Browsing Tag: cities

    Cities Skylines: German vibe Metro Ride through Westdale [4K]
    Articles, Blog

    Cities Skylines: German vibe Metro Ride through Westdale [4K]

    December 8, 2019


    S-Bahn Line 10, Nombfield Cross, please board please stand back Next station: Rivermouth East, connect to S-Bahn Line 5, Exit: left S-Bahn line 10, Rivermouth East, Exit: left please stand back Next station: Upnor Way, Exit: right S-Bahn Line 10, Upnor Way, Exit: right please stand back Next station: Giles Holt, connect to U-Bahn line 13, Exit: right S-Bahn Line 10, Giles Holt, Exit: right please stand back Next station: Mehringdamm, connect to Monorail Line 3, Exit: right S-Bahn Line 10, Mehringdamm, Exit: right please stand back Next station: Wofford Vale Hauptbahnhof, connect to RegionalBahn 10 and 11 Tram line 12 and bus line 53 and 76, exit: left Wofford Vale Hauptbahnhof, exit: left please stand back Next station: Capchester East, connect to S-Bahn Line 7, Exit: right S-Bahn Line 10, Capchester East, exit: right please stand back Next station: Reckby Park, connect to Monorail Line 4, exit: right S-Bahn Line 10, Reckby Park, Exit: right please stand back Next station: Nembrington Green, S-Bahn Line 10 last station, exit: left S-Bahn line 10 last station, Nembrington Green, Exit: left

    Articles

    Top 10 Future U.S. MEGAPROJECTS

    November 19, 2019


    These are ten megaprojects the U.S. desperately
    needs to complete in the near future. They each represent many other projects awaiting
    approval and funding in cities and towns across America. A bullet train in Texas would help ease traffic
    in Houston and Dallas that will only get worse as the lonestar state continues to grow. A road trip from one city to the other will
    take up to 6.5 hours in the next twenty years. Modelled after Japan’s Shinkansen train,
    the Texas Central High-Speed Rail will cut that journey to just over three hours thanks
    to max speeds of 250 miles per hour. Heavy rains in 2015 breached more than 50
    dams in South Carolina, causing flooding throughout the state. It’s an emergency that will keep happening
    if the more than 600 dams rated as high-hazard aren’t modernized. Dams are aging nationwide and need more than
    $20 billion in repairs and upgrades. The Washington DC area has some of the worst
    traffic in the country. Extending the existing metro system to the
    suburbs by adding another metro line with 21 new stations will make everyone’s commute
    shorter, and will take an estimated 17,000 cars off the road. Denver has an ambitious plan to take back
    land from the interstate by plunging part of the I-70 East underground to create a large
    park with sports fields and performance spaces. The project will also modernize and widen
    the 60-plus-year-old road to ensure its structural integrity and ease congestion within the sprawling
    Denver area. Miami is already dealing with the effects
    of climate change with the installation of 80 pumping stations. But when sea levels rise just 5 more feet,
    96% of the city will be underwater, making it America’s most vulnerable urban area
    to a changing climate. To survive, it will need to significantly
    expand its levee system and build a multi-billion dollar seawall. The highly populated northeast corridor of
    the U.S. desperately needs to expand its high speed rail network to keep pace with the best
    cities in the world. Right now, the fastest train is the Acela,
    whose top speed is just 125 miles per hour. A maglev train connecting New York to DC could
    hit 300 mph and cut the commute from four hours to one. Old sewer lines aren’t properly functioning,
    resulting in raw sewage streaming into Lake Erie from Cleveland during storms. Project clean lake is a 25-year renewal plan
    that uses a variety of green methods, including the construction of seven tunnels, to solve
    the problem. To allow for more people and goods to pass
    through the Detroit-Windsor, Canada section of the border, the Gordie Howe International
    Bridge will provide uninterrupted traffic flow. When complete, the project will increase daily
    vehicle crossings by 30%. Phase 1 of California’s high speed rail
    project should open by 2030. It aims to connect Los Angeles to San Francisco
    in just three hours, compared to the nearly six hours it now takes to drive the route. It will be the first high speed rail project
    on the U.S. west coast and will eventually extend to San Diego and Sacramento, the state’s
    capitol. 200,000 daily passenger trips are made through
    the only rail tunnel connecting Manhattan and New Jersey. 100 years old and severely damaged by Hurricane
    Sandy, it badly needs an upgrade. The proposed Hudson River Rail Tunnel
    megaproject would modernize the existing tunnel and add a second one in order to ease congestion
    and wait time for commuters. This episode was sponsored by Dollar Shave
    Club. They have a brand new deal you’ve got to
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    by delivering high quality razors right to your door. And, if you go to www.dollarshaveclub.com/TDC,
    link in the description, you get a one month trial of any razor for a buck. They’ve also got shampoo and shave butter
    that I used this morning that has me smelling good and feeling smooth. So what are you waiting for? Go to www.dolarshaveclub.com/TDC, link in
    the description, and get their best for a buck! For TDC, I’m Bryce Plank. Until tomorrow, thanks for watching.

    What is a Railway Station?
    Articles, Blog

    What is a Railway Station?

    November 16, 2019


    What is a station? A station is where society meets the railway. A place where passengers board and alight from trains. A place of work for those who operate it, with all the attendant facilities, yet which also offers a full range of passenger amenities. For those using the station, it is also the place via which they access and interact with the city, with the local economy and with other modes of transport – whether their onward journey is local or long-distance. Looking at stations around the world, there seems to be no end to the possible permutations of this basic concept. Though each member of the International Union of Railways has its own take on what rail travel represents, they nevertheless work together to enhance both their own stations and stations in general. What, then, are the priority topics and objectives in their work? Firstly, their work aims to make the in-station user experience as enjoyable as possible. Growing Intermodality means that the range of transport services to and from stations is increasingly complex. To help passengers find their way around, the relevant information must be provided in the right place at the right time. A usable station will thus feature a combination of easily-understandable signage, digital technology which meets and anticipates travellers’ needs, and helpful staff. But the user experience is also about perceived quality. For stations to be more attractive, they must become more accessible, comfortable, better connected places which offer top-quality services and an attractive range of shopping opportunities, and which run smoothly thanks to successful collaboration between stakeholders. Sharing experience and achievements provides UIC members with inspiration and helps them make headway on their own projects. Their second major concern is security: what is the best way to oversee events and prevent risks, and with which technology staff and methods? Security is an area in which we can always learn from others’ experience. Thirdly, they look at how to make stations more sustainable. Whether it be on energy use, waste and water management, or their carbon footprint, many stations have already done great things in this field. But there is still plenty to discuss and no end of solutions to be found. To make headway on these and many other topics, UIC members may promote the use of UIC’s existing “International Railway Solutions”, as well as sharing best practice, commissioning research into new solutions, and participating in international projects. Alongside this, every two years UIC organises the “Next Station” conference, at which station designers, builders and managers, policymakers, financiers, architects, urban planners and a host of other stakeholders come together to learn about recent developments and engage in discussions and joint thinking. One day, this sharing of ideas will produce the station of the future. Will this be more open, more integrated into urban life? Will it have new functionalities? And how will it adapt to changing patterns of behavior? No one knows. One thing, though, is certain: stations will still be places where society meets the railway, and will continue to give every journey by train that touch of enchantment.

    Your Legislators: Light Rail (March 12, 2015)
    Articles, Blog

    Your Legislators: Light Rail (March 12, 2015)

    October 21, 2019


    >>VIEWER IS CONCERNED ABOUT
    TRAIN SERVICE FROM DULUTH TO   TRAIN SERVICE FROM DULUTH TO
    MINNEAPOLIS.   MINNEAPOLIS.
    IS THERE ANYTHING HAPPENING ON   IS THERE ANYTHING HAPPENING ON
    THAT AND THERE’S BEEN DISCUSSION   THAT AND THERE’S BEEN DISCUSSION
    OF THAT.   OF THAT.
    WHAT ABOUT YOU SENATOR SENJEM,   WHAT ABOUT YOU SENATOR SENJEM,
    WHAT DO YOU THINK?   WHAT DO YOU THINK?
    >>I DON’T KNOW ABOUT DULUTH BUT  >>I DON’T KNOW ABOUT DULUTH BUT
    THE ROCHESTER POSSIBILITY IS   THE ROCHESTER POSSIBILITY IS
    IT’S BEING RELEASED THAT WHEN   IT’S BEING RELEASED THAT WHEN
    AND IF THIS EVER HAPPENS, IT   AND IF THIS EVER HAPPENS, IT
    WILL BE A PRIVATE VENTURE WITH   WILL BE A PRIVATE VENTURE WITH
    PRIVATE MONEY TO BOTH BUILD IT   PRIVATE MONEY TO BOTH BUILD IT
    AND OPERATE IT AND ALBEIT THE   AND OPERATE IT AND ALBEIT THE
    MONEY ISN’T GOING TO BE MADE ON   MONEY ISN’T GOING TO BE MADE ON
    THE PASSION TO TRAFFIC ITSELF   THE PASSION TO TRAFFIC ITSELF
    BUT THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENTS   BUT THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENTS
    AROUND THE STOP SITES RELATE TO   AROUND THE STOP SITES RELATE TO
    DO THIS TRAIN.   DO THIS TRAIN.
    WE WERE TOLD POSSIBLY THERE WILL   WE WERE TOLD POSSIBLY THERE WILL
    BE AN ANNOUNCEMENT, AND THIS   BE AN ANNOUNCEMENT, AND THIS
    MONTH WE WILL SEE, BUT IT’S ALL   MONTH WE WILL SEE, BUT IT’S ALL
    BEING AT LEAST PORTRAYED RIGHT   BEING AT LEAST PORTRAYED RIGHT
    NOW AS A PRIVATE INVESTMENT   NOW AS A PRIVATE INVESTMENT
    ALONG THE PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY.   ALONG THE PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY.
    >>THERE DOES STILL CONTINUE TO  >>THERE DOES STILL CONTINUE TO
    BE SOME INTEREST IN INTRACITY   BE SOME INTEREST IN INTRACITY
    PASSENGER RAIL AND THE ROUTES WE   PASSENGER RAIL AND THE ROUTES WE
    HAVE STUDIED OR THE CONNECTION   HAVE STUDIED OR THE CONNECTION
    BETWEEN THE TWIN CITIES AND   BETWEEN THE TWIN CITIES AND
    CHICAGO, AND THE CONNECTION TO   CHICAGO, AND THE CONNECTION TO
    DULUTH AND NORTHERN LIGHTS   DULUTH AND NORTHERN LIGHTS
    EXPRESS.   EXPRESS.
    THE ZIP LINE, AND A LOT OF   THE ZIP LINE, AND A LOT OF
    PRELIMINARY WORK HAS BEEN DONE,   PRELIMINARY WORK HAS BEEN DONE,
    AND AS THEY LOOK AT THE   AND AS THEY LOOK AT THE
    SIGHTING.   SIGHTING.
    IT IT SLOWED DOWN SOMEWHAT BY   IT IT SLOWED DOWN SOMEWHAT BY
    THE FACT THAT THE FEDERAL   THE FACT THAT THE FEDERAL
    GOVERNMENT RIGHT NOW CAN’T SEEM   GOVERNMENT RIGHT NOW CAN’T SEEM
    TO PASS A TRANSPORTATION BILL   TO PASS A TRANSPORTATION BILL
    THAT’S LONG-TERM.   THAT’S LONG-TERM.
    WHEN JIM OBERSTAR WAS STILL   WHEN JIM OBERSTAR WAS STILL
    THERE AND CHAIRING THE   THERE AND CHAIRING THE
    COMMITTEE, HE HAD ACTUALLY A   COMMITTEE, HE HAD ACTUALLY A
    PROPOSAL ON THE TABLE WHICH   PROPOSAL ON THE TABLE WHICH
    WOULD HAVE BEEN A TEN-YEAR BILL,   WOULD HAVE BEEN A TEN-YEAR BILL,
    THAT WOULD HAVE ALLOWED STATES   THAT WOULD HAVE ALLOWED STATES
    TO PLAN, AND THAT BID INCLUDED   TO PLAN, AND THAT BID INCLUDED
    FUNDING FOR ALL MODES INCLUDING   FUNDING FOR ALL MODES INCLUDING
    INTERCITY PASSENGER RAIL.   INTERCITY PASSENGER RAIL.
    WE HAVE SLOWED DOWN A GREAT DEAL   WE HAVE SLOWED DOWN A GREAT DEAL
    ON THAT PLAN.   ON THAT PLAN.
    >>THE PLAN FROM DULUTH TO THE  >>THE PLAN FROM DULUTH TO THE
    TWIN CITIES WOULD NOT BE SHARING   TWIN CITIES WOULD NOT BE SHARING
    THE AMTRAK TRAIL.   THE AMTRAK TRAIL.
    >>THAT WOULD BE A POSSIBILITY  >>THAT WOULD BE A POSSIBILITY
    OF ACTUAL SUCCESS, IF YOU ARE   OF ACTUAL SUCCESS, IF YOU ARE
    PUTTING ANYTHING ON, YOU ARE   PUTTING ANYTHING ON, YOU ARE
    COMPETING WITH OIL, THE REGULAR   COMPETING WITH OIL, THE REGULAR
    FREIGHT, THE GRAIN, AND YOU KIND   FREIGHT, THE GRAIN, AND YOU KIND
    OF GET SQUEEZED OUT.   OF GET SQUEEZED OUT.
    THE REABILITY OF THAT IS WHAT   THE REABILITY OF THAT IS WHAT
    MAKES IT LESS THAN SUCCESSFUL.   MAKES IT LESS THAN SUCCESSFUL.
    YOU CAN’T COUNT ON IT TO GET   YOU CAN’T COUNT ON IT TO GET
    WHERE YOU ARE GOING ON TIME.   WHERE YOU ARE GOING ON TIME.
    ANY OF THESE WOULD HAVE TO BE   ANY OF THESE WOULD HAVE TO BE
    BETTER THAN AMTRAK, TOO, BECAUSE   BETTER THAN AMTRAK, TOO, BECAUSE
    AMTRAK CAN GET YOU WHERE YOU ARE   AMTRAK CAN GET YOU WHERE YOU ARE
    GOING ON TIME I THINK IT WILL BE   GOING ON TIME I THINK IT WILL BE
    A WHILE UNTIL WE SEE.   A WHILE UNTIL WE SEE.
    WE HAVE A SHORT LINE THAT RUNS   WE HAVE A SHORT LINE THAT RUNS
    FROM FARGO TO MORE HEAD.   FROM FARGO TO MORE HEAD.
    SOME SUGGEST WE COULD PUT A   SOME SUGGEST WE COULD PUT A
    PASSENGER ON IT.   PASSENGER ON IT.
    BUT IT’S RATED AT ABOUT 10 MILES   BUT IT’S RATED AT ABOUT 10 MILES
    PER HOUR.   PER HOUR.
    A SLOW LITTLE JOURNEY.   A SLOW LITTLE JOURNEY.
    >>AND.  >>AND.
    >>PROBABLY NOT DESTINED FOR IT.  >>PROBABLY NOT DESTINED FOR IT.
    >>AND THERE’S, I WOULD SAY,  >>AND THERE’S, I WOULD SAY,
    NOTHING SHORT OF MASSIVE   NOTHING SHORT OF MASSIVE
    RESISTANCE TO GOING OVER FARM   RESISTANCE TO GOING OVER FARM
    HAPPENED AND BREAKING NEW GROUND   HAPPENED AND BREAKING NEW GROUND
    FOR THESE.   FOR THESE.
    >>LOOKING MUCH MORE AT THE  >>LOOKING MUCH MORE AT THE
    HIGHWAY 52 CORRIDOR.   HIGHWAY 52 CORRIDOR.
    >>ANY THOUGHTS ON TRAINS?  >>ANY THOUGHTS ON TRAINS?
    >>AND I HAVE HEARD STORIES FROM  >>AND I HAVE HEARD STORIES FROM
    PEOPLE WHO HAVE BEEN TRAVELING   PEOPLE WHO HAVE BEEN TRAVELING
    BY PASSENGER RAIL.   BY PASSENGER RAIL.
    OF NOT BEING ABLE TO GET TO THE   OF NOT BEING ABLE TO GET TO THE
    LOCATION DESTINATION ON TIME,   LOCATION DESTINATION ON TIME,
    AND I DO THINK THAT THAT IS A   AND I DO THINK THAT THAT IS A
    MAJOR ISSUE THAT NEEDS TO BE   MAJOR ISSUE THAT NEEDS TO BE
    ADDRESSED, AND THE RAILS HAVE   ADDRESSED, AND THE RAILS HAVE
    BEEN TALKING ABOUT DOUBLE   BEEN TALKING ABOUT DOUBLE
    TRACKING TO RELIEF SOME OF THE   TRACKING TO RELIEF SOME OF THE
    CONGESTION ON THE RAILS, BUT   CONGESTION ON THE RAILS, BUT
    THAT CREATES MORE CONGESTION OFF   THAT CREATES MORE CONGESTION OFF
    THE RAILS TRYING TO GET ACROSS   THE RAILS TRYING TO GET ACROSS
    THE TRACKS, BECAUSE YOU ARE   THE TRACKS, BECAUSE YOU ARE
    GOING TO HAVE TWO RAILS NOW THAT   GOING TO HAVE TWO RAILS NOW THAT
    YOU ARE TRYING TO GET ACROSS.   YOU ARE TRYING TO GET ACROSS.
    THIS INCREASES THE NEED FOR   THIS INCREASES THE NEED FOR
    UNDERPASS AND THINGS OF THAT   UNDERPASS AND THINGS OF THAT
    NATURE AGAIN.   NATURE AGAIN.
    THERE’S REAL RAILROADS AND ARE A   THERE’S REAL RAILROADS AND ARE A
    SIGNIFICANT ISSUE WE ARE GOING   SIGNIFICANT ISSUE WE ARE GOING
    TO HAVE TO GRAPPLE WITH THIS   TO HAVE TO GRAPPLE WITH THIS
    SESSION.   SESSION.
    >>AND PEOPLE MAYBE GREW UP AND  >>AND PEOPLE MAYBE GREW UP AND
    TRAINS ARE ON THE DOWNHILL   TRAINS ARE ON THE DOWNHILL
    SLIDE.   SLIDE.
    SAME THING WITH CHARLIE’S, AND   SAME THING WITH CHARLIE’S, AND
    YOU LOOK AT THE EARLY HISTORY OF   YOU LOOK AT THE EARLY HISTORY OF
    THE TWIN CITIES, AND THEY HAD   THE TWIN CITIES, AND THEY HAD
    TROLLEYS EVERY MINUTE, FULL OF   TROLLEYS EVERY MINUTE, FULL OF
    PEOPLE.   PEOPLE.
    PEOPLE THINK THAT’S PRETTY   PEOPLE THINK THAT’S PRETTY
    ROMANTIC AND THEY WOULD KIND OF   ROMANTIC AND THEY WOULD KIND OF
    LIKE TO SEE THAT AGAIN.   LIKE TO SEE THAT AGAIN.
    THAT’S WHERE THE LIGHT RAIL   THAT’S WHERE THE LIGHT RAIL
    COMES IN AGAIN.   COMES IN AGAIN.
    >>AND WITH YOUNG PEOPLE, THE 20  >>AND WITH YOUNG PEOPLE, THE 20
    AND 30-YEAR-OLDS, THEY WANT IT,   AND 30-YEAR-OLDS, THEY WANT IT,
    AND THEY ARE GOING TO THE CITIES   AND THEY ARE GOING TO THE CITIES
    THAT HAVE IT.   THAT HAVE IT.
    THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY KNOWS   THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY KNOWS
    THAT’S THE GENERATION WE NEED   THAT’S THE GENERATION WE NEED
    FOR THE FUTURE.   FOR THE FUTURE.
    WE USED TO THINK OF THE CAR AS   WE USED TO THINK OF THE CAR AS
    FREEDOM, AND THEY THINK OF NO   FREEDOM, AND THEY THINK OF NO
    CAR AS FREEDOM.   CAR AS FREEDOM.
    THEY WANT TO BE ABLE TO WALK AND   THEY WANT TO BE ABLE TO WALK AND
    BIKE AND TAKE MASS TRANSIT TO   BIKE AND TAKE MASS TRANSIT TO
    LIVE WHERE THEY WORK, AND DENVER   LIVE WHERE THEY WORK, AND DENVER
    IS GETTING MORE OF THAT   IS GETTING MORE OF THAT
    POPULATION THAN WE ARE, AND THE   POPULATION THAN WE ARE, AND THE
    BUSINESS COMMUNITY NOTICES THAT,   BUSINESS COMMUNITY NOTICES THAT,
    AND AT LEAST HERE THE ST. PAUL   AND AT LEAST HERE THE ST. PAUL
    CHAMBER, THE GREATER   CHAMBER, THE GREATER
    MINNEAPOLIS, AND TWIN WEST HAVE  

    Growing up: The story of ION light rail in Waterloo Region | Trailer
    Articles, Blog

    Growing up: The story of ION light rail in Waterloo Region | Trailer

    October 17, 2019


    [Music plays throughout] People wonder what’s in the water here. Flip back through the pages and paragraphs of this community’s history and you can see why that’s a question asked with a straight face and a notebook in hand. This place its got a gift for peering
    beyond the horizon, for resilience in the face of adversity. Over the past century and a half,
    its attracted farmers, craftspeople, industrialists, academics, and
    tech startups to its streets and fields. And its rolled with the punches. [crowd cheering] Its dusted itself off following
    the decline of manufacturing and the automotive nosedive. Its redefined its image marrying
    new ideas with old buildings. Breathing life into abandoned spaces. [key opening in lock] Recently, like others, Waterloo Region
    began to push its urban limits towards the countryside. Sprawling across the
    rich fields that give us food, groundwater, and a special connection to
    a rural landscape. But unlike many others it sat up and took notice that a unique way of life was slowly eroding. In a community of three robust cities and
    four pastoral townships, maintaining a rural/urban balance is no easy feat, but that’s the tightrope this community walks every day. Waterloo Region had a decision to make. Allow the urban limits to push further
    into its farmland or contain that growth in the downtown cores. It would be a hard decision that would
    shape the community for generations to come and establish these past few years as a historic period in the ongoing story of Waterloo Region. [fireworks play throughout]

    Top 10 Largest Cities by 2030 | The B1M
    Articles, Blog

    Top 10 Largest Cities by 2030 | The B1M

    October 11, 2019


    By 2030, the global population will have grown
    to over 8.5 billion people. 60% of them will live in cities and one in every three people will live in a city with over 500,000 inhabitants. This trend, means it’s more important than
    ever to get our built environment right – by 2030, it will literally be shaping the way that more than half the people on earth are able to live their lives. Our cities are already facing a wide range
    of challenges from improving air quality and ensuring the efficiency of transport infrastructure,
    to the responsible sourcing and delivery of food and water, housing demand, social cohesion,
    equality and the risk of flooding – to name just a few. Technology, data management and
    the emergence of new economic and political models are all playing a part in helping
    address these challenges. So what are the main regions of focus? The
    next 12 years will see a huge shake-up in the ranking of the world’ largest cities,
    as growth in urban areas across North America and Europe slows in relative terms, whilst
    booming across Asia and Africa. Here, we take a look at the 10 largest cities
    by 2030, as predicted by the United Nations’ World Urbanization Prospects. Held by Shanghai in 1950, and by New York
    in 2015, Mexico City will take 10th place on the global ranking of the world’s largest
    cities by 2030. The sprawling capital of Mexico is already
    one of the most important cultural and financial centers of the Americas. Its phenomenal growth
    since the 1980s has been accompanied by air pollution and transport infrastructure issues,
    but the city has moved to address these and now has a clear plan for sustainable development
    in place up to 2030. The city has since a number of built environment
    innovations in recent years including “smog-eating” buildings which help to combat air pollution
    and the engineering of “earthquake-proof” skyscrapers to withstand the regions seismic
    activity. With a forecast annual economic growth rate
    of 5.1% over the next 12 years, Lagos is set to overtake Johannesburg to become Africa’s
    largest city by 2030. Already a vast urban area of Nigera, Lagos
    has the highest GDP of any city on the African continent and is home to one of its largest
    and busiest ports. The projected rates of expansion and growth
    present a significant challenge for the city over the next decade. Its population is also
    much younger than that of other cities on our list, creating a powerful demographic
    opportunity, but also posing a risk, as the city absorbs millions of young people into
    the urban labour force, while managing the political instability that could entail if
    youth unemployment soars. Despite not appearing in the top 10 back in
    1950, Cairo is set to move up from its 9th place ranking in 2015 to become the world’s
    8th largest city by 2030. With an urban area that already extends over
    600 square kilometres, Egypt’s sprawling capital is currently grappling with air and
    water pollution issues, along with it’s infamous traffic congestion. With the city
    set to become home to over 24.5 million people by 2030, plans to cut emissions and construct
    a new sewer system are now in development. With a projected population of nearly 25 million
    people, Karachi will enter this list for the first time by 2030. Despite its turbulent past and well-publicised
    infrastructure challenges, the city remains a major cultural and economic centre and a
    key port on the Indian Ocean – fuelling its expansion over the next 12 years. While sixth place was held by Moscow with
    5.4 million residents in 1950, it will belong to Dhaka by 2030. Already the fourth most densely populated
    city in the world, the capital of Bangladesh will grow its population from just under 19
    million people in 2018, to over 27 million in 12 years’ time. Despite being a major financial centre, the
    city is prone to flooding and grappling with traffic congestion. The first phase of its
    new metro is due to open in 2021. Moving up from 7th place in 2015 to 5th place
    by 2030, is China’s vast capital Beijing. Standing as the political centre of the nation
    for more than eight centuries, Beijing combines seven UNESCO World Heritage Sites with the
    modern architecture and infrastructure of one of today’s foremost capital cities. However, its expansion has not been without its challenges and ongoing programmes are
    now working to tackle traffic congestion, improve air quality and ensure the retention
    of historic sites over the next decade of growth. Just ahead of Beijing and moving up one place
    from the 2015 rankings, is India’s leading financial hub, Mumbai. With thriving commercial and entertainment
    industries coupled with high living standards, Mumbai will continue to attract residents
    from across India and the wider region over the next decade. Breaking the 30 million mark and moving up
    from its 10th place ranking in 1950 is China’s largest city, Shanghai. The urban area has seen intense development since the introduction of economic reforms
    in the early 1990s. Already home to the world’s busiest container port and the financial centre of one of the world’s leading economies, Shanghai will continue to expand over the
    next 12 years, ranking as the third largest city in the world in 2030. Taking second place is Delhi, India’s capital
    and current most populated city. With GDP set to grow by 7.1% a year, Delhi
    will outperform its nearest Indian rival Mumbai up to 2030. Air pollution remains a significant
    challenge, with the World Health Organisation naming it as the most polluted city in the
    world in 2014. Despite many initiatives, the expansion of the metro and measures to curb emissions, concerns remain around the levels of air pollution in Delhi and their projected growth as the city expands. With an astonishing population of over 37
    million people, Japan’s capital Tokyo is set to top our list. Tokyo is already the largest city in the world
    and will retain its position from the 2015 rankings will almost no change in the
    size of its population between now and 2030. The city has a lot going for it – it’s
    a leading financial and political centre, has the highest GDP of any urban area, was ranked first in the 2017 Safe Cities Index and is set to host the Olympic Games in 2020. By 2030 the city is set to further improve it transport infrastructure, reduce air pollution and further enhance standards of living. Looking even further ahead, the Global Cities Institute projects that Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, will be the most populous
    city in the world by 2075, and that by 2100, it will be surpassed by Lagos in Nigeria – which
    will then be home to 88 million people. If you enjoyed this video and would like to get more from the definitive video channel for construction, subscribe to The B1M.

    Cities: Skylines – “Mass Transit” Announcement Trailer
    Articles, Blog

    Cities: Skylines – “Mass Transit” Announcement Trailer

    October 1, 2019


    What a fine day. There are commuters around. They travel in things that makes new kinds
    of sound. They glide through the water, atop our new
    fleet. A shine new ferry will help you. Toot-Suite. To the land now we find our attention is drifting. Up the mountain our cable cars go, how uplifting! Hear the cry of an eagle and the coo of a
    pigeon. But I don’t hear traffic not even a smidgen. And yet higher our blimp awaits in the sky. Mass Transit is coming. Why not give it a try?

    What if there was an EARTH METRO RAIL? (Geography Now!)
    Articles, Blog

    What if there was an EARTH METRO RAIL? (Geography Now!)

    September 6, 2019


    This episode is brought to you by the Great Courses plus Hey, geogrphy peeps, so I got another little topic for you guys to pontificate. I recently came across this image by Chris Gray from West Yorkshire, depicting his vision for a global metro system. It looks amazing, it has hundreds of different stations on 20 different lines, each reaching a different region of the planet – and it kind of got my gears spinning. First of all I Love trains. I love metro systems. They totally beat traffic. You know at first glance this picture You know it looks kind of fun yet a little far-fetched considering that a lot of the lines traverse what seems like impossible boundaries and the entire Pacific Ocean But what if. What would it take to make this a reality? Well first of all this map misses a few countries. Especially in oceania and the Caribbean and it doesn’t go to antarctica, but that’s okay. We can make that happen later. First of all there’s a few things you have to consider. If we were to literally connect every single continent on the planet it would take a lot of time energy and resources to an extent that the world has never seen before also It might be wise to make a lot of these trains hyper loops as to cut down the travel time with long distances which would also allow more people to travel. Now the first thing you would have to consider would be diplomacy and permission on which areas to build. If we were to connect North and South America, it’s unlikely that panama would open up the darién gap due to the indigenous tribes that refused to build on their land so we might have to build over the ocean into Colombia. That one section of land if it would just open up! Also keep in mind that unless if some kind of miracle Agreement was made it is most likely that people going to armenia would only be allowed to board a North-South train Line going through Georgia and Iran Due to the closed-off borders between turkey and Azerbaijan. Maybe North Korea would allow a train going in through either China or Vladivostok in Russia But I highly doubt there would be a simple Stopover between them and Seoul South Korea that means that if Chinese people want to visit South Korea they would either have to build a really long sea crossing line from the shandong peninsula to incheon or they would have to take a line through Taiwan and the yeah Yama and Okinawa Prefecture island up to Kyushu and then across to Busan and you get a lot of strange scenarios like that all over. I mean there’s that weird strange thing between Algeria and Morocco Ukraine and Russia Iraq and Uzbekistan are just a nightmare and unless you have the right Visa Belarus would probably just kick you out which brings us to the next part I really like the tactic that this guy had for transatlantic oceanic lines for North America He connected Canada to greenland to Iceland to scotland utilizing maximum land crossings at the shortest distance But with South America for some reason he decided to connect Belém brazil with Conakry guinea I don’t know exactly why he chose those cities for me a more reasonable route might be for Stella – maybe Dakar senegal or if You want minimal distance maybe in that tall – Freetown Sierra leone with a quick stopover in Ela Fernando? De Noronha off the coast to cross the pacific Of course Hawaii would have to be like the main central hub and then from there You could go to either kid or bus or the marshall Islands or hey? Why not both? It’s our imaginations We can do whatever we want. No rules up here. Yeah now if this map did go to antarctica I would suggest extending the purple America Line to Tierra Del Fuego Somehow traversing the Impossible Patagonia Glaciers and somehow without dying during the construction process reaching King George Island and from there It’s just a bunch of quick island hops until you hit gram land on the antarctic Peninsula and just be mindful building the train on Solid ground and not an unstable ice shelf and there you go now the big question what are all of the factors Elements and variables that would have to go into the mix to make this become a reality well the answer is Insanity now one thing we can consider to alleviate some of the cost is using some of the train lines We already have so that we don’t have to build a new one now I counted and it seems like with the exception of some train lines in North America Europe Russia China, India and Australia most of these lines actually don’t exist. So let’s assume We’re funding maybe about 75% of all these train lines That’s still a lot each line might cost differently based off of the terrain or ease of transport for material it would be a lot easier to transport materials over the flat plains of Russia rather than the middle of the ocean by Fiji also Are you passing through a row area or through a city because it costs more to build underneath the city then you have to consider? The Labor Force how many people are well equipped with the proper training to construct such a project how long would it take to invest? In the training of people who aren’t also you have to consider the hiring of people to mine the raw? Materials to bring to the factories to shape and mold into the train tracks and the trains themselves And how many people would it take and then you have to consider wages people in different countries get paid different wages and the oceanic Lines especially ones crossing the Pacific would probably cost the most they would probably have to be hyperloop due to the incredibly long Distances and they would have to be very strong and solid due to the fact that you know it’s the Pacific Ocean there’s cyclones There’s crazy things happening all the time They gotta be Solid oh and also consider that a transoceanic train has never been done before which by the way if you didn’t know there actually are Some hyperloop companies out there like hyperloop one or trans Pod that are in the alpha Stages of capital fundraising and researching It’s so cool. Look it up I did the math and factoring absolutely everything I could possibly think of into this whole equation I came around a number somewhere around either 65 to 94 Trillion dollars although it could be a lot more based off of so many factors that I missed out on in the end We live in a time in which air travel is the preferred method of long distance Journeys however Is that really the best way and is it the most efficient is it possible that ground? Transportation and hyperloop technology could bring us into a brand new era of unimaginable global possibility. What do you think it? What do you think about a global metro system? What destinations would you like to see being built I personally think a West Coast, California La to the Polynesian Islands train line would be the coolest thing ever and with that being said I have three very important announcements You’re going to want to listen to at least one of them the first thing that the great courses plus contacted us And they want to sponsor geography now again wahoo for those of you that don’t know the great courses plus is a website with over 7,000 online courses from all across the academic spectrum taught by highly accredited Professors and professionals many ivy league trains they have classes and so many different things like science weightlifting chess art There’s a really cool course called inventions that change the world by professor w bernard Carlsen I recommend it right now They are offering a free one-month trial Or if you really like it you can even sign up and join for a plan at really good rates All you have to do is go to this website here the great courses plus comm slash geography Or you can click on the link in my description. Thanks great courses plus you guys are always there for me You guys rock my next announcement Is that the heritage trip is? Completely funded and ready to go and happen in October with me and my mom thanks to Patreon Patrons I was able to buy the flight tickets and have a side budget for other things like trains and food you made it happen So thank you so much patreon patrons and finally my last Announcement as you know august is upon us which means the school year will soon begin for all students which means I want to visit your school earlier this year I got to visit the cool kids at Centennial High School in Corona, California And now it’s time to see more after the heritage trip in October I want to have a geography bee at your school as of right now I can only travel in North America as I’ll be using my own money to fund the travel cost for me Brandon and ken it’s A little outside of my budget to travel outside of the continent So maybe in the future of geography now gets bigger But right now I can only travel within North America and for sure I have to visit at least one place in Canada I promise you kentucky’s that I would visit before this year is over because I got to celebrate with your 150th anniversary I will be holding a contest and whichever schools win. I will visit details will come next week, so stay tuned in the meantime Thank you for watching this video. I hope you got something out of it subscribe if you want and a stay cool stay tuned

    James Kunstler: How bad architecture wrecked cities
    Articles, Blog

    James Kunstler: How bad architecture wrecked cities

    August 30, 2019


    The immersive ugliness of our everyday environments in America is entropy made visible. We can’t overestimate the amount of despair that we are generating with places like this. And mostly, I want to persuade you that we have to do better if we’re going to continue the project of civilization in America. By the way, this doesn’t help. Nobody’s having a better day down here because of that. There are a lot of ways you can describe this. You know, I like to call it “the national automobile slum.” You can call it suburban sprawl. I think it’s appropriate to call it the greatest misallocation of resources in the history of the world. You can call it a technosis externality clusterfuck. And it’s a tremendous problem for us. The outstanding — the salient problem about this for us is that these are places that are not worth caring about. We’re going to talk about that some more. A sense of place: your ability to create places that are meaningful and places of quality and character depends entirely on your ability to define space with buildings, and to employ the vocabularies, grammars, syntaxes, rhythms and patterns of architecture in order to inform us who we are. The public realm in America has two roles: it is the dwelling place of our civilization and our civic life, and it is the physical manifestation of the common good. And when you degrade the public realm, you will automatically degrade the quality of your civic life and the character of all the enactments of your public life and communal life that take place there. The public realm comes mostly in the form of the street in America because we don’t have the 1,000-year-old cathedral plazas and market squares of older cultures. And your ability to define space and to create places that are worth caring about all comes from a body of culture that we call the culture of civic design. This is a body of knowledge, method, skill and principle that we threw in the garbage after World War II and decided we don’t need that anymore; we’re not going to use it. And consequently, we can see the result all around us. The public realm has to inform us not only where we are geographically, but it has to inform us where we are in our culture. Where we’ve come from, what kind of people we are, and it needs to, by doing that, it needs to afford us a glimpse to where we’re going in order to allow us to dwell in a hopeful present. And if there is one tremendous — if there is one great catastrophe about the places that we’ve built, the human environments we’ve made for ourselves in the last 50 years, it is that it has deprived us of the ability to live in a hopeful present. The environments we are living in, more typically, are like these. You know, this happens to be the asteroid belt of architectural garbage two miles north of my town. And remember, to create a place of character and quality, you have to be able to define space. So how is that being accomplished here? If you stand on the apron of the Wal-Mart over here and try to look at the Target store over here, you can’t see it because of the curvature of the Earth. (Laughter) That’s nature’s way of telling you that you’re doing a poor job of defining space. Consequently, these will be places that nobody wants to be in. These will be places that are not worth caring about. We have about, you know, 38,000 places that are not worth caring about in the United States today. When we have enough of them, we’re going to have a nation that’s not worth defending. And I want you to think about that when you think about those young men and women who are over in places like Iraq, spilling their blood in the sand, and ask yourself, “What is their last thought of home?” I hope it’s not the curb cut between the Chuck E. Cheese and the Target store because that’s not good enough for Americans to be spilling their blood for. (Applause) We need better places in this country. Public space. This is a good public space. It’s a place worth caring about. It’s well defined. It is emphatically an outdoor public room. It has something that is terribly important — it has what’s called an active and permeable membrane around the edge. That’s a fancy way of saying it’s got shops, bars, bistros, destinations — things go in and out of it. It’s permeable. The beer goes in and out, the waitresses go in and out, and that activates the center of this place and makes it a place that people want to hang out in. You know, in these places in other cultures, people just go there voluntarily because they like them. We don’t have to have a craft fair here to get people to come here. (Laughter) You know, you don’t have to have a Kwanzaa festival. People just go because it’s pleasurable to be there. But this is how we do it in the United States. Probably the most significant public space failure in America, designed by the leading architects of the day, Harry Cobb and I.M. Pei: Boston City Hall Plaza. A public place so dismal that the winos don’t even want to go there. (Laughter) And we can’t fix it because I.M. Pei’s still alive, and every year Harvard and M.I.T. have a joint committee to repair it. And every year they fail to because they don’t want to hurt I.M. Pei’s feelings. This is the other side of the building. This was the winner of an international design award in, I think, 1966, something like that. It wasn’t Pei and Cobb, another firm designed this, but there’s not enough Prozac in the world to make people feel OK about going down this block. This is the back of Boston City Hall, the most important, you know, significant civic building in Albany — excuse me — in Boston. And what is the message that is coming, what are the vocabularies and grammars that are coming, from this building and how is it informing us about who we are? This, in fact, would be a better building if we put mosaic portraits of Josef Stalin, Pol Pot, Saddam Hussein, and all the other great despots of the 20th century on the side of the building, because then we’d honestly be saying what the building is really communicating to us. You know, that it’s a despotic building; it wants us to feel like termites. (Laughter) This is it on a smaller scale: the back of the civic center in my town, Saratoga Springs, New York. By the way, when I showed this slide to a group of Kiwanians in my town, they all rose in indignation from their creamed chicken, (Laughter) and they shouted at me and said, “It was raining that day when you took that picture!” Because this was perceived to be a weather problem. (Laughter) You know, this is a building designed like a DVD player. (Laughter) Audio jack, power supply — and look, you know these things are important architectural jobs for firms, right? You know, we hire firms to design these things. You can see exactly what went on, three o’clock in the morning at the design meeting. You know, eight hours before deadline, four architects trying to get this building in on time, right? And they’re sitting there at the long boardroom table with all the drawings, and the renderings, and all the Chinese food caskets are lying on the table, and — I mean, what was the conversation that was going on there? (Laughter) Because you know what the last word was, what the last sentence was of that meeting. It was: “Fuck it.” (Laughter) (Applause) That — that is the message of this form of architecture. The message is: We don’t give a fuck! We don’t give a fuck. So I went back on the nicest day of the year, just to — you know — do some reality testing, and in fact, he will not even go down there because (Laughter) it’s not interesting enough for his clients, you know, the burglars, the muggers. It’s not civically rich enough for them to go down there. OK. The pattern of Main Street USA — in fact, this pattern of building downtown blocks, all over the world, is fairly universal. It’s not that complicated: buildings more than one story high, built out to the sidewalk edge, so that people who are, you know, all kinds of people can get into the building. Other activities are allowed to occur upstairs, you know, apartments, offices, and so on. You make provision for this activity called shopping on the ground floor. They haven’t learned that in Monterey. If you go out to the corner right at the main intersection right in front of this conference center, you’ll see an intersection with four blank walls on every corner. It’s really incredible. Anyway, this is how you compose and assemble a downtown business building, and this is what happened when in Glens Falls, New York, when we tried to do it again, where it was missing, right? So the first thing they do is they pop up the retail a half a story above grade to make it sporty. OK. That completely destroys the relationship between the business and the sidewalk, where the theoretical pedestrians are. (Laughter) Of course, they’ll never be there, as long as this is in that condition. Then because the relationship between the retail is destroyed, we pop a handicapped ramp on that, and then to make ourselves feel better, we put a nature Band-Aid in front of it. And that’s how we do it. I call them “nature Band-Aids” because there’s a general idea in America that the remedy for mutilated urbanism is nature. And in fact, the remedy for wounded and mutilated urbanism is good urbanism, good buildings. Not just flower beds, not just cartoons of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. You know, that’s not good enough. We have to do good buildings. The street trees have really four jobs to do and that’s it: To spatially denote the pedestrian realm, to protect the pedestrians from the vehicles in the carriageway, to filter the sunlight onto the sidewalk, and to soften the hardscape of the buildings and to create a ceiling — a vaulted ceiling — over the street, at its best. And that’s it. Those are the four jobs of the street trees. They’re not supposed to be a cartoon of the North Woods; they’re not supposed to be a set for “The Last of the Mohicans.” You know, one of the problems with the fiasco of suburbia is that it destroyed our understanding of the distinction between the country and the town, between the urban and the rural. They’re not the same thing. And we’re not going to cure the problems of the urban by dragging the country into the city, which is what a lot of us are trying to do all the time. Here you see it on a small scale — the mothership has landed, R2-D2 and C-3PO have stepped out to test the bark mulch to see if they can inhabit this planet. (Laughter) A lot of this comes from the fact that the industrial city in America was such a trauma that we developed this tremendous aversion for the whole idea of the city, city life, and everything connected with it. And so what you see fairly early, in the mid-19th century, is this idea that we now have to have an antidote to the industrial city, which is going to be life in the country for everybody. And that starts to be delivered in the form of the railroad suburb: the country villa along the railroad line, which allows people to enjoy the amenity of the city, but to return to the countryside every night. And believe me, there were no Wal-Marts or convenience stores out there then, so it really was a form of country living. But what happens is, of course, it mutates over the next 80 years and it turns into something rather insidious. It becomes a cartoon of a country house, in a cartoon of the country. And that’s the great non-articulated agony of suburbia and one of the reasons that it lends itself to ridicule. Because it hasn’t delivered what it’s been promising for half a century now. And these are typically the kind of dwellings we find there, you know. Basically, a house with nothing on the side because this house wants to state, emphatically, “I’m a little cabin in the woods. There’s nothing on either side of me. I don’t have any eyes on the side of my head. I can’t see.” So you have this one last facade of the house, the front, which is really a cartoon of a facade of a house. Because — notice the porch here. Unless the people that live here are Munchkins, nobody’s going to be using that. This is really, in fact, a television broadcasting a show 24/7 called “We’re Normal.” We’re normal, we’re normal, we’re normal, we’re normal, we’re normal. Please respect us, we’re normal, we’re normal, we’re normal. But we know what’s going on in these houses, you know. We know that little Skippy is loading his Uzi down here, getting ready for homeroom. (Laughter) We know that Heather, his sister Heather, 14 years old, is turning tricks up here to support her drug habit. Because these places, these habitats, are inducing immense amounts of anxiety and depression in children, and they don’t have a lot of experience with medication. So they take the first one that comes along, often. These are not good enough for Americans. These are the schools we are sending them to: The Hannibal Lecter Central School, Las Vegas, Nevada. This is a real school! You know, but there’s obviously a notion that if you let the inmates of this thing out, that they would snatch a motorist off the street and eat his liver. So every effort is made to keep them within the building. Notice that nature is present. (Laughter) We’re going to have to change this behavior whether we like it or not. We are entering an epochal period of change in the world, and — certainly in America — the period that will be characterized by the end of the cheap oil era. It is going to change absolutely everything. Chris asked me not to go on too long about this, and I won’t, except to say there’s not going to be a hydrogen economy. Forget it. It’s not going to happen. We’re going to have to do something else instead. We’re going to have to down-scale, re-scale, and re-size virtually everything we do in this country and we can’t start soon enough to do it. We’re going to have — (Applause) — we’re going to have to live closer to where we work. We’re going to have to live closer to each other. We’re going have to grow more food closer to where we live. The age of the 3,000 mile Caesar salad is coming to an end. We’re going to have to — we have a railroad system that the Bulgarians would be ashamed of! We gotta do better than that! And we should have started two days before yesterday. We are fortunate that the new urbanists were there, for the last 10 years, excavating all that information that was thrown in the garbage by our parents’ generation after World War II. Because we’re going to need it if we’re going to learn how to reconstruct towns. We’re going to need to get back this body of methodology and principle and skill in order to re-learn how to compose meaningful places, places that are integral, that allow — that are living organisms in the sense that they contain all the organs of our civic life and our communal life, deployed in an integral fashion. So that, you know, the residences make sense deployed in relation to the places of business, of culture and of governance. We’re going to have to re-learn what the building blocks of these things are: the street, the block, how to compose public space that’s both large and small, the courtyard, the civic square and how to really make use of this property. We can see some of the first ideas for retro-fitting some of the catastrophic property that we have in America. The dead malls: what are we going to do with them? Well, in point of fact, most of them are not going to make it. They’re not going to be retro-fitted; they’re going to be the salvage yards of the future. Some of them we’re going to fix, though. And we’re going to fix them by imposing back on them street and block systems and returning to the building lot as the normal increment of development. And if we’re lucky, the result will be revivified town centers and neighborhood centers in our existing towns and cities. And by the way, our towns and cities are where they are, and grew where they were because they occupy all the important sites. And most of them are still going to be there, although the scale of them is probably going to be diminished. We’ve got a lot of work to do. We’re not going to be rescued by the hyper-car; we’re not going to be rescued by alternative fuels. No amount or combination of alternative fuels is going to allow us to continue running what we’re running, the way we’re running it. We’re going to have to do everything very differently. And America’s not prepared. We are sleepwalking into the future. We’re not ready for what’s coming at us. So I urge you all to do what you can. Life in the mid-21st century is going to be about living locally. Be prepared to be good neighbors. Be prepared to find vocations that make you useful to your neighbors and to your fellow citizens. One final thing — I’ve been very disturbed about this for years, but I think it’s particularly important for this audience. Please, please, stop referring to yourselves as “consumers.” OK? Consumers are different than citizens. Consumers do not have obligations, responsibilities and duties to their fellow human beings. And as long as you’re using that word consumer in the public discussion, you will be degrading the quality of the discussion we’re having. And we’re going to continue being clueless going into this very difficult future that we face. So thank you very much. Please go out and do what you can to make this a land full of places that are worth caring about and a nation that will be worth defending. (Applause)