Browsing Tag: and

    Lackawanna Cut-Off – Part 12: Freight Trains Over the Cut-Off
    Articles, Blog

    Lackawanna Cut-Off – Part 12: Freight Trains Over the Cut-Off

    August 21, 2019


    Hi. Welcome to Part 12 on the Lackawanna
    Cut-Off where we’ll going to be talking about freight trains over the Cut-Off.
    Hi, I’m Chuck Walsh and I’m president of the North Jersey Rail Commuter
    Association and we’re here on top of Garrett Mountain overlooking Paterson,
    New Jersey, and, in the far distance, New York. You’re probably wondering what
    we’re doing at Garrett Mountain. What does that have to do with the Lackawanna
    Cut-Off? It actually it has a lot to do with the Lackawanna Cut-Off. Now in the
    distance here you can see Route 80, which is the main highway in northern New
    Jersey, runs from just west of the George Washington Bridge all the way to the
    Oakland Bay Bridge in San Francisco. From here below us is Route 19. Now you’re
    wondering why I’m getting into talking about highways for. Well, Route 19 and
    Route 80, following this particular alignment, was the Boonton Line, or in the
    days and it was built the Boonton Branch, of the Lackawanna Railroad, over which all freight from Hoboken,
    Secaucus, you know the east and the Lackawanna, went west to Port Morris and
    over the Cut-Off. Now the Boonton Branch was built 1869,
    1870, and was a bypass to the Morristown Line. And in this segment we’re going to
    visit Denville; we’ll show you the relationship there of the Morristown Line
    and the Boonton Branch. But the Boonton Branch was essentially a cutoff, the
    cutoff between the west side of the Bergen tunnels, just outside of Hoboken,
    and Denville. And for almost a hundred years was the main freight line in
    northern New Jersey for the Lackawanna. Now when the Cut-Off was built trains
    had been running over the Boonton Branch, back and forth, for over 40 years.
    It was a low grade line, had very few grade crossings, and went through this–it
    wasn’t called a notch per se but it was a gap between Garrett Mountain and
    Gothel Hill, which is north, but basically parallel–this is the Watchung range in
    New Jersey, and there are actually a series of gaps that railroads have taken
    advantage of the different gaps in the Watchung Range. You have the next one
    down, which is Great Notch, which the Erie used for its Greenwood Lake Branch.
    We’ll talk a little bit more about that when we get to Mountain View which will
    be essentially our next stop. And the Morristown Line itself actually use the
    gap between Millburn, Springfield, Summit, up in
    that neck of the woods. But this was really a key place for the railroad to
    go through. In fact it actually took advantage of another gap west of here. So
    when the the builders of the Boonton Branch were contemplating this
    particular line they knew that this was one place they needed to go through. Now
    how does this all impact the Cut-Off? Well, yes, it was the freight line for
    a number of years that trains over the Cut-Off would come east and would go
    through here, through Patterson, around this sweeping curve through the gap over
    here and westbound the same way. Fast forward to the early 60s–and this is
    after the merger between the Erie and the Lackawanna creating the Erie
    Lackawanna Railroad–and remember we talked about this in Rails Under and Over the
    Cut-Off, that segment, where in 1960 when there was the merger that the management,
    which was primarily Erie people, who took over the Erie Lackawanna, who became part
    of the Erie Lackawanna management– shifted virtually all freight traffic
    from here up via the Erie, which actually would go in this trajectory in that way
    out, way to the east of where we are here for the most part. By 1963, the Erie Lackawanna in the
    previous two years had lost 43 million dollars; they would lose another 15 or 20
    in 1963. But in 1963 there was an opportunity presented to them where they
    could make money by selling off this section of the Boonton Branch to the New
    Jersey Highway Department. The New Jersey Highway Department would later become the
    Department of Transportation, the New Jersey DOT. But in those days they were
    the highway department. Now the highway department really, really, really, wanted
    to have this access to this gap here. As you can see this is Route 80, that
    Route 80 goes right through here. However, the Lackawanna, or at
    that point the Erie Lackawanna, had two tracks that went through that gap. In
    fact I’ve had a couple of conversations with my friend John Willever who
    worked for the Lackawanna and then got a job with the highway department in,
    like, 1956, 1957, and actually was part of the team that was tasked with condemning
    land to create Route 80. And he told me the story that the then-Commissioner of
    the, or whatever the head of the highway department was called in those days, came
    to the right-of-way team, or division, and said that–and they had been condemning
    land adjacent to the Boonton Branch, in other words, they were not at that point
    contemplating taking the right-of-way of the Boonton Branch, as
    would eventually happen–but the Commissioner had come up with a
    brilliant idea that, well, why don’t we see if the Erie Lackawanna might be
    willing to set sell part of the right-of-way.
    And at that point, as I mentioned, the Erie Lackawanna is in the red and in
    desperate straits as far as cash is concerned. So what happens is that the
    highway department approaches the Erie Lackawanna and offers money to
    buy the right-of-way, and because at that point in time the Erie Lackawanna
    had shifted all freight traffic away from the Boonton Branch they figured, oh, we
    don’t really need this and we can make a bunch of money–actually it would turn out
    to be like two million dollars–but we’re talking now fifty-five years ago, so two
    million dollars was quite a bit of money in those days, and what would have at
    least helped somewhat toward the bottom line. However, the decision was going to
    come back to haunt the Erie Lackawanna big-time and come back though the haunt
    the Cut-Off, as a matter of fact, as well. But, in any case, to finish the story
    with John Willever, what happened was that the highway department
    worked out a deal where the Erie Lackawanna could keep one track. Now this
    is where the story gets a little muddy, and then I’m going to give my opinion on
    what actually happened here. The Erie Lackawanna eventually ended up selling
    the entire right-of-way; in other words, Route 80, there are no tracks anywhere but
    we’ll actually show you, or at least we’ll try to show you, along the section
    of where there were tracks. But the Erie Lackawanna basically was willing to dump
    this right-of-way to get their two million dollars. But the highway
    department really didn’t expect that was going to happen. Now the story that has always
    been told publicly has been that the highway
    department was only willing to give the E-L–the Erie Lackawanna–money in the
    event that they sold the entire right-of-way
    and didn’t keep any tracks. But that can’t be possibly true, and here’s why. In
    eminent domain, which is another word for condemnation, in eminent domain the condemning
    party–in this case it would be the state, the State of New Jersey, the highway
    department–is obligated to pay the landowner, in this case the Erie
    Lackawanna, fair market value for whatever they take, be it land, could be a
    right-of-way, could be buildings, whatever the case may be. So to say that they
    would leave room for one track–in other words, they take
    right-of-way and only leave one track behind–means that they would have taken–
    and this section is several miles, as a matter of fact, I’m going to guess
    three four miles of right-of-way–they would have to pay the Erie Lackawanna,
    they be obligated legally to pay the Erie Lackawanna, for what they took,
    irrespective of what it took to somehow get one track to go through this section,
    with highway ramps that were going to be built and the highways themselves, and so
    forth. So basically the story that somehow that the Erie Lackawanna wasn’t
    going to get any money for leaving one track behind is nonsense, absolute
    nonsense. It cannot be. It’s legally impossible. My opinion what
    happened was that the Erie Lackawanna made up that story to justify them
    dumping the whole section of track and selling it off to the State of New
    Jersey. I think that’s what happened. And the story that’s been told over the
    years and it’s been repeated–it’s in Thomas Taber’s book, I’ve seen in other books as
    well–is, in my view, untrue; it’s false; a lie if you wish. Basically that’s what it
    is. Now, how does this affect the Cut-Off? Well, in 1963, October of 1963, the last
    trains come through here and they start tearing up the track and the
    right-of-way and planning for the highway, and so forth. Now what happens is
    that there’s several different changes that are made to the traffic patterns
    for the Erie Lackawanna. Now the first one is, of course, well, this is no longer
    in operation, the Boonton Branch, or the Boonton Line as it would become. And in
    the distance, you can’t really make it out per se, but there’s what is now
    called the Main Line for New Jersey Transit, runs through here and actually
    connects into what is remaining of the Boonton Branch east,
    timetable east–really south–of here in this direction. West of where the line
    was severed a spur was left in, what they call the Totowa Industrial Spur, all the
    way to Mountain View, which will be our next stop. At Mountain View, the Boonton
    Branch crossed at right angles with the Greenwood Lake Branch of the Erie, the
    former Erie as I mentioned. The Greenwood Lake would now become the Boonton Line
    and would shift over, which we’ll show you, on to what was originally the Boonton
    Branch at Mountain View. We’ll have maps to show you–this is a little bit
    confusing–but essentially what happens and what part of the justification for
    this particular change, if we will, of operating patterns for the Erie
    Lackawanna, was, oh, the City of Paterson still has train service; the
    line going up through Great Notch and Mountain View still runs; and the rest of
    the Boonton Line will still have passenger service west of Mountain View.
    However, what was lost was a high grade, or high speed, freight line between these
    points. To use an analogy the Greenwood Lake Branch was similar to
    basically the Old Road when you compare this to, let’s say, the Cut-Off; that was the
    difference, and an added difference was that not only was it like the Old Road to the
    Cut-Off–the Greenwood Lake to the Boonton Branch–but there was also heavy
    commuter action that was taking place every day on the Greenwood Lake Branch.
    So, as a result, freight trains would have to somehow weave in and out, if you
    will, between heavy commuter operations. So that’s where things stood through the
    60s and into the early seventies we talked about in, once again, Rails Under
    and Over the Cut-Off about the Erie Side and all the traffic being moved over
    there. Well, guess what? It didn’t exactly work out that was the best plan in the
    long run. The so-called New England Gateway dries up; the Penn-Central
    merger causes a change in freight patterns, which means basically the whole
    justification for using the Erie Side now no longer exists. So we get into the
    early- and mid-70s, the Erie Lackawanna is now forced to move all its freight
    traffic back on to the Boonton Line–not the Boonton Branch because the Boonton Branch is gone–
    the Boonton Line, and now have to run trains basically on a heavily-used
    commuter line, with a heavy grade going in and out of Great Notch, which is
    basically going through the same Watchung Mountains, only it’s
    much more of a heavy grade going up. This is a much better gap. That’s why the
    Lackawanna chose this gap to go through, not where the Greenwood Lake went
    through it at Great Notch. So, as we go through the 70s
    the Erie Lackawanna is basically stuck now with this line, which if
    they had not abandoned the Boonton Branch they wouldn’t have to have that problem.
    Now how does this affect the Cut-Off? Well it affects it big time, because after Conrail
    takes over–in other words, the Erie Lackawanna and six other railroads in
    the Northeast are conveyed into Conrail as of April 1, 1976–this line now, well
    it’s not even this line but the line that the Greenwood Lake Branch-Boonton Line as it was called, now becomes basically an albatross and Conrail
    sticks with it for about basically two years more or less–maybe a little more,
    two and a half years–and then shuts down the operation using this–at least that’s what they said, whether it was true or not, if you want to believe them or not–but Conrail said the
    main reason why they abandoned this entire route for the Erie Lackawanna, including
    the Cut-Off, was because of this, the Boonton Branch, which was removed. So, that short-sighted move back in 1963 would come back to haunt the
    Erie Lackawanna, and the Cut-Off, big-time. That’s why we came to Garrett Mountain, to
    discuss the implications of a move that took place now fifty-five years ago and
    caused the abandonment of–well, it didn’t cause the abandonment of passenger service –freight-wise it did, but there
    was still passenger traffic on the line, so that the State of New Jersey ended up,
    ironically, taking over most of the operation. But at that point the Cut-Off–
    and now we’re talking 1979–was only a freight route at that point and as we’ll
    get into in subsequent segments we’ll talk about the effort to try to bring
    back the Cut-Off using passenger service, maybe talking about freight service at
    that time, but this long predates the current effort which, you know, in the
    modern time, 2017, but we’ll talk about all that history. There’s still a lot to
    talk about the Cut-Off that we haven’t even gotten into, we haven’t really even touched
    for that matter. But a lot of it comes back to here:
    Garrett Mountain, Route 80, Route 19 that took over the right-of-way
    and basically changed the freight operation on the former Lackawanna line
    forever. There’s no way to bring this back. And you maybe you could think about
    a hundred years, or who knows how many years at some point, highways will be now
    abandoned in favor of rail lines. That could happen but that’s not
    something I’d bet on happening anytime soon, of course. But in the long-term
    maybe that will happen but in the short-term, impossible, basically. So, that’s the
    story behind Garrett Mountain and the Lackawanna and the
    Boonton Branch. So, we’re going to take a trip now to our next stop, which
    is Mountain View, and we’ll point out the relationship between the Boonton Branch,
    the Greenwood Lake, and the Boonton Line, and what is now called the Montclair-Boonton
    Line. So…here we are at Mountain View.
    Now, as I mentioned, when we were back at Garrett Mountain, the Boonton Line–this
    is the Boonton Line, or the Boonton Branch–this is looking east towards
    Garrett Mountain, Paterson, Hoboken, New York. And west is that way, towards…and I’m going to actually walk around… the Morris Canal ran, I believe, right over in
    here, as a matter of fact. This is the station
    area. Where the actual crossing with the Erie, or the Greenwood Lake
    Branch of the Erie, is up the track apiece. We’re going to visit there next
    just to give you some perspective. So as of October of 1963, freight trains stopped
    going through here, through freights. Local service still actually exists.
    You can see that the tracks are still shiny. The tracks do go several
    miles as far as Totowa, in that neck of the woods,
    and then basically used to dead-end, actually almost literally next to Route
    80 where it almost seemed like the tracks are going to go right on to the
    highway right-of-way, but I believe most of those tracks now have been removed.
    That’s a number of years ago. In any case… we’ll give you some perspective of what
    happened here, but this used to be two tracks. Originally the plan was to
    have four tracks here but that was never done. The station here was, like, 1903, was
    an early station, was here, and certainly would have been discontinued as of 1963
    at the very latest because of the cessation of all through traffic, because this was a passenger route as well. We’ve talked about freight,
    but passenger service used this as well and which would shift over to the
    Greenwood Lake Branch. So, the Greenwood Lake Branch is our next stop. The crossing, as
    it were– it doesn’t look like it did at one time–but where the two lines crossed each at grade. Here we are at Mountain View, and we’re
    going to show you what the track arrangement is now. At one time the Boonton
    Branch came across through here and continued on. As you can see, we have a New
    Jersey Transit train coming up the tracks behind me…I’m not going to try to
    compete with him. Now what’s happening is that he is now going on to the last
    piece of the Greenwood Lake Branch, and now is entering what became a
    connector. And probably by the time I finish the
    next sentence that train will be on the original Boonton Line, where it
    continues on from Mountain View. Now, that train just stopped at the Mountain
    View station, former Erie station, Erie Lackawanna. As of 1963, all trains shifted,
    went back and forth, shall we say, freights and passenger trains along this section
    of line. Now the section here that I’m standing on is essentially a wye track,
    for all intents and purposes. It comes off of the branch, continues
    up here. Now this is the original Greenwood Lake Branch I’m standing on. [Train whistle in distance] Now I’m facing north.
    This continued on to, well, Greenwood Lake. That’s why they call it the Greenwood Lake
    Branch. Now you can see another track which comes back and goes in that
    direction; that’s the connector to the Boonton
    Branch, what’s left of it east of here. This is west of Mountain View and New Jersey
    Transit goes back and forth this way. Now the question about the combining of
    routes; that occurred in 1963. There’s also been a further combining that’s
    taken place for, well, since the Lackawanna where, I should say the
    Morris and Essex, had a Boonton–I correct myself–a Montclair Branch, which went to
    Montclair. In 2002, more or less 80 years after it was
    first suggested as a connection, a connection was made from the Greenwood
    Lake Branch, which connected into the Montclair Branch of the old
    Lackawanna, creating what is now the Montclair-Boonton Line. So what happens
    is that the trains that, let’s say, we’re going in this direction–
    eastbound–when they get to Montclair, they switch off of what is the
    Greenwood Lake on to a connector track called the Montclair Connection, and then
    go on to the Montclair Branch what used to be the Lackawanna, or now is
    the Morris & Essex of Lines of New Jersey Transit, then goes into Newark-Broad Street and then into Hoboken, or could possible go into New York from
    there as well. So that traffic pattern has changed. What’s significant about that is,
    because we’ve been talked about, well, what happens if you reactivate the
    Cut-Off? Would there be long freights that could possibly go over the Cut-Off? Well, the
    question is where would they come from? There’s no place…the Boonton Branch is
    gone; this is impossible, this line dead- ends a few miles from here, as we’ve seen.
    And in this direction, the Greenwood Lake Branch was bad enough when it
    was being operated by the Erie Lackawanna, as a last resort, with heavy
    commuter operations. But since the shifting of the connection at Montclair
    so that the line now goes down the electrified Montclair Branch–that means
    there’s overhead wires, catenary that are energized–
    and the original Greenwood Lake, which went to Croxton Yard which was where the
    Erie Lackawanna ran its freights out of… You can’t get there anymore.
    So as a result, this line in terms of any kind of freight usage, maybe a little bit
    of local freight, yes. This is a freight spur; there is some local freight, but
    that’s it. The days of the long freights of hundred-plus car trains are long over.
    They will never see that here again. It’s just not possible.
    So, in any case, that is Mountain View. So our next stop– the far end if you will of
    the Boonton Branch where it connects with the Morristown Line and that’s at Denville
    Junction. Here we are at Denville Junction. As a Morristown Line train is about to leave. So that train is either headed for Dover
    or Netcong, or maybe even Hackettstown as its last stop. This is the Morristown Line,
    and on this side is the western end of the Boonton Line, what is now the
    Montclair-Boonton Line, and at one time was called the Boonton Branch. Now trains
    off of the Boonton Line will go basically on to what is the Morristown Line.
    They’re combined west of here. Now the setup here has actually changed dramatically
    over the years. Originally, and when the Boonton Branch was built, it actually came
    straight through, as it does now, but the Morristown Line, actually–and I will go
    and turn around here–actually came through where this parking lot is and
    crossed–and actually didn’t even connect in–it crossed through, went up around
    to Rockaway and came back in at what they called East Dover, and that was where
    the connection back into the Morristown Line was made. So this was at one time, in freight times, was a real busy place. It was, I’ll say, enormously complicated; you still had
    the two tracks here, but you had four tracks going west of here. There are only
    two tracks now, but there were two electrified tracks–I’m going to turn
    around again–you can see that the catenary here and maybe do just a quick
    explanation what catenary is. The catenary are these overhead wires that
    deliver electricity to trains. Now the train that just left was a
    diesel-powered train so that wasn’t a train that requires overhead catenary.
    But the catenary continues on the two tracks to the left and then there were
    two to the right. And now we got a
    Boonton Line train coming, so now we’re going to go around the other way again. Now if we get a view of the catenary, or
    I should say the pantograph, up on top of here,
    up on top of the engine. That’s been pulled down because the Boonton Line is not
    electrified, at least the western portion of the Boonton Line is not electrified. Part
    of it is all the way to Montclair State University is and then the rest of the
    line is not electrified. So, therefore, they pull the pantograph, which is the
    thingy that touches the wire, 25,000 volts of alternating current. When I
    said this is a busy spot, I meant it. Here comes now an eastbound train while
    the westbound train leaves. Now this is busy now, can you imagine back
    in the day with freight trains coming through here; it was a railfan’s
    delight to be here. Now this eastbound train…these are
    Arrow multiple–no they’re not; this is a regular old push-pull type of deal. And these are running under diesel as well.
    So he does not have the pantograph up. So, anyway, unfortunately we can’t show you a
    train with a pantograph because one of the issues with running trains–freight
    trains–east of here, talking about the Morristown Line, which has been done in
    the past, but only under basically emergency conditions. You have the
    overhead catenary which restricts the height of any train, not so much here, but
    much further east of here is a problem at Roseville Avenue–not Roseville Tunnel–
    Roseville Avenue, which is near Newark. That’s actually a Metro-North locomotive
    that’s pushing that train. But to complete the thought about the
    overhead catenary at Roseville Avenue in Newark, it restricts the height of
    everything basically. Actually the train cars–we haven’t seen any of the
    double-deckers yet–but the double deckers, which would be the tallest cars
    that New Jersey Transit would have, because you have two decks: you seats down here and
    seats up here. The height of those was actually restricted so that
    they could run under the wires, or the catenary, at Roseville Avenue, which is
    under 16 feet, so that really restricts the height of the cars and the
    locomotives, of course, as well because you need some space. Otherwise you’d have
    25,000 volts arcing between the train and the wire. So, in any case, this is
    Denville, a real hot spot we can say as we just proven. The last couple minutes
    we’ve seen three different trains. Our next stop, we’re finally getting back to
    the Cut-Off because I know we’ve been talking about the Cut-Off. And the
    whole reason for giving a view of the eastern part of the line is to talk
    about the interaction of freight with the line. The Cut-Off was built to such a
    high specification, it’s not the issue. It’s the lines east, and also
    west. We haven’t really talked too much about the west of the Cut-Off with the
    Pocono Mountains; that was an issue as well, which we’ll get into other in
    future episodes. But at least for now to give you an idea, one of the major issues
    with trains east of Port Morris, which we’ve gone through with Garrett Mountain. Freight train specifically, not so much passenger, although passenger has
    been indirectly affected by that particular change in operating
    alignment, where basically the railroad goes.
    So, onward to Port Morris, and hopefully the weather will be better there. If not,
    then at some point we will definitely continue on at Port
    Morris. Here we are at Port Morris Yard, Port
    Morris Wye. The weather has cleared up, fortunately. If we look at the Cut-Off,
    which is just on the other end of the yard going in this direction. To orient
    you, this is towards Lake Hopatcong station; the Cut-Off; in that direction is
    Netcong; and this is all of the yard, part of which is being used by New
    Jersey Transit for various purposes. As you can see there are lots of railroad
    ties and various kinds of junk, I guess you could say. This is Port Morris Wye,
    which is the connection between the Cut-Off, which is back there, and the yard itself,
    of course. Now, this wye was opened at the same time that the Cut-Off was built, opened
    in 1911, and was the conduit for trains coming in and off of the Cut-Off that
    we’re going to come into the yard here. For example, in 1913 the Lackawanna
    experimented with an incredibly long train for that time, a 132-car coal train,
    which they ran from Slateford to Port Morris. It would have come in here
    because this was a distribution point, and that train barely made it: it had
    three locomotives on front and two pushers; the train had to stop
    several times because several couplers broke under all
    that weight. I think with 8,000 tons, which is a large train, and that was an
    experiment that Lackawanna would never repeat. They learned that that was just
    too big of a train, at least for the technology, the couplers just couldn’t
    withstand that kind of torque, that kind of weight that was being
    applied onto them. Over the years this yard served certainly various
    purposes, but one of its main uses–and this would even I guess predate the
    Cut-Off, because this yard goes back into the 1880s, 1870s–was what they called
    less than carload freight, LCL as they called it. And what that means is that
    when various items were being shipped they would be grouped together with
    other shippers or receivers that were going to get that particular freight. So
    if you were shipping a any kind of, let’s say an appliance of some sort–of course
    in those days there wouldn’t be that many appliances, maybe a washer, it’s
    possible a clothes washer, although they looked quite a bit different than those
    days–but that transfer would have taken place up at Port Morris. There was an
    area, the LCL area, in Port Morris up until about 1931, which interestingly
    enough coincides roughly with the time of the closure of Roseville Siding just
    west of here, a couple miles west of here. It also coincides with the beginning of
    the depression, the Great Depression of the 1930s, so it may or may not, the siding
    closing, may not necessarily be directly related to the closing of LCL,
    although LCL may be directly related to the
    depression era. This yard would last until 1960, until the time of the merger,
    after which it would be closed. The reason why Port Morris closed was because,
    as I mentioned earlier in this video when we were at Garret Mountain, the Erie
    Lackawanna, which took over in October 1960, the Erie Lackawanna management
    shifted basically all freight off onto the former Erie side or the Erie
    mainline, which is now today’s Bergen County Line under New Jersey Transit. So
    that, for example, the Lehigh and Hudson River, which we talked about in Rails
    Under and Over the Cut-Off, which ran via the Sussex Branch into here, the Sussex
    Branch would have come in at the far end of, well it would have come in at
    Netcong but it would have connected in through Netcong at the far end of the
    the yard here in Port Morris. That also ceased after 1960 because the whole
    pattern of freight movement for the Erie Lackawanna changed from that of what was
    previously done under the Lackawanna days. So everything was moved up there;
    when I say up “there”, meaning north to Maybrook where that interchange took
    place and such that all of the main traffic up until when we start getting
    into the mid 70s when it will shift back. But up until that time, from the period
    between 1960-61, and to the time of the the great shifting back of everything to
    the Lackawanna side, everything here is basically shut down. There’s nothing
    really much of anything going on. Don’t know that the Erie
    Lackawanna actually had any plans to do anything with Port Morris. There were proposals,
    as a matter of fact, and this went even later in the time, even into the Conrail years
    past 1976, there was talk of using this particular facility as an inter-modal type of facility. In other words, the trailers would come in, basically
    truck trailers come in, and they would be transferred and pulled out by the
    tractor–the tractor trailer–and because of the close proximity of Route 80, Route
    46, Route 206, trains could have been brought into here, let’s say from
    the west, and they wouldn’t have to go all the way into, basically, the far
    eastern part of the state and then have to be brought back out. They would be out
    here and wouldn’t necessarily have to deal with as much traffic. It would’ve saved time,
    and so forth. It was never implemented. It was a great idea but it it never got any
    traction, unfortunately, and then in a couple years New Jersey Transit became
    involved and they didn’t do anything with this particular property for quite
    some time, as a matter of fact. They had their bridge department here
    for a number of years, this going into the 80s and into the 90s, as a matter of fact,
    and then they put in their own yard, which stores train sets for the
    Boonton Line, or what became later the Montclair-Boonton Line, which we just came
    from at Denville. So, basically when trains, and this was talking once
    again going back to the pre-1960 days, trains would have been coming
    back and forth through here. This would have been probably one of the most
    heavily-used pieces of track on the entire Lackawanna system, this wye track.
    Because trains leaving going westbound and trains leaving or coming
    in eastbound into this yard–not all of them would go in and out; a lot of them
    would bypass and go on to the Cut-Off–but a lot of them would come in and
    out of here, and so this this wye got quite a bit of use,
    as a matter of fact, but all that changed once the Erie Lackawanna took
    over. And that, as we’ve talked about had a dramatic effect, and then when you also
    talk about the severing of the Boonton Line in Paterson, the closure of Port
    Morris. So you see that there was a pattern here. And of course what caused all this was the shifting of the traffic to the Erie
    side, thinking that money was going to be saved, that basically over the
    long-term operating over the Erie side can be argued, maybe, was the best way of
    running the railroad. It would not stay that way. And as we talked about when–
    we’re talking about now going back to ’74- ’75 when things are shifted back to the
    Lackawanna side–it becomes very evident that the mistakes of the past have come
    back to haunt. Not only Garrett Mountain but the single-tracking of the
    Cut-Off; the single tracking of parts of the Boonton Line, as a matter of fact, as well.
    Just a lot of changes that if there had been a little bit of foresight would
    have possibly allowed Conrail to continue operation of this line past the
    time where it decided that was just going to get rid of it.
    Now there are complications, and what I guess we can get into this another time
    because we will cover this era in greater detail, but just to give you a
    little glimpse of what we could talk about when we get to Conrail and the
    abandonment of the Cut-Off…that Conrail had a heavy influence by, of course,
    the Pennsylvania and the New York Central, was Penn-Central at that point,
    but historically they were basically
    the reason for Conrail being formed and a lot of other railroads got pulled into
    that mix, and the Erie Lackawanna got pulled in very
    late, as a matter of fact; they weren’t originally intended to be part of
    Conrail, what became the Conrail merger. But the predecessor railroads
    in Conrail also had other railroads that they had financial interest in. Like the
    Pennsylvania, for example, had great interest in the Lehigh Valley Railroad.
    Which interestingly, maybe not coincidentally, after the abandonment
    of the Cut-Off, the Lehigh Valley– while it already had become
    one of the main routes–well you can think well there’s an economic interest
    that was together with that… MAN WITH CHAIR: I’m sorta getting your money. CHUCK: Hi. MAN WITH CHAIR: Hi. You don’t have to pay me. CHUCK: Well, that was interesting.
    Not sure where he’s headed. So in any case, with Conrail we see that
    what became Conrail was made of predecessor roads that actually had ties
    to the main railroads, meaning the Pennsylvania and New York Central. We can
    also talk about some of the influences that the New York Central had on the
    Lackawanna, and that that would be another discussion entirely. So, in any
    case, that’s a little bit of an overview of Port Morris, its relationship to the wye
    here, its relationship to the Cut-Off. Our next
    stop, and our last stop, is going to be at Roseville Road. We’re going to take a
    look, which we’ll discuss a little bit more freight, and we’ll also talk about
    the new bridge that’s there. Here we are at Roseville Road overpass, which you
    can see is under construction, but it is nearing the end of construction, should
    be completed as I speak within the next six weeks about. That’s what they’re
    saying. And then the work on the approaches and all that stuff and this
    particular roadway, which has been closed now for over a year now, should then
    hopefully reopen shortly thereafter. Now, one of the reasons why we’re here is
    to talk about, of course, we’re talking about freight, but this is an
    interesting location in terms of a freight accident, which occurred on
    September 17th, 1929. An eastbound freight was coming up the grade and was catching
    up to another freight which was ahead of it. The engineer in the second freight–
    and this is from an ICC (Interstate Commerce Commission) report, in those days they’re the ones who would investigate accidents–from that report,
    the engineer of the second freight train was doing somewhere in the neighborhood
    of about 25 miles an hour when he hit the rear end of the leading freight that
    was doing 11 miles an hour just on the other side of Roseville Tunnel, which at
    this point is less than a half a mile away from here. What’s interesting, though–
    a couple of things are interesting about that particular accident. First of all, it’s
    the only accident where there really seems to have been any negligence on
    part of any person, in this case the engineer, of any accident in any way
    related to the Cut-Off. There was a derailment in 1960 in Greendell,
    probably attributable to track conditions, or a switch or something, but in
    this case there was negligence on the part of the engineer. He passed a
    restricting signal; in other words, a yellow signal. He passed a red signal. He
    went over two torpedoes, which are basically explosive devices which you’d
    have to be basically dead in order to miss. And then went through the tunnel
    and then hit the leading train. There was a derailment. Fortunately, nobody was killed;
    four people were injured. But what’s significant–and then this wasn’t this
    bridge because this is a replacement bridge and is taller than the original
    bridge, although the alignment is very similar to the original bridge–what’s
    interesting is that there was a signal that was between this bridge and
    Roseville Tunnel. In 1929 it would have been a semaphore signal, and according to
    the ICC report they discovered that that particular signal would have been
    partially obscured by this bridge when it was in the down position, or maybe the
    up position… in any position apparently. That didn’t
    really factor into the actual accident itself, we don’t think. I mean the
    engineer should have seen the restricting signal; he should have seen
    the red signal, even though he might not have seen it
    initially, he had more than enough time to stop.
    He claims–and this was 6:31 in the morning when he hits the lead train from
    behind–he claims in the report that he was
    having lunch. Six-thirty-one in the morning; that sounds rather suspicious. But how on earth did he miss the torpedoes, which are like
    M-80s going off? Something was not right with that. But anyway this
    accident occurred here, probably tied up the Cut-Off for the day, or at least part
    of the day until he cleaned up the mess, and went on from there. Now in terms
    of talking about Roseville Tunnel, there really were no major operational issues
    with the tunnel per se, and we’ll divide the use of the tunnel from 1911
    up until, let’s say, the early- to mid- 70s to the Erie Lackawanna days. In the early days, or up until 1958 where there were two tracks. After 1958 we have
    a single track, which would have been the eastbound main here; the westbound main
    would have been over here. In the mid 70s they actually upgrade the Cut-Off,
    that’s the Erie Lackawanna, and they move the track, what was on the
    eastbound side, they move to basically the center of the tunnel to give greater
    clearance. Now the thing about freight trains on the Cut-Off you probably want
    me to mention something about, oh, HB-1 or HB-2, which would be Hoboken-Buffalo
    freights, the symbol freights going back or ES-98 and -99
    which were the Elizabethport–and I have a bug unfortunately flying around–
    Elizabethport to Scranton run which was a joint run after the Central Railroad of
    New Jersey gave up its operation in Pennsylvania and operated trains back
    and forth between Elizabethport on the CNJ–the Central Railroad in New Jersey–
    over the High Bridge Branch, up through Port Morris, and down the Cut-Off and up and
    over the Poconos to Scranton. I’m not going to get into a great detail about
    all the trains, to all the freight trains that ran on this line. You have to realize
    though that if you go from the time of, let’s say, the opening the Cut-Off that
    the number of freight trains was actually quite large: 40-45 freights a day
    was not unusual. As the freights, as the freight cars get larger the number of
    freights actually decreases. So we go into like the 30s and 40s you’re talking
    about maybe 20-25. At the time of the ’29 accident it was like upwards of like 50
    trains a day. But that was both passenger and and freight combined. But as you go
    into the 60s and 70s, while we know what happened in the 60s and 70s, at
    least early 60s and into the early 70s, there was basically no freight for all
    intents and purposes on this line. And then later on though the freights that
    were originally being run on the Erie Side moved over here and then Conrail
    continues to run freights, but only through the end of 1978 and after that
    they shut down the line, so there’s no activity at all. Of course, passenger had
    already ended in 1970, so there was no– except of an occasional special–there
    was no passenger operation taking place on the Cut-Off after 1970.
    So that’s a broad high-level view of freight activity on the Cut-Off. So, that
    basically ends this episode. I’m not going to give away what our next episode is,
    but maybe you can kind of guess. But I’ll leave it to you to keep that in your
    mind in terms of our episode 13, part 13. But I hope you in the meantime that you have enjoyed part 12 on the Lackawanna Cut-Off. Until next time, we’ll see you then.
    Look forward to part 13 on the Lackawanna Cut-Off.

    Articles

    Pedestrian standing on railroad tracks killed by train

    August 21, 2019


    – Internal Affairs, okay?
    They investigate dirty cops. – For what?
    – The pen cap! – What do you want?
    – Her. – Whatever you need to kno4,
    but he has to stay out of it. – Do Sara and Harry have
    grandparents? – What do you mean? – When you and [email protected] husband
    go away. – I did every single thing
    you asked. – And still, I got nothing. – Can you meet me right [email protected] [“Freedom! ’90”
    by George Michael][email protected] ♪ ♪ – ♪ I won’t let you down ♪

    Concerns being raised over railroad crossing safety after deadly train crash in Virginia
    Articles, Blog

    Concerns being raised over railroad crossing safety after deadly train crash in Virginia

    August 21, 2019


    FRIDAY WITH A COATING-2″ ASHLEY: ONE PERSON WAS KILLED WHEN AN AMTRAK TRAIN HIT A TRUCK AT A RAILROAD CROSSING IN VIRGINIA WEDNESDAY. 22NEWS REPORTER MIKE MASCIADRELLI JOINS US FROM OUR FRANKLIN COUNTY BUREAU WITH WAYS TO STAY SAFE AT RAILROAD CROSSINGS. MIKE MASCIADRELLI: AMTRAK SAYS THESE RAIL CROSSING ACCIDENTS ARE HAPPENING TO OFTEN, AND THEY’RE WORKING TO REDUCE THE FREQUENCY OF THESE ACCIDENTS. EVERY 3 HOURS, A VEHICLE IS HIT BY A TRAIN. THAT’S WHAT HAPPENED IN CROZET VIRGINIA WEDNESDAY WHEN AN AMTRAK TRAIN HIT A GARBAGE TRUCK AT A CROSSING, KILLING ONE PERSON. THE TRAIN WAS CARRYING HOUSE AND SENATE REPUBLICANS ON THEIR WAY TO WEST VIRGINIA. PAUL VIVIER: GREENFIELD EVERYBODY IS IN A BIG HURRY TODAY ANYWAYS AND THE GUY WAS PROBABLY ON HIS CELL PHONE WHO THE HECK KNOWS. THAT’S WHAT I’VE BEEN SEEING A LOT LATELY. MIKE MASCIADRELLI: WORKING FOR YOU THIS IS THE RAILROAD CROSSING ON ELM STREET IN DEERFIELD. THE STATE UPGRADED THE TECHNOLOGY THAT ACTIVITES THE GATES AND LIGHTS THAT LET YOU KNOW WHEN A TRAIN IS PASSING THROUGH, A COUPLE YEARS AGO. THEY DID THIS HERE AND AT THE RAILRAOD CROSSING IN WHATELY. AMTRAK’S VERMONTER RUNS THROUGH THE DEERFIELD AND WHATELY RAILROAD CROSSINGS TWICE EVERY AFTERNOON. THERE HAVE BEEN NO ACCIDENTS AT THESE CROSSINGS RECENTLY, BUT THERE WERE SOME CLOSE CALLS WITH FREIGHT TRAINS IN THE PAST. KEITH BARDWELL: SUPERINTENDENT, WHATELY HIGHWAY DEPT IT WAS GOING SO SLOW THEY WOULD CUT THROUGH THERE. IT WAS FREQUENT, IT HAPPENED ALL THE TIME. BUT NOT REALLY ANYMORE SINCE THEY IMPLEMENTED THE NEW CROSSING. AMTRAK IS REMINDING DRIVERS TO NEVER DRIVE AROUND LOWERED GATES AT A CROSSING. IT’S BOTH DANGEROUS AND ILLEGAL. IF YOUR CAR STALLS ON THE TRACKS, GET OUT, AND GET AWAY FROM IT, AND FIND THE BLUE EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM, AND CALL FOR HELP. MIKE MASCIADRELLI: AMTRAK IS WORKING WITH THE NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD TO INVESTIGATE THE DEADLY TRAIN CRASH IN VIRGINIA. REPORTING FROM THE FC BUREAU, IN GREENFIELD, MIKE MASCIADRELLI,

    FROM DEFENCE TO BULLET TRAIN: WHERE ARE INDIA-JAPAN TIES HEADING?
    Articles, Blog

    FROM DEFENCE TO BULLET TRAIN: WHERE ARE INDIA-JAPAN TIES HEADING?

    August 21, 2019


    WELCOME TO World action and Reaction News…
    todays News is FROM DEFENCE TO BULLET TRAIN: WHERE ARE INDIA-JAPAN
    TIES HEADING? Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrived
    this week in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s home state of Gujarat for what was the tenth
    meeting between the two leaders since Modi came to power in 2014. The centrepiece of the visit has been the
    Mumbai-Ahmedabad high-speed rail project. Modi and Abe laid the foundation stone for
    the bullet train in Ahmedabad on Thursday, with the former lauding Japan as India’s friend
    for having extended a Rs 88,000 crore loan at just 0.1 per cent interest. Further cementing their bilateral ties, India
    and Japan on Thursday also signed 15 memorandums of understanding (MoUs), which dealt with
    wide-ranging issues such as bilateral relations, defence and security cooperation, and supporting
    each other for a permanent seat on the United Nations� expanded Security Council. It remains to be seen if the bullet train
    will prove to be economically viable and whether India and Japan’s joint front against China
    will yield any dividends for either of the nations going ahead. Japanese firms to invest Rs 5 lakh crore in
    India While no figure was released on how much Japanese
    companies planned to invest in India, some sources said it would be around Rs 5 lakh
    crore, including the flagship bullet train project. One of the more import MoUs was on civil aviation
    cooperation and open skies. (Read all the details here) Apart from fresh investment proposals at the
    summit, Modi claimed Japan�s foreign direct investment (FDI) to India had actually trebled
    in the past few years, a testimony to the growing economic ties. So far, around $25.7 billion has flown in
    as FDI from Japan; the plan now is to double this by 2019. Bullet train project kicks off Modi and Abe on Thursday laid the foundation
    stone for the proposed Ahmedabad-Mumbai High-Speed Rail Network, commonly known as the bullet
    train, in the Gujarat city of Ahmedabad. (Read our full coverage on the viability of
    the bullet train project here) Around Rs 1.10 lakh crore will be spent on
    the project that is being partially funded by Japan. Out of the Rs 1,10,000 crore, Japan is giving
    a loan of Rs 88,000 crore. The interest on this loan is minimal at 0.1
    per cent and it is to be repaid in 50 years, with a grace period of 15 years. The train will stop at each of the 12 railway
    stations on the route, but only for 165 seconds. A 21-km-long tunnel will be dug between Boisar
    and BKC in Mumbai, of which seven km will be under water. Enhancing Defence ties with an Eye on China,
    Countering Terrorism During the visit, Abe and Modi agreed to deepen
    defence ties and push for more cooperation with Australia and the United States, as they
    seek to counter growing Chinese influence across Asia. (Read all the details here) Abe’s visit comes less than three weeks after
    New Delhi and Beijing agreed to end the longest and most serious military confrontation along
    their shared and contested border in decades. In fact, Japan had come out in full support
    for India in its protracted military standoff with China at Doklam, near the Sikkim-Tibet-Bhutan
    tri-junction, saying no country should use unilateral forces to change the status quo
    on the ground. In a lengthy joint statement, India and Japan
    said deepening security links was paramount. This included collaboration on research into
    unmanned ground vehicles and robotics and the possibility of joint field exercises between
    their armies. There was also “renewed momentum” for cooperation
    with the United States and Australia. Both nations addressed the other’s security
    concerns beyond China too. Modi and Abe used the summit to jointly condemn
    North Korea�s latest nuclear test and uranium enrichment activities, urging the hermit nation
    to comply with UNSC resolutions. Further, one of the most significant joint
    announcements was when the two called upon all countries to work towards rooting out
    terrorist safe havens. India and Japan vowed to cooperate to tackle
    terrorist groups and the joint statement by the two countries mentioned names such as
    Al-Qaeda, Lashkar-e-Taiba, and Jaish-e-Mohammed. The two leaders also demanded Pakistan to
    initiate action against terrorist outfits responsible for attacks in Mumbai (2008) and
    Pathankot (2016). Progress On India-Japan Trade Will Take Time
    to Fructify Though the India-Japan joint statement mentioned
    �enhancing free, fair and open trade�, the industry specific trade developments will
    take time to fructify. India�s trade with Japan fell 16 per cent
    in four years from 2013-14 to 2016-17, mostly on account of falling petroleum demand and
    prices. (Take a look at India’s major imports and
    exports with Japan here) Petroleum products like liquid paraffin, mineral
    oils and transformer oils form the highest exported component (at the 8-digit HS code
    level), but their exports to Japan have bottomed over the years, from more than a third of
    total exports at $2.4 billion to $70 million. By and large, this can be attributed to fallen
    oil prices and reduced demand from advanced economies, including Japan. On the other hand, petrochemical exports � especially
    those of naphtha and some oils � to Japan have improved, but there is a caveat. �Naphtha is getting exported without adding
    value domestically as a raw material,� Mahendra Singh, general secretary of the Chemicals
    and Petrochemicals Manufacturer�s Association (CPMA) of India told Business Standard. Throwing the Doors Open for Japanese Industrial
    Townships and Expats With India and Japan declaring that the key
    to global economic progress lies in the development of both the Indian and Pacific Ocean regions,
    PM Modi on Thursday invited more Japanese investments in India even as agreements were
    announced for setting up four Japanese industrial townships in India. “Today, four locations have been announced… Gujarat, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil
    Nadu… for setting up Japanese industrial townships,” Modi said on Thursday in his address
    at the India-Japan Business Plenary, which was held
    in Gandhinagar.

    Is CHINA the new tiger of BANGLADESH? – KJ VIDS
    Articles, Blog

    Is CHINA the new tiger of BANGLADESH? – KJ VIDS

    August 21, 2019


    (curious music) – [Narrator] Bangladesh
    and China have maintained good relations for much of history. Today the two countries share a strong strategic relationship, with China playing a vital role
    mainly in terms of economic and infrastructure
    development of Bangladesh. However, things weren’t so
    good especially during the time when Bangladesh gained
    independence from Pakistan and the subsequent years
    until around the mid 1970s. I’m your host, Kasim. Welcome to another KJ Vid. In this video we will
    look at the relationship between China and Bangladesh. During Bangladesh’s War
    of Liberation in 1971, there was a outbreak of
    complex geopolitical rivalries. India had allied with Bangladesh
    due to their long-term conflicts with Pakistan, and
    more so because Bangladesh was actually a part of Pakistan after the end of the
    British empire since 1947. China had been allied with
    Pakistan for most of history, and the ties strengthened
    especially around the time of the Sino-Indian war in 1962. As a result China opposed
    Bangladesh’s independence and vetoed their UN membership until 1974. It was only after the military
    coup in Bangladesh in 1975 that relations between
    Bangladesh and China started to improve. Prime Minister of Bangladesh
    since their independence, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman had
    close ties with India, and only months after
    the military takeover, China eventually recognised
    Bangladesh as an independent state as diplomatic
    relations were secured. This dramatic transformation
    was fascinating, but it did not come as a
    surprise as the military rule led by President Ziaur
    Rahman distanced Bangladesh from India and the Soviets, which can possibly be
    regarded as one of the most significant reasons for
    their improved relationships. Ziaur Rahman helped
    restore free market economy in Bangladesh and made
    a visit to China in 1977 which is regarded as a crucial
    step in laying groundwork for bilateral cooperation, which was followed by
    Chinese visits to Bangladesh in the late 1970s. Since then, state visits
    between the two countries have been regular most of
    which have resulted in positive discussions and signings
    of agreements on political, economic, and security issues. Bangladesh and China have
    a very strong relationship that ranges from the
    spheres of the economy, politics, development,
    to defence and security. Today, Bangladesh considers China an “all-weather friend
    and a trusted ally”. In the 2010 visit to Bangladesh by then Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, he stated that Sino-Bangladesh
    relations would remain strong regardless of any change in the domestic or international situation. Bangladesh Prime Minister
    Sheikh Hasina on the other hand reiterated the importance
    of the country’s bilateral relations with China
    considering them a major ally of the highest significance. One of the most important
    aspects of the Sino-Bangla bilateral relations is
    the economic cooperation. China are by far the largest
    trading partner of Bangladesh with the latest World Bank
    figures revealing that Chinese exports to Bangladesh to be worth over 10 billion dollars in 2015. On the other hand Bangladesh is China’s third
    largest trade partner. Majority of Bangladesh’s
    imports from China consist of raw materials
    for clothing and textile. However, the balance of
    trade between the countries is significant with
    Bangladesh having a deficit of approximately nine billion dollars. Reduction in trade deficit
    has been a primary concern for Bangladesh over the years, and following negotiations China
    agreed to provide duty-free access to around 5,000
    Bangladeshi products to the Chinese market under the
    Asia Pacific Trade Agreement which has so far resulted
    in a slight decline in the ratio of trade deficit. Talks have been in
    progress for several years about Bangladesh seeking a
    zero-tariff access of 99 percent items including Ready-made
    garments products in order to improve balance of trade. China’s meteoric rise in becoming
    the second largest economy in the world only behind the United States by toppling Japan was possible largely due to its diversified economy, while having 14 FTA’s with developed as well as developing
    countries around the globe. However there are some
    challenges of the FTA, mainly with regard to
    China’s ‘Made in China 2015’ industrial policy plan. There are significant restrictions
    on investing in China, and also preference is given
    to state-owned enterprises that control 38 percent of
    industrial assets in China, skewing competition in the
    market in favour of those. Also another concern for foreign investors is the ‘Chinese ways’ of
    implementation and enforcement of laws and regulations which
    tend to be ambiguous and lax. A major geopolitical
    challenge concerning the FTA would come from the
    United States and India, especially with India also having a strong
    alliance with Bangladesh. Chances are that India may
    take the Chinese assertion in its backyard as a means
    of increasing influence in India’s sphere, while the
    United States may consider an FTA as a geo strategic
    obstacle in containing China at the Bay of Bengal and
    the Indian Ocean region. However, if Bangladesh
    wants to achieve a fairly unrestricted access to Chinese markets it needs to keep pushing further
    on the negotiation table, while asserting to their
    other major allies, India and the United
    States that the actions are for their own best interests mainly in terms of economic development. The recent trade war
    instigated by Donald Trump with his protectionist approach, with Chinese retaliations following by, has had impacts in the
    Bangladeshi economy. There has been a rise in
    steel prices, mainly rods, in the domestic market
    threatening both the major public infrastructure projects
    and the real estate market due to the US imposing
    tariff on 34 billion dollars worth of exports from China. While the latter imposed
    tariffs on American cotton, and while China plan on
    importing cotton from India, the prices had already
    increased by 10 to 12 percent. It must be noted that more
    than half of Bangladesh’s cotton imports are from India. Soaring cotton prices would
    significantly hurt Bangladesh’s economy as they would affect
    the ready made garment sector. Despite having strong economic ties there have been disagreements; a significant one is
    Bangladesh’s refusal of agreeing to China’s terms and
    conditions for the construction of the Sonadia deep-sea port in 2014. But generally, defence cooperation
    has been one of the major strengths in the bilateral relations between the two countries. China happens to be the
    only country that Bangladesh has signed a defence agreement
    with, which was done in 2002. Since then China had been the
    largest supplier of weapons and military equipment to Bangladesh, with latter being the
    second largest recipient of Chinese arms in the
    world between 2011 and 2015. Between 2013 and 2017, China
    has provided Bangladesh with 71 percent of all
    their arms purchases. Bangladesh also recently
    purchased their first submarine to add to their naval fleet
    causing concerns in India. The Bangladeshi armed forces
    have acquired large numbers of tanks, large-caliber artillery, armoured personnel carriers, small arms and light weapons, as Chinese arms are the
    Bangladeshi Army’s weapon of choice while the Navy use Chinese
    frigates with missiles, missile boats, torpedo boats among others. China has also been supplying fighter jets and training aircraft to the Bangladeshi Air Force since 1977. Very recently, China and Bangladesh made crucial developments
    in security cooperation. The bilateral relations
    between the two countries have been elevated to “Strategic Partnership of Cooperation”. The deal is aimed at intelligence sharing and counter-terrorism activities, although other important
    matters such as cyber crime, militancy, transnational
    crimes, narcotics, fire service, and visa issues were also discussed during the signing of
    this major agreement. Development cooperation
    is an integral part of the bilateral relations
    between China and Bangladesh. China has played a crucial role in the infrastructure
    development of Bangladesh over the years. It has assisted Bangladesh
    in building bridges, roads and railway tracks and power plants. The development assistance
    from China to Bangladesh and other developing countries
    mostly come as LOC’s. During a recent Bangladesh visit in 2016, President Xi Jingping
    promised 24 billion dollars in economic assistance to Bangladesh mainly as LOCs related to 24 projects. China assisted Bangladesh
    in the construction of six bridges commonly known as the “”China- Bangladesh
    Friendship” bridges. China also helped
    Bangladesh in constructing the Barapukuria coal-fired
    power plant located in Dinajpur in the
    North West of Bangladesh and was commissioned in 2006. During Jingpin’s visit
    to Bangladesh in 2016, the two countries signed
    agreements for two 1320 Megawatt coal-fired power plants. One in Payra, Patuakhali and the other in Banshkhali, Chittagong. Making China the largest energy partner to Bangladesh overtaking India. China has also provided economic
    assistance to Bangladesh in terms of free aid and token gifts. Two major agreements were signed in 2010 for establishing a fertiliser factory, and telecommunications
    network systems in Bangladesh that were to be set up with
    a 770 million dollar LOC from China with a two
    percent interest rate payable within 20 years. There had been discussions
    for several years on potential road and railway connections
    linking Chittagong with Kunming that would boost the economies
    of both the countries. However, that has not
    materialised as of yet. Currently China is developing
    a 750 acre industrial park in Chittagong which will take five years to become fully operational
    and it will largely be used by Chinese manufacturing firms. The good relations shared
    between China and Bangladesh have always been of mutual interests and both countries benefit from that. Although the growing relations
    between China and Bangladesh raise geopolitical tensions
    in the South Asia region and the Bay of Bengal, there
    should not be much doubt about China’s primary interest lies in the booming economy of Bangladesh, which has been ever so dependent on their bilateral trade relations. Bangladesh’s Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has recently said that there
    is nothing to be concerned about for India while not
    explicitly mentioning China or any other country, and
    that Bangladesh need funds for the sole purpose of development and that she would welcome any country that is willing to invest in the country. She also urged India to
    maintain cordial relationship with all its neighbours. Keeping close ties with
    Bangladesh will no doubt be hugely beneficial for China as
    the demand for oil and gas have risen largely owing
    to its growing industries, and having a strong geopolitical presence in the Bay of Bengal and
    the littoral countries could give them an advantage
    in terms of accessibility to various ports. On the other hand, as it stands, Bangladesh can only benefit
    from the cooperation with a major economic power
    as it has done so in terms of their diplomatic, economic,
    and security affairs. And would be keenly anticipating
    further developments in their bilateral cooperation. (curious music)

    Local animal rescue group asking for public’s help after dog found tied to post, shot to death
    Articles, Blog

    Local animal rescue group asking for public’s help after dog found tied to post, shot to death

    August 21, 2019


    TAKEN TO TO THE HOSPITAL AND IS EXPECTED TO BE OKAY. WE ARE ASKING POLICE IF ANYONE IS ARRESTED AND OF CHARGES WILL BE FILED. KNEW, THE SEARCH IS ON FOR THE PERSON WHO KILLED A DOG IN WESTMORELAND COUNTY, CHANNEL 11, AMY, IS LIVE AFTER TALKING WITH THE HUMANE AGENT WHO IS NOW INVESTIGATING ALL OF THIS. AMY. Reporter: MELANIE, THIS CRIME IS JUST BEYOND SHOCKING. AND SO HORRIFIC, THAT ANIMAL RIGHTS GROUP AND ANIMAL RESCUE GROUPS ARE NOW ASKING FOR ANYBODY TO COME FORWARD AND HELP SERVE AS A VOICE FOR THIS DOG. IT IS COMPLETELY EVIL. Reporter: IT IS A HORRIFIC CRIME, A BOXER MIX, NO MORE THAN 40 FOUR YEARS OLD TIED TO A ROPE AND SHOTS JEFF. SOMEONE CALLED ALL BUT FORGOTTEN ANIMAL RESCUE SAYING THEY MADE THE DISTURBING DISCOVERY. THERE WERE SOME ISSUES WITH THE MUZZLE THAT MADE IT LOOK LIKE THAT HE WAS TRYING TO GET FREE. IT LOOKED LIKE HE HAD A STRUGGLE. I DON’T UNDERSTAND WHY YOU WOULD COME TO THIS POINT. Reporter: POLICE WILL BE SCOURING THE EVIDENCE LEFT BEHIND. A MUZZLE, A DISTINCT ROPE AND LEATHER COLLAR AND A LEASH.’S SEARCHING FOR FINGERPRINTS. HOPEFULLY THE PUBLIC WILL RECOGNIZE SOME OF THE PICTURES, A COLLAR, THE LEASH. Reporter: INVESTIGATORS WILL BE LOOKING AT SECURITY CAMERAS IN HOMES AND BUSINESSES OFF OF TURNER VALLEY ROAD. THEY HAVE AGREED TO TURN OVER THEIR CAMERA FOOTAGE FROM CFX, OFFICER PERRY A CERTAIN SOMEONE SAW OR HEARD SOMETHING. ANYTHING WILL HELP US. Reporter: NOW, AND AUTOPSY WILL BE PERFORMED ON THE DOG AS INVESTIGATORS LOOK FOR MORE CLUES. VERY COWARDLY. I WOULD HOPE THIS INDIVIDUAL WOULD STEP UP. Reporter: THE HUMANE OFFICER SAYS THEY WILL BE GOING FOR FELONY CHARGES, THEY ARE AGAIN, PLEADING WITH ANYBODY WHO KNOWS ANYTHING TO COME FORWARD.

    Joe Keery Talks About His Famous Hair
    Articles, Blog

    Joe Keery Talks About His Famous Hair

    August 21, 2019


    -Absolutely. -I´m such a huge fan
    of the show. Steve is one
    of my favorite characters. -Thank you. Thank you.
    -A great — He had a great Season 2,
    I thought. -Yeah, yeah. -Really enjoyed Steve
    in Season 2. -Yes, yes, yes. -A lot of actors prepare
    for roles. I heard you prepared
    for six weeks for an element of Steve that maybe turned out to be
    a waste of time. -At the beg– yes, at the
    beginning of the first season, I got the part and talked
    to the Duffer Brothers, and they´re saying,
    “Yeah, it´s gonna — he´s gonna be kind of, like,
    this jock character. And he´s, like, a swimmer.” They had that incorporated
    in the thing. So for, you know, the first —
    I don´t know — for like six weeks
    prior to shooting, I was training, doing all this,
    like, you know, swimming prep, and then show up, you know — Also, I thought I was gonna be
    in, like, a Speedo. -Yeah.
    -It´s a TV show. Like, the first thing
    I ever did, I was gonna be in a Speedo,
    so… -Yeah, so you don´t want to be,
    like, the chunky swimmer. Yeah. -I was gonna be known
    as “Chunky Steve” for the rest of my life.
    -Yeah, exactly. -No, but then, we showed up
    the first day, and, like — “Oh, yeah, the swim–
    Oh, no, no, we cut that. No, we cut that.”
    [ Laughter ] So that was totally —
    -So you just got like six weeks of working out
    for nothing. -Yeah, it´s, like, the most
    in shape I´ve ever been. -Yeah, although, it is good
    to be in shape because — and I remember this, but watching the show
    really brings it into focus — very tight jeans in the ´80s.
    Are you in — -They´re very tight.
    -Yeah. -They don´t tell you about that
    when they cast you. -Yeah. -About the jeans and how tight
    they will make them. -Yeah.
    -Yeah. -I feel like…
    -Oh, yeah. -…when you watch,
    like, Jane Austen, you realize how painful
    corsets look on women. And then, when you watch
    “Stranger Things,” you´re like, “Jeans were not
    a good time in the ´80s.” -It´s a similar thing.
    -Yeah. -Oh, yeah. Jeans were very tight
    in a lot of ways and places that you might
    not ex– you know. And, also,
    the material that they have… [ Laughter ]
    The material is, like, stretchy that they have for jeans now,
    you know. -Yeah. It has a little give.
    -Jegging? -Yeah.
    -It´s like nothing. It´s like you´re wearing
    a baseball glove. -Yeah.
    -It´s like a — you know. Very tight.
    [ Laughter ] -It´s basically like — like,
    yeah, denim is chain mail. -Yeah.
    -Yeah. -So you´re having to, like,
    duck and run around, but you´re trapped. -One of the other things
    is you — The Demogorgon last year was a man in a Demogorgon suit.
    -Oh! -And these are
    pretty awesome photos of — -That´s Mark. Yeah. -That´s Mark.
    -Yeah. -Who was a Demogorgon.
    -Yeah. -And so when you had to fight
    the Demogorgon in Season 1, you actually had somebody
    who was in the room. -Right, yeah, yeah, yeah.
    That was kind of the big difference between
    the first and second season. -Because now it´s CGI.
    -Yeah, it´s CGI. ´Cause they can´t have,
    you know, like, a person on all fours
    pretending to be a little… – Yeah.
    -…dog guy. -Like, you can´t have
    a person this small in a — I mean, they can´t —
    they won´t let children do it. -Yeah, it´s, you know.
    [ Laughter ] They´re already breaking so many
    laws with what they´re doing. I mean, compared to last year,
    it´s like I just felt terrible having to — you know,
    he´s in this big, hot suit, and he´s sweating. He´s getting, like,
    water through a tube and a fan, and he´s, like…
    between takes. And then, “Action!” and I literally,
    for like eight hours, had to just, you know —
    hit, just — smack him, like… -Just whale on him.
    -Like, in the stunt, he´s, like, sweating and hot
    and tired and… -Was he ever like,
    “I´m not a real Demogorgon”? -Yeah. He´s — I´d be like,
    “Dude, I am so sorry.” I´m trying to sell it.
    So, you know. -Your hair receives
    a lot of ink. -Yes.
    [ Scattered cheers ] -Multiple —
    -Yes. -These are multiple headlines just about your hair
    on the show. -This is so crazy.
    -“How to Get ´Stranger Things´ star
    Joe Keery´s Gravity-Defying Hair.”
    [ Light laughter ] I like this — “We Need
    To Talk About Steve´s Hair From ´Stranger Things´ Again.”
    [ Laughter ] We already needed
    to talk about it. We need to talk about it again. -Yeah, yeah.
    -And this — but this — you just brought this
    with you, right? -This was not —
    -Yes. I mean, yeah. My — I mean, my parents have
    kind of crazy hair. [ Laughter ]
    I guess. I don´t know. Yeah, for a long time,
    my dad was always on me about, you know,
    cutting my hair. And you know, “Go get a haircut.
    You got to, like, gel your — got to do something to get your
    hair to stay down, you know? Like, it´s too big.
    Get it down, you know? It looks crazy.”
    [ Light laughter ] -So when you got the part,
    did you call your dad and give him the news
    that you were right? -Finally, I´m right, you know.
    [ Laughter ] No. No. No. Yeah. -You play a high schooler
    on the show. What were you doing —
    when you were in high school, what were —
    what were your jobs? What were you doing for — -Um, man,
    I worked at a restaurant. I was a —
    Oh, I delivered pizza for — -I was a pizza delivery guy,
    as well. Did you enjoy that?
    -It´s okay. -Yeah.
    -Yeah. I wasn´t so great at it. I didn´t have —
    It was before — I didn´t have the iPhone.
    -Yeah. -So I was just like — as we´re getting the pi–
    I don´t know. -Yeah, no, you would have
    a map in the car. -You would look at the map.
    You would look at the map. And then — And I didn´t
    even have one in the car. I didn´t even — So it was just
    look at the map and then say, “Oh, I guess that´s kind of
    where it is,” and then just go. -Oh, so you´d
    have to memorize the map? -It was terrible, yeah. -Did you ever have any angry
    customers who got late pizza? -Oh, that´s one
    of my dad´s favorite stories. This old guy just —
    I had to, you know — I was calling him, hanging up. Like, calling — Like,
    “I don´t know where you are.” He´s like, “It´s over here.” You know, it´s like this
    really kind of weird building. And I finally pulled up. And I was like, “I´m so –”
    Like, “I´m terribly sorry. Of course,
    you don´t have to pay. I´ll pay for the pizza.
    You know, whatever.” And then he didn´t say anything. It was this old guy with his
    hat, and it was just really low. He was really short, too. I just remember
    how short he was. I pull up in my Volvo,
    and he just takes the thing. Just writes on the thing. Looks at me, like,
    just really dead in the eyes, and then gives me back
    the receipt and walks inside. [ Chuckling ] And on the thing,
    he had just written, “Pizza delivery is not for you.” [ Laughter ]
    It´s like… And then I quit.
    And that´s when I knew. -It´s funny. That´s great.
    -Yeah. -Yeah, he sent — It´s also — I don´t know who reads that and
    is like, “But it´s my dream!” -Yeah, I know, like — Who´s like that´s their main —
    -Yeah. -It´s like,
    “Are you kidding me?” -Yeah.
    -“This is what I was going for.” -I like to think that that guy
    is watching “Stranger Things,” seeing you,
    and a tear runs down his cheek. -Yeah.
    -He´s like, “I told him to go chase” —
    [ Laughter ] -He was the guy. Yeah.
    -Yeah. “I knew. I knew.” -It was you out there.
    Wherever you are, old man. Yeah, yeah.
    -Thanks so much for being here.

    Crossing Gates Almost Hits 2 Cars as CSX Train Approaches
    Articles, Blog

    Crossing Gates Almost Hits 2 Cars as CSX Train Approaches

    August 21, 2019


    There you go, ladies and gentlemen. Rush hour train with some gate runners right there. Sticky situation here. Those cars got stuck. There’s our boy. CSX O721 Train horn. Heading North. He dropped off everything. Aw man! I want you folks to see how busy this intersection gets. So these cars are coming West bound. right, This is 72nd Ave And those cars are coming South. This car here is turning West. And that big line of cars over there is headed East bound.

    In Revitalizing Railroad Club, Student Sparks New Interest in Industry
    Articles, Blog

    In Revitalizing Railroad Club, Student Sparks New Interest in Industry

    August 21, 2019


    The history of the Illinois Tech Railroad
    Club actually dates back to 1948. Over progress of the years they were able to
    build a gigantic model railroad, and so when I came to campus I knew a little bit
    about Illinois Tech’s history with model railroading and so I was really passionate
    about starting the club again. And so the way we founded was I got some of my
    friends together and I took them to a model train show. And so over the course
    of a half a year and over summer, we worked together, we struggled a lot, a lot
    of things had to be redone, but we ended up building the little section and that
    was enough to show that our club could be successful. And so afterward we got
    university funding and space to start building a full-size model railroad. So
    Chicago is actually the railroad capital of North America. This is where the seven
    multibillion-dollar railroads all connect. There’s lots of job
    opportunities and even like infrastructure to go and see, and so I
    worked with my professors to make our club a official student chapter of the
    American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way association. This is the
    engineering organization that all railroad professionals are part of and
    so through this organization we’ve been able to do guest speakers, we’ve gotten
    tours of real railroad infrastructure, and also many of our members actually
    now have internships in the railroad industry. It’s a very cool technological
    aspect because it’s a combination of many different majors, from the software
    to the hardware to construction and real infrastructure, and it’s also a very
    tangible thing. Trains are big, they’re loud, they’re powerful. Our members and I
    really see a future in this industry as we go into our careers.

    Contoocook Covered Railroad Bridge to undergo repairs
    Articles, Blog

    Contoocook Covered Railroad Bridge to undergo repairs

    August 21, 2019


    WEBSITE, WMUR.COM. THERE, YOU’LL FIND A LIST OF
    RECOVERY RESOURCES IN NEW
    HAMPSHIRE. SEAN: NEW THIS MORNING, THE
    WORLD’S OLDEST SURVIVING COVERED
    RAILROAD BRIDGE IS GETTING A
    FACELIFT. STARTING TODAY, THE BRIDGE
    SPANNING THE CONTOOCOOK RIVER
    NEAR ROUTES 103 AND 127 IN
    HOPKINTON WILL BE STAINED AND
    RECEIVE SOME MINOR REPAIRS. THE PROJECT IS EXPECTED TO LAST
    SEVERAL WEEKS BUT WON’T IMPACT
    TRAFFIC. THE BRIDGE WAS BUILT IN 1889 FOR
    THE CONCORD AND CLAREMONT
    RAILROAD AND WAS USED FOR RAIL
    TRAFFIC UNTIL 19