now rotating
    mirrors aren’t new in fact they were some of the first high-speed cameras and
    are still some of the fastest in the world capable of up to 25 million frames
    per second and were used to record atom bomb blasts. During the Manhattan Project to develop the first atomic bomb they required cameras that could record the
    first few microseconds of explosion. In order to create a nuclear chain reaction
    and achieve critical mass a baseball-sized piece of plutonium had to
    be compressed to about half its size. This was achieved by using an array of
    focused high explosive lenses surrounding the plutonium core. In order
    to make it work effectively the explosives 32 of them in all had to be
    triggered within one microsecond, if any were delayed then the compression
    of the core would be unequal and the reaction would even be much less or may
    not even happen at all. Using a super high-speed camera it will
    be possible to see how effective the explosive lenses had been just a few
    microseconds after detonation. At the time the fastest cameras were Fastax
    cine cameras and could achieve around 10,000 frames per second or one frame
    per hundred microseconds, this still wasn’t fast enough though. The first
    high-speed rotating mirror camera was the Marley, invented by of a British
    physicist William Gregory Marley, the Marley camera used a rotating mirror an
    array of lenses inside a curved housing each focused onto a single piece of film
    around the edge of the case. This could record a sequence of up to 50 images
    onto 35 millimeter film at a 100,000 frames per second. But by the
    time of a Trinity test it was outdated and too slow to record the ultra quick
    reaction in the plutonium core. Head of the photography unit Julian Mack said that
    the fixed short focus and low quality of the lenses would probably have made the
    Marley camera pictures useless. He helped develop the Mack Streak camera
    which had a 10 million frames per second limit, thats one frame every hundred
    nanoseconds. By the 1950s Harold Edgerton had developed the Rapatronic camera
    the name coming from Rapid Action Electronic this used a magneto-optic
    shutter which allowed it to have an exposure time as short as 10 nanoseconds
    thats ten billionths of a second. This was first used with a hydrogen bomb test of
    Eniwetok Atoll in 1952. However they only took one image so to
    see the first few microseconds of a nuclear detonation up to 10 were used
    in sequence with an average exposure time of three microseconds. The images
    were then played back and blended together to give the impression of a
    film. For the British nuclear tests the Atomic Weapons Research
    Establishment created for C4, a huge rotating mirror camera weighing in at
    around 2,000 kilograms and was the fastest in
    the world at the time. This could record up to 7 million frames per second who
    have a mirror rotating up to 300,000 revolutions per minute and recorded the
    first British atom bomb test on the 3rd of October 1952. The rotating mirror
    cameras are still in use today but now they use highly sensitive CCDs
    to replace the filmstrip. The Brandaris 128 and Cordin model 510 have 128 CCD’s and a gas driven turbine mirror driven by helium to achieve up to 25
    million frames per second at a resolution of 500 x 292 pixels for the
    brand iris and 616 x 920 pixels of recording. At 25 million
    frames per second the mirror itself is running at 1.2 million
    revolutions per minute that’s 20,000 revolutions per second so fast of the
    atmosphere inside the camera is 98% helium to reduce for friction and the
    pressure waves that would occur in normal air. And so onto something I think
    you may find rather interesting. It’s not the fastest camera in the world but this
    one is or it was at the time in 2013 the fastest real-time tracker of a moving
    object and was developed by the Ishikawa Oku Lab at the University of Tokyo. Here
    it is tracking a ping pong ball and keeping it in the center of a frame all
    times both during a game and when it is being spun around on a piece of string.
    It does this by moving two mirrors in front of the camera one for the X
    movement and Yvon for the Y movement it then uses software similar to face
    tracking software to provide feedback to control the mirrors with a response time
    of just one millisecond. It can also be used to control a projector and in this
    scene it’s projecting an image onto the ping-pong ball whilst it’s been bounced
    on the bat, you can see the little face change on the ball at the top of its
    travel. So anyways I hope you enjoyed this look at some of the equipment behind some of the most amazing footage recorded to date
    these aren’t the fastest cameras in the world now but it’s still amazing to
    think what can be achieved by mechanical means. So as always thanks for watching
    and don’t forget we also have the curious droid Facebook page and I would
    also like to thank all of our patrons for their ongoing support and if you
    would like to support us then you can find out more on the link now showing so
    thanks again for watching and please subscribe, rate and share.

    See how Thai police treats an Indian Tourist!
    Articles, Blog

    See how Thai police treats an Indian Tourist!

    August 15, 2019


    Its 7:30 pm and I have reached Tak Now I have to get down from this truck. Tomorrow I will hitchhike another 125 kilometers to reach Chiang Mai This is Tak Highway Police Station I just met this gentleman in this police station I told him how I reached here from Ayutthaya and tomorrow I have to go Chiang Mai Lets see how can he help me Wow! People are so good here Even Thai police is very helpful He is showing me the bathroom He is so helpful! I came to the police station to ask for their help. I asked him for a budget hotel or hostel to stay but he said that I can stay at the Police station itself GOOGLE TRANSLATE APP I never had such a wonderful experience with Police I am going to stay here tonight He has shown me all the important places like the shower, toilet, washbasin, etc.. and now i have got the couch in a police station… so no safety issues What else a traveller needs! He has also given me these bottles of water NAAM=Water (in Thai) 1 Banana for 8 Baht, i.e. 16 Indian rupees I found here something which I was searching since long Almonds, Cashewnuts, Pistachio, Peanuts, Dried green peas… Being a vegetarian these things are always advisable while travelling Milk Salted Peanuts Dried Green Peas Coconut cookies Almonds Total comes to 122 Baht and 50 ‘Satang’ Yes, Its called Satang… I have become an expert in Thai πŸ˜‰ Now I am having my dinner… Feeling sleepy.. Good Night I am experiencing their wonderful hospitality since early morning They opened their private bathroom for me when I asked for a place to take bath After getting ready they said me that they have arranged a special breakfast for me I made a coffee for myself using their coffee making machine They got a Chicken dish, Pork and Omelette specially made for me Though I do eat these things, being a vegetarian But I am overwhelmed by their gesture He is the senior most officer ‘Boss’ at this Police station This breakfast has come from his home I never imagined such a wonderful hospitality by a Police in a foreign country We all are having breakfast togeather We are discussing on several topics on this table They know many things about India Its 9 am and time to go His wife prepared the breakfast for me A special thanks to the lady They are also going to give me lift in their Police car and probably they will arrange another vehicle to go further upto Chiang Mai I am overwhelmed! Getting hospitality from Police I am so happy for everything they are doing for me I will travel in a patrol car of Thai Highway Police Its 9 am and today is 23rd January 2017 Its third day of my journey in Thailand So lets hit the road again πŸ™‚

    Why Abandoned Railroads Still Matter πŸ›€
    Articles, Blog

    Why Abandoned Railroads Still Matter πŸ›€

    August 14, 2019


    Hey everybody thanks for tuning in! Today I want to zoom out a little bit so to speak and talk about the much larger and broader idea that led me to propose a hydrogen-powered streetcar in Long Beach. Ever since I was a toddler, every time my family would drive by some abandoned railroad tracks, I would crane my neck and try and get a good look. Where did the train used to go? Why did it fall into disuse? Would it benefit the public if it was brought back to life? Once I was old enough to go exploring on my own, I would follow overgrown railroad tracks for hours trying to imagine where they used to go and how long ago they stopped being used. This fascination, this obsession with lost railroads has stuck with me to this day, but new reasons for it have developed as I’ve learned more about the history of passenger rail in the United States and as of late becoming increasingly excited about the possibilities that exist for such rail in the future cities like Long Beach. Long Beach like most other Southern Californian cities, was built around passenger rail lines financed and built by real estate tycoons such as Henry Huntington. But… Voiceover: For the tremendous development and progress of this amazing area coupled with its usually pleasant climate is but a never-ending stream of population pouring into Los Angeles and the surrounding communities, mass production of modern houses with liberal financing arrangements enabled many thousands of young Americans to own their own homes for the first time! Near the lake there now arose a city, built by subdividers who had planned it, planned it as no other American city had been planned since L’Enfant laid out the District of Columbia 170 years ago. Me: We lost those very arteries connecting different neighborhoods with one other in the years of the postwar building boom, the time when middle-class GIs returning home from the war purchased cars and homes in the suburbs of our cities, creating urban sprawl while an excessive reliance on the private automobile began to characterize urban and suburban life throughout the country. Voiceover: Congress responded with the federal aid Highway Act of 1956 providing the staggering sum of $51,000,000,000 to be spent by the states on highway construction by 1971. The most talked-about phase of the act is the interstate highway system, a 41,000 mile network of our most important roads. Most of these roads will be four, six even eight-lane expressways constructed for through traffic. They will take the over-the-road driver from city to city, coast-to-coast at highways speeds, even through large population centers. Me: Both politicians and the public came to yield the automobile as a silver bullet for the transportation needs of Americans, leading to alternative forms of transit being underfunded and largely neglected in infrastructure spending all throughout the 1960s, 70s and through to the present-day. Even now federal transit funding for government owned passenger railroad Amtrak is outweighed by federal highway spending more than 50 to 1. Part of this is a consequence of the freeway system’s massive expansion in the postwar years to a road network of over 4 million miles, all of which must now be constantly repaired and maintained. While roads are generally less expensive to build than railroads, they cost far more to maintain per mile than railroad tracks, and with the exception of a small fraction of highways that require a toll be paid in order to use the road, generate no revenue. Railroads on the other hand, while often at least partially subsidized with tax dollars, those subsidies are actually generally offset by ticket sale revenue, ultimately saving the taxpayer money over highways. Build trains spend more now, pay less later. Build roads and save money now, pay MORE money later, it’s that simple. With the decline of the private railroad industry in the 1970’s cumulating with the bankruptcy of the Penn Central Railroad and numerous other privately owned railroad throughout the country, many lines that had been required to provide passenger service by law were abandoned when their respective railroads went bankrupt due to a combination of poor management, excessive tax burdes and the rise of the automobile. And these abandoned, mostly disused or otherwise maligned relics of pre WWII America are everywhere. Depending on how long ago a line was abandoned, and the subsequent decisions made once under public ownership, abandoned lines like this can be more or less visible. The tracks may be present, rusting away in neglect, or they may have been removed entirely leaving only an intact strip of undeveloped or partially developed land. Many of the landscaped medians often found in the roads of Long Beach and throughout Southern California, little useless parks that look nice but nobody walks their dog in due to their strange sizes and locations, were actually once rail lines. This is true for the medians of 2nd Street in both Belmont Shore and Naples Island. Some were simply paved over in their entirety and turned into roads for cars, such as the lower eastbound lanes of Livingston Avenue. Whether or not the tracks remain following abandonment generally depends on how wealthy an area is. Poorer areas tend to retain the rails themselves, while richer neighborhoods often remove them and landscape the old routes, but they remain at least for now so quite clear to see with the benefit of some historical knowledge and a bird’s-eye view. So, you might be wondering what that bigger picture is that I brought up in the beginning of this video, while others might have already guessed what I’m getting at here. Those old lines? We should use them for transit! Right? Despite the total loss of the actual railroad infrastructure in some cases, these strips of disused right-of-way which litter the American cityscape are usually at least partly publicly-owned, and therefore would be a bargain to bring back to life saving the taxpayers hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars over the cost of building a line between the exact same two points only a few hundred feet away from the existing line. There is no more prohibitive cost in developing a new transit line than real estate. And we can actually do something with this knowledge and develop these as light rail transit lines NOW, before the rights-of-way are sold off and subdivided saving ourselves billions over the costs of developing similar lines a few decades down the road. Does anybody really think people are going to stop moving to sunny, nearly winterless Southern California anytime soon? I didn’t think so. I know I’m not going anywhere. So we have to be ready to welcome our new neighbors from the cold northern states of the U.S. and throughout the world, and we’re not gonna be able to do that without developing an expansive world-class light rail transit network, otherwise nobody not even those of us who want to will be able to practically own and drive a vehicle around here once the population density reaches its inevitable breaking point. So, building a reliable fast and comfortable light rail alternative to total automobile dependence is going to be an inevitability as population density soars throughout Los Angeles, Long Beach, Orange County and all throughout Southern California, but it is only going to be cheap if we do it now, before things get out of hand. We can avoid the problems now being confronted in densely settled areas like West Hollywood, where residents are only now finally going to get a subway extension paid for with several billion dollars in funding from Measure M. Unlike West Hollywood, though, we here in Long Beach and the surrounding communities actually still have a few intact light rail corridors that have not yet been divided piecemeal for housing. If we were to turn only a few of these into regional light rail lines, our transit map could quite swiftly go from looking like this, to looking like this, then this, then perhaps this and beyond. A lot more if you might consider using mass transit than do now if it could get you right to your destination is a similar amount of time as driving, would you not? What if could get you there in less time? Some of you might now be thinking “what’s wrong with our bus system?” and the answer to that question? Nothing! There’s nothing wrong with the public buses operated by Metro, Long Beach Transit, Torrance Transit, OCTA and other municipal agencies in the area. In fact, they’re great! Our local bus systems are clean, safe, super affordable and on-time more often than not, although not quite as often as Metro rail, but they cannot be the entire picture of mass transit in Southern California or even in Long Beach simply because they take so, so much longer than driving. Time is money, man. Buses work best for short hops to destinations that are a bit further than you would want to walk or bike from a train station, but the further you travel on a bus the more one will find that the overall speed of the journey becomes hampered by the compounding factors of frequent stopping picking up and waiting for passengers to pay the fare, and the fundamental vulnerability of buses to be delayed by the same traffic congestion as suffered by private motorists, only exacerbated by the enormous size and lack of maneuverability of a bus. As a result, and you can check this on your phone yourself if you think I’m exaggerating, interurban bus journeys during peak hours often take more than three times as long as driving between the same two locations in a car. But the best approach to these fundamental shortcomings of bus transit is to use buses properly within a larger framework public transportation infrastructure. Buses on shared city streets simply don’t work well for interurban journeys and buses work better when they’re used only for that last stretch of travel from the train station to your destination. Public transit works the best when these networks are developed with a strong efficient and fast arterial foundation of a solid rail network is complemented with reliable bus service from the train station to anywhere the train can’t go due to either a lack of demand and density in the service area, or simply geographic obstacles that have not yet been overcome. That’s all for now! Thanks again for tuning in and please do like and subscribe to my channel for more videos like this one! Do you hate driving on the 405 as much as I do? Join me next time as we explore the possibility of developing direct rail service for a massive bargain between downtown Long Beach and Lomita, Torrance and perhaps even Los Angeles International Airport by using the existing disused rail line already bought and paid for by the county.

    How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will impact Hawaii residents
    Articles, Blog

    How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will impact Hawaii residents

    August 14, 2019


    ♪ Kelly: WELCOME BACK. TAX SEASON WILL BE WRAPPING UP SOON. A FEW MONTHS AGO A NEW LAW WAS PASSED. WHAT DOES THIS? WE HAVE TOM YAMACHIKA, PRESIDENT OF TAX FOUNDATION OF HAWAI’I. SO HAPPY TO HAVE YOU. THANK YOU FOR JOINING US. GLAD TO BY HERE. Kelly: TAX CUTS AND JOBS ACT, THIS IS THE FIRST I’VE HEARD OF IT. WHAT DOES IT MEAN? WHAT IS IT? IT’S A BIG CHANGE TO THE TAX LAW THAT HAPPENED AT THE END OF LAST YEAR. IT’S ONE OF THE BIG PIECES OF LEGISLATION THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP AND THE REPUBLICANS IN CONGRESS PUT THREW. IT MADE MASSIVE CHANGES IN HOW OUR TAX ARE CHAL CRATE — CAT — CALCULATED. Kelly: I HEARD ABOUT THE BIG CHANGES THAT TRUMP WAS BRINGING BUT I DIDN’T REALIZES WHAT IT WAS CUT. HOW IS IT GOING TO BE IMPACTING INDIVIDUALS? FOR MOST INDIVIDUALS, THEY’LL HAVE FEWER WRITEOFFS BECAUSE THAT’S PART OF WHAT THE TAX — IT MADE THE CODE SIMPLER BY LIMITING THE THINGS THAT PEOPLE HAD TO KEEP RECORDS FOR. AND CLAIMING UNDER TAX RETURN. BUT IN RETURN, THEY LOWED THE PERCENTAGE RATE. SO THE TAX THAT YOU PAY IS TAXABLE INCOME. AND THE PERCENTAGE WENT DOWN. THOSE TWO CHANGES, MOST PEOPLE ARE GOING TO BE A LITTLE BETTER OFF. ONE OF THE TAX FOUNDATION, THE NATIONAL ONE, THEY CALCULATED THAT AN AVERAGE MIDDLE CLASS PERSON IN HAWAI’I WILL GET EIGHT HUNDRED DOLLARS MORE BACK. Kelly:S. Kelly: THAT’S A POSITIVE THING. OKAY. SO WHAT ABOUT FOR NORMAL WORKING PEOPLE? FOR NORMAL WORKING PEOPLE, THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT THE STANDARD DEDUCTION IS DOUBLE. WHICH MEANS THAT YOU CAN WRITE OFF 12,000 INSTEAD OF 16,000 WITHOUT HAVING TO KEEP RECORDS AND RECEIPTS IN SHOE BOXES. Kelly: AND IS THAT GENERALLY THE ONE THAT MOST PEOPLE DO? THE STANDARD DEDUCTION? MOST WORKING PEOPLE COULD TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THAT. Kelly: THERE ARE DEFINITELY SOME BENEFITS, DEPENDING ON HOW YOU FEEL. WHAT ABOUT BUSINESS OWNERS? IS IT GOING TO BENEFIT THEM? A LOT OF BENEFITS ARE FOR BUSINESSES. CORPORATION TAX RATE, FOR EXAMPLE, WENT FROM 35% TO 21%, WHICH IS A BIG DROP. THERE IS A SIMILAR BENEFIT FOR PEOPLE WHO OWN BUSINESSES BUT ARE NOT IN A CORPORATION. SO THE WAY THAT WORKS IS PEOPLE WHO PAY INDIVIDUAL TAX RETURNS, THE TAX FOR BUSINESS OR PART OF THE TAXING BUSINESS, THEY GET A DEDUCTION. THE DEFAULT AMOUNT IS 20% OF THAT BUSINESS INCOME. Kelly: GOOD TO KNOW. IS THE STATE OF HAWAI’I, IS OUR INCOME TAX GOING TO CONFORM TO THE FEDERAL CHANGES? THERE ARE FEDERAL CHANGES. THERE ARE LOTS OF FEDERAL CHANGES. AND THAT’S WHAT THE LEGISLATURE IS CONSIDERING NOW.. THE LEGISLATURE IS IN SESSION. THIS TAX REFORM BILL IS ONE OF THE BILLS TO CONSIDER. THE LATEST DRAFT SAYS IT WILL PICK UP MOST OF THE CHANGES FOR BUSINESS. EXCEPT FOR THE RATE. THEY’RE GOING TO LEAVE THE RATE THE SAME. THEY ARE NOT GOING TO PICK UP A LOT OF CHANGES FOR INDIVIDUALS. FOR EXAMPLE, IF YOU WANT TO WRITE OFF MORE THAN $10,000 IN STATE TAXES OR WRITE OFF YOUR MORTGAGE INTEREST WHAT WE CALL THE 20% ITEMIZED DEDUCTIONS, YOU CAN DO THAT BUT ONLY ON YOUR STATE RETURN. WE CAN’T AFFECT WHAT CONGRESS DOES. Kelly: THAT MAKES SENSE. GOOD TO KNOW. IT WILL BE IMPACTING FOR SURE YOUR FEDERAL RETURNS BUT STATE ONLY PARTIALLY. AWESOME. AND FOR MORE, IF PEOPLE WANT TO GET MORE INFORMATION? WE HAVE OUR WEBSITE WITH ALL KINDS OF INFORMATION. TH HAWAI’I.ORG.

    Canadian Pacific crews lift railroad tracks above floodwaters
    Articles, Blog

    Canadian Pacific crews lift railroad tracks above floodwaters

    August 14, 2019


    MORE SERVICES THAN IN THE PAST. VETERANS WILL NO LONGER HAVE TO TRAVEL TO IOWA CITY FOR SERVICES LIKE AUDIOLOGY, OPTHALMOLOGY, PHYSICAL THERAPY, CHIROPRACTIC, PODIATRY AND HOME-BASED PRIMARY CARE. STOPPING CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS. LOCAL FOUR’S GRACE RUNKEL REPORTS THE TRAINS WILL KEEP RUNNING EVEN WHEN THE RIVER IS 20 FEET DEEP. 3 “(GRACE): The flood waters are rising, but luckily for trains coming through Davenport the railroad tracks are too. Canadian Pacific crews are raising the tracks once again, this time higher than ever before.NAT: train IN ORDER TO FIRST DROP GRAVEL ON THE TRACKS. NAT: dropping gravel THEN A PLOW COMES THROUGH TO CREATE A SMOOTH SURFACE. NAT: plow through water LAST, AN EXCAVATOR COMES IN TO LIFT UP THE TIES AND SET THE TRACKS ON TOP OF THE ROCKS. A SPOKESPERSON FOR THE CREW SAYS THEY STILL HAVE SEVERAL DAYS AHEAD OF THEM … AND THEY’VE ALREADY USED ABOUT 16 HUNDRED TONS OF GRAVEL. BY THE TIME WORK IS DONE … THE TRACK FROM THE SKY BRIDGE DOWN TO MARQUETTE STREET WILL BE SEVERAL INCHES HIGHER.AND THAT MEANS THE TRAINS CAN GET WHERE THEY NEED TO RIGHT ON TIME. even after the flood waters go down. In Davenport Grace Runkel Local 4 News.” 3

    Landscaping Parkersburg WV – Local Landscapers
    Articles, Blog

    Landscaping Parkersburg WV – Local Landscapers

    August 13, 2019


    Landscaping Parkersburg WV. I’ll your spent countless hours
    perfecting the interior of your home so why settle for last with an
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    Possible railroad crossing closure worries San Marco residents
    Articles, Blog

    Possible railroad crossing closure worries San Marco residents

    August 13, 2019


    well some people living and working in San Marco or upset about the possibility of closing railroad crossing according to a letter issued by the Florida Department of Transportation the agency received applications from the city to close the railroad crossings at Geary Street and now though Avenue news for Jax reporter Corley peels during his live show some concerns that people have with this proposal only people who live and work in this area were notified by F Quixote last week about the potential closing here nalddo Avenue a town hall meeting was also held last month and I’m told roughly 450 people will be impacted by the closing and some feel it could put public safety at risk traffic and flooding near nalddo Avenue is something Tiffany Ashe says she faces on a regular basis when she goes to work San Marco historically floods and during the flood there’s no way to get emergency vehicles to naldo Street Ashe fears the conditions in the area could get worse after receiving this letter from the FDOT stating the City of Jacksonville is asking to close railroad crossings at Geary Street and Aldo Avenue ash was told by FDOT closing the railroad crossing would save money if this railroad crossing closes here on Naldo avenue officials say it will become a dead end meaning drivers won’t have access from Naldo to Hendrix the closing would prevent drivers from escaping flooding according to Ashe I was here for the last couple of hurricanes and there were literally vehicles stalled on Cedar the only way for people to get out of the community was through Naldo and was through this exit here by the train track Sean faff Minh owns a music scroll Nardo Avenue and also feels closing the railroad crossing would cause problems for his school with now to being shut off it limits the access for our students and coming in and out it’s already this road is very congested as it is with parking Ashe is worried the closing with limit access for emergency responders and I would hate to see a situation where kids are flooded in parents can’t get to their children that would just be an absolute crisis ash hopes the community will reach out to FDOT about the negative impact she believes the railroad crossing could have in the area I reached out to FDR T and the City of Jacksonville today for comment I have not heard back FDOT is asking community members to submit their opinions about the project by February 4th reporting live from San Marco queerly PL channel for the local station

    Confederate Railroad Controversy
    Articles, Blog

    Confederate Railroad Controversy

    August 13, 2019


    ((PAUL)) WE HAVE NEW INFORMATION TONIGHT — NEWLY RELEASED DOCUMENTS SHOW THE BAND CONFEDERATE RAILROAD WAS BOOKED FOR THE DUQUOIN STATE FAIR FOR 2 MONTHS BEFORE THE GOVERNOR’S STAFF LEARNED OF THE GIG AND CANCELED IT. THE BAND WAS SCHEDULED TO PERFORM AT THE FESTIVAL IN SOUTHERN ILLINOIS AT THE END OF THIS MONTH. A DAY AFTER THE FAIR’S LINEUP WAS ANNOUNCED IN JUNE … PRITZKER CANCELED IT. THAT’S THE SAME DAY A POPULAR POLITICAL BLOGGER ASKED THE GOVERNOR’S OFFICE IN A TEXT WHETHER IT WAS APPROPRIATE TO WELCOME THE BAND GIVEN ITS NAME. A SPOKESPERSON FOR THE GOVERNOR SAID HIS “GUIDING PRINCIPLE” IS TO NOT SPEND TAX DOLLARS SUPPORTING EMBLEMS REPRESENTING RACISM OR HATE. THE BAND’S FRONTMAN SAID THE NAME WAS NEVER INTENDED AS A POLITICAL OR RACIAL STATEMENT. ((PAUL)) A PLACE IN RANTOUL MADE THE TOP 5 ON A NATIONAL BUCKET LIST. WHY ONE MAGAINZE