Browsing Tag: education

    Articles

    The Fruit Train – Learning for Kids

    September 24, 2019


    (toot toot train sounds) (toot toot train sounds) (toot toot train sounds) Here comes the fruit train! (toot toot train sounds) (toot toot train sounds) Apple Orange Banana Strawberry Grapes Pear Pineapple Lemon Watermelon Raspberries Blueberries Bye yummy fruit train!

    Articles

    Amtrak Western Long Distance Trains: Train Talk Ep. 7

    September 24, 2019


    Hello everyone and welcome to Train Talk! Today, we’re going to discuss Amtrak Long
    Distance Routes in the western United States. You probably know that Amtrak is America’s
    national passenger train network, and they serve cities and towns all across the continental
    U.S. For the most part, Amtrak service can be broken
    down into corridor trains and long distance trains. We’ll focus on the long distance trains
    this time but for the purposes of this episode, corridor trains in general travel distances
    of about 500 miles or less and there are often multiple trips made each day, while long distance
    trains travel over 500 miles and make at most one trip a day in each direction. Long distance trains got their start, like
    most amtrak services, from railroads that had previously operated the trains before
    Amtrak took over passenger rail service in the United States on May 1st, 1971, and we
    will see that reflected in the names and routes of these present day Amtrak trains. All Amtrak long distance trains in the western
    half of the country run with double deck passenger cars, called Superliners. Most trains are pulled by 2 diesel electric
    P42DC “Genesis” type locomotives, built by General Electric. Following the locomotives is a set of passenger
    cars, also called a consist. A typical long distance passenger consist
    includes a baggage car, a transition sleeper car used mostly for crew accommodations, standard
    Superliner sleeper cars, a dining car with full restaurant and kitchen, a sightseer lounge
    car with large windows and lounge chairs for sitting back and watching the scenery fly
    by, and some standard coach cars. We will now take a brief look at the 5 long
    distance Amtrak routes that run in the western half of the country. The Sunset Limited, train number 1 westbound
    and 2 eastbound, is the first long distance passenger train we’ll take a look at today
    and it is the southernmost of the long distance Amtrak routes in the west. This train runs from Los Angeles, California
    to New Orleans, Louisiana, skirting along the southern border of America as it passes
    through the states of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. It takes its name from a train run over the
    same line by the Southern Pacific Railroad. Scenic highlights include the spectacular
    Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts, The Rio Grande River, and the Bayous of Louisiana. A few cars from this train split off in San
    Antonio, Texas, running as the Texas Eagle from San Antonio to Chicago, Illinois. The Sunset Limited runs three days a week
    in each direction while the Texas Eagle runs daily. From Los Angeles to New Orleans, the train
    travels 1,995 miles over the course of two full days. Between San Antonio and Chicago, the Texas
    Eagle travels 1305 miles over the course of a day. At one time, the Sunset Limited continued
    on from New Orleans all the way to Orlando, Florida, but service was cut back to New Orleans
    in 2005. The Sunset Limited uses the standard long
    distance Amtrak consist with an extra sleeping car on the end of the that is set out along
    with the last coach car in San Antonio for the Texas Eagle. Our next train is the Southwest Chief. The Southwest Chief, operating daily as train
    3 westbound and train 4 eastbound travels between Los Angeles, California and Chicago,
    Illinois, passing through northern Arizona and New Mexico, south eastern Colorado, Kansas,
    and Missouri. This train borrows part of its name and most
    of its route from the train the Super Chief, once operated by the Santa Fe Railroad. The train passes through the northern deserts
    of Arizona and New Mexico, just skirting the Grand Canyon to the south. Leaving New Mexico, the Southwest Chief climbs
    through Glorieta and Raton passes, entering colorado and then continuing across the great
    plains of Kansas. Consists for this train are the standard for
    western long distance Amtrak routes. Trip time from Los Angeles to Chicago is just
    shy of two days, with a route length of 2,265 miles. Traveling between the San Francisco Bay Area
    of California and Chicago, Illinois, the California Zephyr snakes through some of the most beautiful
    scenery of the west. Running daily as train 5 westbound and 6 eastbound,
    the train takes its name and most of its route from the famed California Zephyr train that
    was jointly operated by the Western Pacific, Rio Grande, and Chicago Burlington and Quincy
    Railroads. From Chicago, the train passes through southern
    Iowa and Nebraska before turning into Colorado and climbing through the Rocky Mountains. The California Zephyr then passes along the
    southern shore of the Great Salt Lake, across the northern deserts of Nevada, and up and
    over the Sierra Nevada Mountains on Donner Pass, finally descending into Sacramento and
    skirting the shores of San Pablo Bay. Like the Southwest Chief, this train uses
    a standard superliner consist. The route length is 2,438 miles and the trip
    time is just over 2 days. Next is the Empire Builder. The Empire Builder runs daily as train 7 westbound
    and train 8 eastbound and travels between Chicago, Illinois and Seattle, Washington. This is the northernmost Amtrak long distance
    route in the west and it takes its name and route from the Great Northern Railway. From Chicago, the Empire Builder zips through
    Wisconsin, crosses the Mississippi River and passes through Minnesota’s twin cities region. Leaving Minnesota, the train crosses the plains
    of North Dakota and into Montana, skimming along the Missouri River and cresting the
    northern Rocky Mountains as it passes through Glacier National Park. Continuing toward the Pacific Northwest, the
    train passes through a small stretch of northern Idaho and into eastern Washington. The train makes an extended stop in Spokane,
    Washington, where a small section of the train continues on to Portland, Oregon along the
    Columbia River, operating as train numbers 27 westbound and 28 eastbound. The rest of the train continues on to Seattle. Typically, two locomotives pull the train,
    but certain times of year, a third one is added. Following the locomotives is a baggage car,
    transition sleeping car, two standard sleeping cars, a dining car, two coach cars, a sightseer
    lounge car, two more coaches, another sleeper, and finally, an additional coach car. The last coach car is dropped off in St. Paul,
    Minnesota heading westbound and picked up heading eastbound. The Sightseer Lounge, two coaches and sleeper
    at the end of the train are detached in Spokane, Washington and continue to Portland, Oregon
    as the Portland section of the train with everything ahead of the lounge car continuing
    on to Seattle. The trip time from Chicago to Seattle is just
    shy of two full days and the route length is 2,205 miles. Finally, we come to my favorite Amtrak route,
    the Coast Starlight. This train runs daily, north as train 14 and
    south as train 11 between the major cities of Los Angeles, California and Seattle, Washington. Along its 1,377 mile long route, the Coast
    Starlight skirts along the coastline of the Pacific Ocean, climbs the coastal mountains,
    passes through the San Francisco Bay Area, flies along the base of Mount Shasta and through
    the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, into the lush Willamette Valley, and finally along
    Puget Sound before arriving in Seattle. The trip takes about a day and a half. The Coast Starlight runs along the rails of
    what was once the Southern Pacific Railroad, taking its name from two different Southern
    Pacific trains: The Coast Daylight and the Starlight. This train uses a standard Superliner consist
    with the addition of a Business Class coach between the dining car and the sightseer lounge,
    and a special car called the Pacific Parlor Car, which serves as an additional lounge
    for sleeping car and business class passengers. We have come to the end of our journey for
    this episode. I hope you enjoyed the ride. To find out more about any of these trains,
    visit the Amtrak website www.amtrak.com. Also, be sure to tell me which western long distance
    Amtrak route is your favorite. If this video gets 500 likes, I will make
    a full video on the winning route. Well, that does it for now. Until next time, I’m Mike Armstrong. I’ll see you down the line! Thanks for watching!

    Articles

    2016 Forrest Research Foundation Scholars Announced

    September 14, 2019


    The Forrest foundation will allow me to
    continue my postgraduate studies will continue my PhD project at the moment it
    really means everything to me because that means I can continue my passion for
    research into oxidative stress which is implicated in many diseases like cancer
    Duchenne muscular dystrophy Alzheimer i don’t know where I would be without a
    scholarship so when I got the news it was almost cried with happiness and it
    still feels surreal at the moment I went with what I loved and now I don’t regret
    it at all this is done to a great choice and thank you for the Forrest Foundation
    scholarships really appreciate it. I think all the scholars have been such great ambassadors for Western Australia for our country and of course for the
    scholarships but I do see this is a journey without end humanity will continue to nurture such
    wonderful minds and people as Marissa and our job the job of every University
    of Western Australia is to attract those great minds firstly to stay here like
    you to not leave our fair shores and secondly to attract the greatest minds
    from around the world here to Western Australia so we can really grow the
    state in our beautiful country.

    Mesa Light Rail Extension & School Funding Lawsuit & Acts of Simple Kindness
    Articles, Blog

    Mesa Light Rail Extension & School Funding Lawsuit & Acts of Simple Kindness

    September 13, 2019


    >>>Coming up next on “Arizona Horizon,” Federal officials give the ok for another lightrail extension in Mesa. We’ll look at the differences in funding between charter schools and traditional public schools, and learn about a charity that focuses on kids who have lost loved ones. Those stories next on “Arizona Horizon.” “Arizona Horizon” is made possible by contributions from the friends of eight, members of your Arizona PBS station. Thank you.>>Good evening and welcome to “Arizona Horizon.” I’m Ted Simons. Federal officials gave the ok last week to another lightrail extension in Mesa. This one will take the tracks out to Gilbert road. Here to tell us more is Jodi Sorrell, Mesa’s transit services director. Good to have you had a err and thanks for joining us.>>Good to be here.>>This, again, goes from past pioneer park out to Gilbert, how far are we talking?>>1.9 miles.>>Ok, and this starts when?>>Right now we’re in the preliminary design phase, so we have a bit more work to do, and construction probably won’t start until, until like mid to late 2015.>>And completed when?>>By 2018.>>By 2018.>>So this should go through what is now being constructed in downtown Mesa all the way out to Gilbert. Why is this important?>>Getting to Gilbert road, stepping the lightrail to Gilbert road is very important to our council and to the city because once you get to Gilbert road you have options. Gilbert is a connective route to two freeways, so it’s a station at the end of the line is easier to, to access and, and it just provides a better gathering point for some of the lightrail riders and the buses to serve that area.>>A good park and right out there, I would imagine?>>Yes.>>A massive one.>>A good size one, yes.>>And now, the Feds had to give the ok for this. What were they looking at? What kind of environmental, historical, or cultural factor?>>Every project goes through the environmental assessment process, and they look at things from, you know, historic resources, are you hitting buildings, historic signs, and what is the noise and vibration impacts and the real estate impacts and the traffic impacts? All of those factors go into, into the document, a big, a big document submitted to the Federal Government.>>Anything come up, any concerns more than the usual?>>There was really nothing in the, in the — the way that the alignment is designed, we really minimize a lot of the impacts to the community. There is no, no historic impacts along there and, and there is, there is, except for minor right-of-way, no real buildings or signs, structure impacts along with this. So, we are excited about that.>>And as far as the costs, what are we talking about here and how will that be paid for?>>The primary estimate for the project is about 143 million. And, and we’re doing some creative — we have, we have, we are doing a unique financing. We’re not going on the typical route where we go to the fta and ask for a grant, and we are looking at, at taking Federal money that’s, that’s coming to Mesa anyway for streets, and re-purposing that street money, and making it into transit capital, so we’re kind of flexing it into transit capital, and we can use that to build the extension.>>So this money set aside for road and street projects can be set aside for this, the Feds say that’s fine?>>Right.>>And what about the match.>>The match does change because for the street element, it was about a 30% local match that had to go into it for, for the, the, this particular project, it’s a 5.7% match, so it saves Mesa some money in that realm.>>And it sounds like Mesa is thinking, city bonds, makes sense, but, I understand that the city bonds might be repaid by the Feds, as well?>>What this is, is, you know, you may have heard when people tried to advance the freeways through the valley, there is the highway project advancement notes, and two years ago, coming up on two years, the legislature passed the transportation project advancement notes which allows us to issue the notes for, for transit projects. As transit capital, so that’s what we’ll issue, and to pay for, for this, and then pay it back with, with other reimbursement money coming back to the city.>>So, but, it almost sounds as if it will pay for itself, or close?>>Not quite. Not quite.>>Close to it? For $7 million for 1.9 extension for the lightrail.>>We do have the financing costs with all of that, as well. But, yeah, it’s a good deal.>>And the 3.1 extension that goes through downtown, that one is not even finished yet, correct, an update.>>That one is not finished. We had been under construction for a couple of years. And right now, it’s, if you drive in downtown, or if you drive through Mesa, between the Sicamore station and passed the Arizona temple, you will see construction, which is a good thing, it’s a sign of progress. And in the downtown area, we have the construction moratorium in the winter months, and to give the businesses a breather and help the tourists navigate into downtown. And so, that will go until may The utility relocation is done and you will see the work in the middle of the street, where the tracks start getting late in the middle of the street.>>That’s a 3.1 extension in downtown. We are looking at the extension we talked about earlier, and that’s the one that extends from the — well, will this get started as the 3.1 is, is still being constructed.>>They should be done just about — the 3.1 should be done, that should be done really by late 2015. And, and then, the Gilbert road, the next 1.9 miles to Gilbert road won’t start until later that year.>>And you mentioned the moratorium on business as far as construction, and some would I would say there is a moratorium on construction. And talk about the impact of businesses, what do you tell the folks now with the extension, the 1.9 extension, what did you tell the folks in don’t?>>Well, the construction is construction, and it’s going to — any time that you get in, on a street, it does impact people. And metro and the city have worked to develop business assistance programs. And that, that we’re encouraging the businesses to take care of. One of the things that we did on the first 20 miles, that I think helped a lot of the businesses, at least get an idea of what to expect as we were fortunate enough to have already gone through lightrail construction. And so, we brought some of those businesses in to talk about what would they do differently? How would they prepare, and what did they learn? And which of these businesses look out for? So, some of that has helped a lot of the businesses take advantage of some of the programs.>>And I guess with this extension you will have another group of folks?>>Another group that can walk — we can bring them down the street.>>Right, and a little parade there.>>Right.>>And congratulations on this. It sounds like a lot of things are happening there, so it must be an exciting place to work.>>Yeah.>>And it’s good to have you here.>>Thank you.>>>A group of charter school students and their families are asking the Arizona court of appeals to reverse a Maricopa county superior court ruling that upholds the current funding system for K-12 schools. Those appealing the ruling say that the system gives much more money per pupil to traditional public school students at the expense of charter school students. Joining me now is the plaintiff’s attorney Kory Langhofer and also joining us is Arizona education association President Andrew Morrill. Good to see you both here and thanks for joining us. Talk to us about this suit now, what are you asking the appeals court to do?>>The education funding system is outdated. The major parts were put in place in 1980 when Arizona had one fax machine. It’s very old. And because it’s so outdated, there is significant disparities or inequalities in the system. The average student gets 8800 of funding a year. Some schools, though, have as much as 19,000 a year for their students. So there is a huge disparity, what the lawsuit is asking, is for the court of appeals to say to the legislature, it’s time you revisit the system and update this outdated system, and make it more equal, more fair.>>Is it not equal? Is it not fair, as it stands?>>It’s, as complicated as the education funding has been, one thing, the legislature has modernized it, and by cutting about 1.5 billion over the last five years, so it has been adjusted. And we would stipulate that it’s been, been insufficient, and underfunding students, whether you are talking about charters or traditional schools. We need to get the numbers right. The fact is, that it’s really not disputed among education groups, and the joint legislative budget committee will tell you in terms of the state funding per pupil, charter schools get more per pupil than schools, and that’s why you see right now, in the last session, about 60 schools converting over to charter school funding so that they can get that additional funding, so let’s make sure that we are talking about state funding, which is what this is really about.>>Does — there is a discrepancy in a discrepancy here.>>So, the, the — it’s not accurate. It is true that many public district schools are creating charters within the district system. So that they can sort of double dip. There is a gimmick in the law, you can take advantage of, to get extra money for schools. And, and the, the record in the case just doesn’t show, though, that the charter schools are overfunded. When you look at the appropriated state funds, go to, that go to charter schools, we get 1,000 to 1300 less a student every year. And that’s what the evidence in the case shows.>>And what’s going on here? We’re seeing numbers over here and numbers over there.>>Right. And what we need to do is take a look at the Federal funding, and that is offered to school districts with additional responsibilities attached to those. And we know that we have got local funding mechanisms of overrides and bonds and that really points to the difference of charter schools versus traditional public schools, yes, they are all publicly funded, but one major difference is that when communities fund, overrides and bonds, those assets that add to the district remain in the public sector. Those are public assets. And so, buildings expanded, buildings built, and they remain in the public trust as taxpayer funded and owned. You don’t see that with charter schools. So, there are a number of, a number of differences. Teacher certification requirements. The mission of charter schools when you look at the spread across our charter schools in Arizona, the student body is being served. The representation of ethnic diversity, the special needs students, and one begins to feel that there is a different mission to our charter schools. The courts evidently found so because they rejected some of the claims as to the inequitable funding.>>So, the basic point, and I don’t think it’s controversial, is students have to be treated equally. Right. It’s not fair to start charter students or public school students behind the line, right, at a disadvantaged spot compared to others. And I think that, that just from our conversation here, you could see our system is so complicated, you have got many from local taxes, state taxes, and it’s so complicated and it has been so long since it was updated. That, that we have no longer have a guarantee that our students are being treated equally regardless.>>It sounds as though the students being served, that, that particular focus, that’s not equal, as well. Charter schools do have more freedom in what they do and how they do it. As opposed to traditional public schools. And if that’s the case, should the funding still be exactly the same?>>So, it is true that charter schools have less regulation, and than public district schools, and in fact, that’s one of the reasons why, why with the same, with less funding, we’re able to achieve the same results as public district schools. And the mismatch in funding between the district schools and charter schools hasn’t been tied to those regulations. Just a number that has come about. And if it were tied, if the difference that it were tied to the regulations it would be a better argument for the state but right now, it’s just a difference without a reason.>>Is it fair that charters don’t have the safety net of taxing, of bonding and overrides?>>Well, they may not have those but they have the ability to control the funds that they are receiving, in ways that the district cannot. Case in point, we know that small schools get additional funds, from the state, and charter schools have the ability to treat each of the schools within a charter. And districts have to add up all the schools, and if they go over the total, they cannot access that funding. So, really, this is a, a disparity as you said within a disparity, but the mission, the relationship of traditional schools to the community, the separation that makes charters publicly funded, but able to hold private assets, within a private structure, really makes this more complicated than just the, the question of should the funding be the same. The courts have said, as long as we’re funding charter schools consistently, and traditional schools consistently, this he do not have to be funded the same because they have different missions.>>Is consistency more important to the plaintiffs, more so than making that number whatever it is equal, even though again, charter and traditional public, not necessarily.>>What is essential, what can’t be changed is that students have to have equal starting points. You can’t say, that, that the charter school system has the same results of the public district system, and therefore, it’s fine. We have to, to be given the same starting point and under the current system, it’s outdated, and we don’t have that.>>Starting point not the same, agreed?>>We backed off the starting points, to the point that the funding is inadequate across our schools, and look at the distribution of charter schools across the state. Some are exploring serving student needs and students in areas that they have not, traditionally. Let’s remember the charter schools came into the state on a promise of better for cheaper, we have not seen the better because they perform at about the same distribution of traditional schools, and now, the cheaper argument seems to be being wrestled with and changed somewhat, in this case, and in other situations.>>Is it ok, though, to see that better and cheaper, that formula may not be working, let’s go ahead and tinker and improve it, if it means better education.>>One of the things that we could do with charter schools, any time that we wanted was say, for the expansion of funding in the capital areas, to build buildings, that’s fine, but, those will retain and stay state property, if they are publicly funded, why not have them remain as public assets? That would be interesting. But, there are many challenges that the charter schools launch where they say, on the one hand we want public funds, but we don’t want to play by the same rules as other schools.>>Are charters willing to play by the same rules if that means the same funding?>>That’s the modernization that we need, and I think you are willing to have that conversation and we want to.>>Before I let you go, this idea of charter schools having to repay money, I know that’s in the courts, as well, and where does that stand and what’s going on here?>>So, this is a completely separate matter, but, and in 2011 and in 2012, the, the state department of education had, had a way of allocating tax dollars to schools. And they changed that method in And they wanted to apply the new method backwards. So the money you received under old plan should have been — they might want to take that back. And the new lawsuit is, basically, insisting that, that the old rules apply then and the new rules apply going forward.>>30 seconds left here.>>My understanding is that one of the problems with that particular issue is that you have charter schools that are, are not wanting to return money that, that, for years when they may not have been operating. So, I’m not, not sure that, that it’s a, as simple of a matter as it seems. The districts that ended up owing money and there were not very many, are under a plan, negotiated with the department of education to pay that back.>>And the, the districts who, that received excess money under the new rule, that has been improved, all get to keep the funding. We’re not trying to take the money away from the districts at all.>>Many districts ended up being owed money. My understanding from talking to the Department of Ed, is that they tried to negotiate as fair of a settlement for everybody as was possible.>>Ok, we’ll stop it right there. A good discussion.>>Thank you very much.>>Thanks for joining us.>>Losing a family member is difficult at any age. But for children, it could be especially hard. And in tonight’s edition of Arizona giving and leading, producer Christina Estes and photographer Steven Snow show us how one group is helping children who suffered the loss of a loved one.>>He was an amazing man, he was funny, and hard worker, and loyal, and great father and amazing husband.>>Karen Turner’s joy turned to pain in August of 2007, when her husband, Steve, died unexpectedly.>>He was 41 years old. — I was 38 and our son was 4.5.>>Telling her son was heart-breaking.>>When you talk to a child about grief, you can’t say daddy is sleeping or daddy has gone away. You have to say that daddy has died and is not coming back and is dead. You have to use those words. And it is gut-wrenching.>>Steve’s death meant the loss of Alan’s basketball Buddy, Karen’s confidante, and their security.>>Our health insurance was carried through him and his company. We lost his, our insurance overnight, I lost his income overnight.>>As bills pile up, Karen says it’s easy for parents to push aside the extras like sports, tutoring and musical lessons. But it’s the little things that can make a difference. She’s seen it with her own son.>>Right before Steve passed away, we had talked about enrolling him in T-ball. Steve had grown up playing little leagues, and he could not wait to get his son on the field. So when he died, I went ahead and enrolled him in T-ball, and first we played that and then soccer and then flag football, and that was it for him. He just — on that field, he’s like every other kid. And not one person there cares if his dad has died, they care that he’s going to. Was the ball and he’s like every other kid, and that’s important for a child.>>Seeing Allen smile made Karen smile.>>Acts of simple kindness stands for AS&K, A for Allen, for my husband, Steve, and then Karen.>>The group provides financial friends to cover extracurricular activities for children who lost parents.>>Susan Johnson used a grant to cover the gymboree membership for his son.>>We had his half birthday and a week later his father took his life. He was dealing with — he had issues with drugs and alcohol. And so, I became a widow when he was six months. And being a single mom, in my 30s, I don’t have any friends that have lost a spouse. All my friends are either single or newly married or, you know? Their happy times. I didn’t have anyone to relate to. To talk to about losing my husband.>>Until she met Karen and the other families involved in acts of kindness. They understand moving forward is important. And so is cherishing the past.>>We like to talk about him.>>I have often wondered what he would think about. I didn’t want his death to be in vain. I wanted to do something in his name, and I had no idea that an idea that literally started on the back of a napkin, would turn into what it has. I am proud of what we’re doing.>>Karen says the grants are gifts. All they ask in return is a photo of the child showing how the money was spent.>>We had one boy who was in a small town, and when his dad died in a drowning accident, he felt very isolated. There was no one else in his class that understood. So, his mom allowed him to go to the college to take the rest of his courses so that he could graduate from high school. And I think one of the best pictures we got was when he sent us a picture of him in his cap and gown because he was able to graduate.>>Acts of Simple Kindness has helped 60 children, the group relies on corporate and individual donations along with a charity bowling party. You can find out more information at actsofsimplekindness.org.>>>Foam on “Arizona Horizon,” we’ll see how Arizona 15-year-olds stack up in a study measuring the proficiency in reading, math and science literacy on the next “Arizona Horizon.” That is it for now. I’m Ted Simons and thank you very much for joining us, and you have a great evening.>>”Arizona Horizon” is made possible by contributions from the friends of eight. Members of your Arizona PBS station. Thank you.>>Virginia G. Piper charitable trust. Committed to changing lives and strengthening community. Through investments in nonprofits and strategic initiatives, more information at pipertrust.org.>>And welcome, I’m Jason Meyers, along with Deborah, and Deb, there really isn’t a program like “Arizona Horizon” anywhere.>>No, there is not. For you to be able to see the in-depth interviews like this, like the ones that Ted Simons delivers to you every time on “Arizona Horizon,” that’s not something that you are going to get on any other program.>>It’s true, what I love about “Arizona Horizon,” is, is the people that Ted has on, he’s really got his finger on the pulse of Arizona politics, and issues and, and from the Governor, to the sheriff, to all the figures here in Arizona, and some of the figures that are not as well-known.>>And during the challenging times like we face now, a show like horizon tackles the issues that were important to all of us, so, call one of the numbers on the screen right now to show your support. Because tonight we have a new way to support the station, we want to encourage you to become a sustaining monthly donor to eight. Becoming a sustaining monthly donor is simple.>>A sustaining monthly donation is one that once you set it up you determine the amount of your donation. Now, let’s just say it’s $5 a month, and it’s deducted, every month from the credit card or debit card, or your checking account.>>That’s all that there is to it. Each month, automatically that amount is deducted from the account, which allows you to sit back and enjoy all the great programs that you love here on eight. It’s an ongoing contribution that will continue until you tell us to stop, or perhaps, you will want to increase your contribution, whatever may be the case. That’s what we ask you to do.>>The programs like “Arizona Horizon,” all the children’s programming you have come to love, sustaining monthly donors are a safe and easy way to support eight, and as an extra incentive tonight when you become a sustaining monthly donor at $5 a month, we’ll send you this wonderful “Arizona Horizon” cobalt mug, as our way of saying thank you.>>And we also welcome one-time contributions, and tonight, when you make a one-time contribution of $75, we’ll send you the mug with our thanks. Whatever method you choose, please support this local opinion affairs’ program and the station that brings it to you five days a week.>>Call the number right now, and remember, the local programs you count on, really do count on you. Thank you.>>Eight delivers all Arizonans every day, free access to quality content. As the last media service in Arizona, eight delivers on our mission to educate children and provide quality programming to Arizonans of all ages and walks of life. Arizona PBS is not a business. This is a locally owned media service supported by individual contributions. 85% of the direct operating revenue comes from you, the Arizona community. The money we raise stays right here in Arizona. With this station. Eight depends on you, just as much as you depend on it. From Yuma to the Grand Canyon, Show Low Phoenix, and all places in between. This is the last media service that truly belongs to you. You live in Arizona. Isn’t it time you became a financial supporter of your local public television station? Help eight deliver more of the best in the year to come. Thank you.>>For more than 25 years, “Arizona Horizon” has been an integral part of our daily broadcast schedule. And thanks to eight and “Arizona Horizon” you and I have had coverage of all the big stories affecting Arizona.>>It’s true, just in the last few months, “Arizona Horizon” has brought you election coverage, both sides of the political debates, and state and local budget issues, and dialogue whether it comes to education and health care. Basically, “Arizona Horizon” covers it all, consumer affairs, political analysis and the environment and health and business.>>”Arizona Horizon” has consistently provided unprecedented insightful public affairs programming. We know you value this program, and that’s why you are watching. But we need more than your viewership. We need your donations.>>We do, and as you could see right now, eight relies on your support now more than ever. More than 85% of eight’s direct operating revenue comes from the Arizona community. People just like you and me. So please, go to your phone and call one of the numbers on the screen. Become an eight supporter right now.>>Great friendships, click instantly. Just go to azPBS.org/gift and begin or renew your eight membership on our secure website. You can join online. There, choose a thank you gift from a wide selection of eight programs, and special offers, or member benefits, get all the details about the gifts you are interested in, select your favorite, and make your contributions. That’s all that there is to it. Your friendship with eight, clicks instantly, and then enjoy your gift and another year of fantastic you make possible here on eight.>>We’re about ready to wrap things up and take you to another great program here on eight.>>And for those of you who called in your support for “Arizona Horizon,” a big thank you. You really do make a difference.>>If you have not called, it’s never too late. Just call or go online right now. Right now, another great program you make possible here on eight is about to begin. This is your public television station. Eight.>>You can send your contributions to the, through the mail, rush your check to friends of eight, 555 north central Avenue suite 500, Phoenix, Arizona, 85004. Your contributions to support eight is administered by eight’s membership department and deposited with the Arizona State foundation for a new American University.>>Eight would like to thank fat Fredder’s catering for their support of public television in Arizona.>>Support for eight comes from viewers like you. And from –>>The tempe festival of the arts December 6-8 in downtown Tempe, more than 400 artists from throughout North America, live music, and wine and beer tasting and festival food and street entertainment in downtown Tempe, schedules and details at Tempefestivalofthears.com.>>We are a proud member of association of community cancer centers. Patients have access to robotic surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and clinic trials.>>When you want to be more inspired, eight delivers unforgettable experiences in music, and the arts. Thanks to you. And –>>Hospice of the valley. A nonprofit hospice providing medical, social, and spiritual support to patients nearing end of life. While supporting their families. Hov.org.>>Hi, I’m Susan of the linkus group, a fee-based registered investment advisor specializing in financial planning, investment management and insurance strategies and more. Linkusgroup.com, investing for life.>>The Persian room, travel for another world to a land of exotic aromas and period decor for a fine dining experience. The Persian room, in north Scottsdale on Scottsdale road one light north of Frank Lloyd Wright boulevard, gourmet exotic cuisine at its best.

    Articles

    China’s Super Highway: MEGAPROJECTS (Part 6)

    September 13, 2019


    China is about halfway done building the largest
    expressway system in the world, and it’s done so at a feverish pace over the last 25
    years to keep up with the rise of the automobile as the country – and the world – has shifted
    away from a rail-based transportation system. The first expressway within the National Trunk
    Highway System, as it’s called, opened in 1988 and today, just 26 years later, the system
    is over 65,000 miles long. In the ten years since 2004, the network has tripled in length.
    Each year, China’s now building new expressways equivalent in length to the distance of going
    coast-to-coast and back in the United States. The Chinese system exceeded the total length
    of the US interstate highway system back in 2011. This crazy expansion has happened because
    the Chinese have embraced the car at a staggering pace. This next mind-blowing fact pretty much
    sums up this entire video: as the country’s middle class boomed and tens of millions of
    people suddenly could afford to buy cars, in the 20 years from 1985 to 2005, the number
    of passenger vehicles in China increased from 19,000 to 62 million cars on the road, that’s
    a mind-blowing increase of 323,000%. And that 62 million number is more than tripling to
    200 million by 2020. That’s why we’ve seen those stories that I thought were a joke
    the first time I read them, of traffic jams around Beijing stretching over 60 miles and
    lasting for 11 days. So this project is sorely needed simply for the country to function.
    When it’s finished, it will have cut total travel times between cities throughout the
    country, by half, on average. Overall the total cost of building the entire system is
    $240 billion dollars, that’s easily the biggest infrastructure project in human history,
    with $12 billion a year being invested through 2020. It’s been able to afford to do this
    without adding a national fuel tax because 95% of the system are toll roads owned by
    private, for-profit companies. This is a problem, as tolls are expensive at over 10 cents per
    mile…which is more than the cost of fuel itself. But regardless of how the roads are
    paid for, or whether, you drive on them in your gas or electric car, or ride in a self-driving
    car. The Chinese economy and quality of life of its people will be significantly better
    thanks to this ambitious project. It seems the whole country is embracing the Chinese
    saying, “Lutong Caiton,” wealth follows the extension of motorways.

    What if there was an EARTH METRO RAIL? (Geography Now!)
    Articles, Blog

    What if there was an EARTH METRO RAIL? (Geography Now!)

    September 6, 2019


    This episode is brought to you by the Great Courses plus Hey, geogrphy peeps, so I got another little topic for you guys to pontificate. I recently came across this image by Chris Gray from West Yorkshire, depicting his vision for a global metro system. It looks amazing, it has hundreds of different stations on 20 different lines, each reaching a different region of the planet – and it kind of got my gears spinning. First of all I Love trains. I love metro systems. They totally beat traffic. You know at first glance this picture You know it looks kind of fun yet a little far-fetched considering that a lot of the lines traverse what seems like impossible boundaries and the entire Pacific Ocean But what if. What would it take to make this a reality? Well first of all this map misses a few countries. Especially in oceania and the Caribbean and it doesn’t go to antarctica, but that’s okay. We can make that happen later. First of all there’s a few things you have to consider. If we were to literally connect every single continent on the planet it would take a lot of time energy and resources to an extent that the world has never seen before also It might be wise to make a lot of these trains hyper loops as to cut down the travel time with long distances which would also allow more people to travel. Now the first thing you would have to consider would be diplomacy and permission on which areas to build. If we were to connect North and South America, it’s unlikely that panama would open up the darién gap due to the indigenous tribes that refused to build on their land so we might have to build over the ocean into Colombia. That one section of land if it would just open up! Also keep in mind that unless if some kind of miracle Agreement was made it is most likely that people going to armenia would only be allowed to board a North-South train Line going through Georgia and Iran Due to the closed-off borders between turkey and Azerbaijan. Maybe North Korea would allow a train going in through either China or Vladivostok in Russia But I highly doubt there would be a simple Stopover between them and Seoul South Korea that means that if Chinese people want to visit South Korea they would either have to build a really long sea crossing line from the shandong peninsula to incheon or they would have to take a line through Taiwan and the yeah Yama and Okinawa Prefecture island up to Kyushu and then across to Busan and you get a lot of strange scenarios like that all over. I mean there’s that weird strange thing between Algeria and Morocco Ukraine and Russia Iraq and Uzbekistan are just a nightmare and unless you have the right Visa Belarus would probably just kick you out which brings us to the next part I really like the tactic that this guy had for transatlantic oceanic lines for North America He connected Canada to greenland to Iceland to scotland utilizing maximum land crossings at the shortest distance But with South America for some reason he decided to connect Belém brazil with Conakry guinea I don’t know exactly why he chose those cities for me a more reasonable route might be for Stella – maybe Dakar senegal or if You want minimal distance maybe in that tall – Freetown Sierra leone with a quick stopover in Ela Fernando? De Noronha off the coast to cross the pacific Of course Hawaii would have to be like the main central hub and then from there You could go to either kid or bus or the marshall Islands or hey? Why not both? It’s our imaginations We can do whatever we want. No rules up here. Yeah now if this map did go to antarctica I would suggest extending the purple America Line to Tierra Del Fuego Somehow traversing the Impossible Patagonia Glaciers and somehow without dying during the construction process reaching King George Island and from there It’s just a bunch of quick island hops until you hit gram land on the antarctic Peninsula and just be mindful building the train on Solid ground and not an unstable ice shelf and there you go now the big question what are all of the factors Elements and variables that would have to go into the mix to make this become a reality well the answer is Insanity now one thing we can consider to alleviate some of the cost is using some of the train lines We already have so that we don’t have to build a new one now I counted and it seems like with the exception of some train lines in North America Europe Russia China, India and Australia most of these lines actually don’t exist. So let’s assume We’re funding maybe about 75% of all these train lines That’s still a lot each line might cost differently based off of the terrain or ease of transport for material it would be a lot easier to transport materials over the flat plains of Russia rather than the middle of the ocean by Fiji also Are you passing through a row area or through a city because it costs more to build underneath the city then you have to consider? The Labor Force how many people are well equipped with the proper training to construct such a project how long would it take to invest? In the training of people who aren’t also you have to consider the hiring of people to mine the raw? Materials to bring to the factories to shape and mold into the train tracks and the trains themselves And how many people would it take and then you have to consider wages people in different countries get paid different wages and the oceanic Lines especially ones crossing the Pacific would probably cost the most they would probably have to be hyperloop due to the incredibly long Distances and they would have to be very strong and solid due to the fact that you know it’s the Pacific Ocean there’s cyclones There’s crazy things happening all the time They gotta be Solid oh and also consider that a transoceanic train has never been done before which by the way if you didn’t know there actually are Some hyperloop companies out there like hyperloop one or trans Pod that are in the alpha Stages of capital fundraising and researching It’s so cool. Look it up I did the math and factoring absolutely everything I could possibly think of into this whole equation I came around a number somewhere around either 65 to 94 Trillion dollars although it could be a lot more based off of so many factors that I missed out on in the end We live in a time in which air travel is the preferred method of long distance Journeys however Is that really the best way and is it the most efficient is it possible that ground? Transportation and hyperloop technology could bring us into a brand new era of unimaginable global possibility. What do you think it? What do you think about a global metro system? What destinations would you like to see being built I personally think a West Coast, California La to the Polynesian Islands train line would be the coolest thing ever and with that being said I have three very important announcements You’re going to want to listen to at least one of them the first thing that the great courses plus contacted us And they want to sponsor geography now again wahoo for those of you that don’t know the great courses plus is a website with over 7,000 online courses from all across the academic spectrum taught by highly accredited Professors and professionals many ivy league trains they have classes and so many different things like science weightlifting chess art There’s a really cool course called inventions that change the world by professor w bernard Carlsen I recommend it right now They are offering a free one-month trial Or if you really like it you can even sign up and join for a plan at really good rates All you have to do is go to this website here the great courses plus comm slash geography Or you can click on the link in my description. Thanks great courses plus you guys are always there for me You guys rock my next announcement Is that the heritage trip is? Completely funded and ready to go and happen in October with me and my mom thanks to Patreon Patrons I was able to buy the flight tickets and have a side budget for other things like trains and food you made it happen So thank you so much patreon patrons and finally my last Announcement as you know august is upon us which means the school year will soon begin for all students which means I want to visit your school earlier this year I got to visit the cool kids at Centennial High School in Corona, California And now it’s time to see more after the heritage trip in October I want to have a geography bee at your school as of right now I can only travel in North America as I’ll be using my own money to fund the travel cost for me Brandon and ken it’s A little outside of my budget to travel outside of the continent So maybe in the future of geography now gets bigger But right now I can only travel within North America and for sure I have to visit at least one place in Canada I promise you kentucky’s that I would visit before this year is over because I got to celebrate with your 150th anniversary I will be holding a contest and whichever schools win. I will visit details will come next week, so stay tuned in the meantime Thank you for watching this video. I hope you got something out of it subscribe if you want and a stay cool stay tuned

    Why the UK Runs Trains to Nowhere
    Articles, Blog

    Why the UK Runs Trains to Nowhere

    September 6, 2019


    This video was made possible by Squarespace. Build your website for 10% off at
    squarespace.com/HAI. This train should not exist, and, if were
    up to the train company, it wouldn’t, but it’s not. You see, in the UK, trains work off a franchising
    system where the UK government awards contracts to different private companies to
    operate rail services. For example Virgin Trains East
    Coast operate the east coast route, ScotRail operates most trains in Scotland, TransPennine
    express operates many trains to and from Manchester, and there are about two dozen other
    operators, but this particular train that shouldn’t exist is operated by Chiltern
    Railways. They
    mostly operate trains to smaller towns between London and Birmingham and all of their trains
    to London terminate at Marylebone station…
    except for one—this one. This particular train
    operates from the nearby London Paddington station—the terminus for Great Western and
    Heathrow Express services. But Chiltern railways has to operate services
    to London Paddington because this document says so—their franchise
    agreement. This document is basically the
    contract between the railway company and the UK government so to modify this document they
    have to ask the government and, as we all know, sometimes governments aren’t very
    efficient. So here’s your super simple guide to closing
    a railway route in Britain. Step one: perform
    a “transport appraisal.” This is basically an analysis of the effects
    that the line closure will have on passengers, the environment, and the economy. The strait-forward three stage fourteen step
    process of creating a transport appraisal is explained in this handy 35 page document
    featuring this super user-friendly flowchart. Once you’ve completed that, just give it
    to the UK Department of Transport who will analyze your
    analysis. Step two: publish your proposal of
    closure including the findings of your transport appraisal six months before the proposed closure
    in one local newspaper circulating near the proposed closure and in two national newspapers
    for two weeks continuously. Step three: open a twelve-week consultation
    period including public hearings where anyone who disagrees with the
    closure can protest. Once you’ve completed those
    three easy steps, then you’ll hand everything over to the Office of Rail and Road who will
    decide whether or not you can close the line. As you might have been able to tell from my
    not-at-all-sarcastic explanation, it’s not easy
    to close a franchised rail route, but nowhere in the agreement does it say how often Chiltern
    Railways has to operate their route to Paddington—it just says they need to. So they operate it…
    once per day. Now compared to the US where cities as big
    as Houston, Texas only see three trains a week and have stations that look
    like this, a daily service from Paddington probably
    seems normal, but the station this service goes to, High Wycombe, sees 95 trains a day
    from the normal London station—Marylebone. One train per day is nothing for a UK train
    route, especially from London. Chiltern Railways, like many other train companies,
    have decided it’s just easier and cheaper to operate an infrequent
    service to fulfill their franchise agreement instead
    of going through the rather expensive formal closure process. But some rail companies have pushed the boundaries
    of what is considered “service” to an extreme. Northern’s franchise agreement requires
    them to operate a train between Stockport and Stalybridge which they fulfill by running
    one train, one-way, once per week. Between
    Stockport and Stalybridge there are two stations which are therefore serviced by one train
    per week. Closing stations is just as difficult as closing
    lines so they won’t do it. Denton station
    therefore recorded only 144 passengers in the past year while Reddish South saw just
    94. Thirty
    miles to the north, London Midland is required to operate services to Barlaston Railway Station,
    but companies are allowed to temporarily operate rail replacement buses during maintenance. This company, however, has interpreted “temporary”
    as 13 years as they’ve operated rail replacement busses to this station since 2004
    to fulfill their obligation. The Chiltern Railways service from London
    Paddington to High Wycombe is definitively unprofitable. On many days there are zero passengers. On the day this footage was filmed, there
    was only one. This bureaucratic closure process is meant
    to protect the public by preventing companies from closing unprofitable smaller
    stations, but in reality most of what is does is make
    these ghost trains. If you’ve just realized “ghost train”
    is a great band name and want to make a website for
    your new group, you should try Squarespace. Squarespace makes building a website super
    simple with their customizable templates, powerful website builder, and 24/7 award-winning
    customer support. They even sell domains and the good news is
    that ghosttrain.band is available. Having a web presence for whatever you do
    is incredibly important since that will be what shows
    up on Google when someone searches for you. The good news is that you can build your website
    with Squarespace for 10% off by going to squarespace.com/HAI. I’ve used Squarespace for
    years because it just works and you should too by going to squarespace.com/HAI.

    Check out Sacramento State’s new planetarium
    Articles, Blog

    Check out Sacramento State’s new planetarium

    September 6, 2019


    [BLANK_AUDIO] Home sweet home, here it comes. Look at that, the famous blue marble. Hey, you guys see that little
    blue circle right there?>>[CROSSTALK]
    >>That’s where you’re sitting!>>[LAUGH]
    >>But that’s where you’re sitting. Uh-oh, we’re leaving! Back out to planet Earth. Everybody okay? Anybody throw up?>>Just 2 of the 88 that
    creep across the night sky. [BLANK_AUDIO]>>And
    we’re coming back into our solar system. And the constellations once again,
    look the way they should. It’s getting big. Don’t look right at it. I’m just kidding,
    you can look at it in the planetarium. When you go outside though
    don’t look right at it.>>[LAUGH]
    >>We’re gonna go past the next planet. Here comes Uranus. We have to pronounce it that
    way otherwise you guys giggle.>>[LAUGH]
    >>Now, you may know what this thing is called? The big red spot? Almost, it’s a little
    bit greater than that. The Great Red Spot.>>[LAUGH]
    >>Dust that clinks our view, [MUSIC] Letting us travel to the center of our galaxy. [BLANK_AUDIO]

    Articles

    Motorized LEGO Roller Coaster Train

    September 6, 2019


    Hey everyone, Jason here. Ever since LEGO released their new roller coaster track system I’ve been wanting to build a
    motorized train for it, and for this particular train I wanted to design it
    to be able to handle all of the possible features of the coaster system, so it can
    handle going up and down the steep slopes and all of the various grade
    changes that come along with that. And that imposed a few restrictions on the design, for example I couldn’t make the cars very long otherwise the front and
    back of the car would hit the track as it went through one of these dips. And
    those dips along with the really tight curves also requires that there be
    enough space between the cars so they don’t interfere with each other. You can
    see that the front and back car almost touched the motor when going through the
    dip, and similarly the sides almost touch when going through the curves. I also
    thought it’d be kind of cool to throwback to the old monorail system by
    putting the motor in this small central engine car, and this also has the added
    advantage of being able to easily run it in either direction. So let’s take a look
    at how it works. I have this standalone model of the
    engine car to show you what is going on and the drive system is pretty simple.
    There are two axles that drop down below the chassis of the engine car, on either
    side of the track, and each one of those axles drives a rubber tire alongside
    this lower sidewall of the track system. And it’s actually a really secure fit. I
    think you could even do some kind of suspended train this way as well. For
    tires I’m just using these basic small rubber tires which are pretty common, and
    normally they come on these little small wheel hubs, but they also happen to fit
    on these Technic half bushings which makes it really easy to drive them using
    a standard Technic axle. The spacing between the tracks is a little bit odd
    so on the chassis the axles have to be four and a half studs apart and so to
    achieve that I have one running through a standard Technic 1×2 brick with a
    single hole, and the other one is running through a
    Technic brick with two holes. As a result the engine car isn’t perfectly centered
    on the track it’s shifted about 1/4 of a stud off-center. And the connection to
    the motor which I’ve just removed here so you can more easily see what’s going
    on is through this central cross axle, which transfers power to each of the
    drive axles. For the other cars, I just have them mounted on the standard roller coaster car frames since they work really well with the coaster system, and
    to connect the cars together I’m using this small shaft with a ball joint on
    either end. Since the train is going through curves on the level and also
    going through grade changes you do need two degrees of freedom in that
    connection which is why I’m using the ball joints. And that is pretty much all
    there is to it. I have created building instructions for
    this basic train chassis which you can find, along with some other information about assembling your own train over at jkbrickworks.com. I’m actually looking forward to experimenting with some other train and engine designs, especially for just a flat track configuration. I think removing the steep hills will allow for some more flexibility in the train design and I’d love to design a longer El
    train that would look good running through a city display. I just need to
    get a couple more, well a lot more, of these straight tracks. These are the only
    two I have right now. If you want to see more original LEGO designs, be sure to
    subscribe. As usual thanks for watching, keep on building, and I’ll see you next
    time.

    Melbourne’s Rail Loop (Sydney metro copy)
    Articles, Blog

    Melbourne’s Rail Loop (Sydney metro copy)

    September 5, 2019


    [piano music] Transforming Melbourne! A brand new rail loop Clearing the old radial network and busting congestion This is Melbourne’s rail loop, a quality rail service never seen in Australia. Right now more than 100 trains come into Melbourne CBD in the busiest hour of the morning peak Built up over 160 years, our rail network is the most radial in the world Trains from 13 lines from all across Melbourne converge into the CBD. One delay, and you’ll miss your connection on another line, Overcrowded carriages, full platforms trains not spaced evenly, Something significant must be done. That’s why we must prepare for 30 years of construction, a brand new standalone rail loop, Melbourne’s rail loop, a solution to removing our reliance gang via the CBD to access jobs together Together with the additional airport rail lines, Melbourne’s rail loop will remove thousands of people of suburban trains all across Melbourne. In the morning peak, that would mean 60% less than now. The new spiderweb of our public transport network! Reducing crowding making room for an extra 100,000 passengers per hour across Melbourne We have new suburban stations and the capacity for a metro train every couple minutes in each direction This means less crowding at Flinders, Southern cross and North Melbourne Faster travel makes it easier to get to growth areas That means new choices for jobs education and more jobs The Melbourne rail loop clears our biggest downfall our radial rail network All our rail lines funnel traffic into Melbourne by how they converge towards one point Under streets these packed trains cause congestion as they cause issues across the whole network making the network away from the radial design with the new Metro Rail loop would mean we can allocate more trains to bypass the CBD in Addition the airport rail line would mean an extra six new metro trains per hour a train every 10 minutes between Melbourne and the airports Melbourne rail loop is being delivered in four stages Construction will be underway for the Northwest and southeast Suburbs with services to start in 2032 with a train every 4 minutes in the pink We have no idea when stages 3 & 4 will happen? Expect it to open in 2050. Helping to reduce the reliance on going through the CBD to access jobs across, Melbourne Melbourne trail loop builds the foundation for the future